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Full text of "Town of Wilmington Annual Report"

TOWN OF 

WILMINGTON 

1989 ANNUAL REPORT 




Edmund H. Sargent Water Treatment Plant 



IN MEMORIAM 

GERTRUDE E. ALLGROVE 
GEORGE A. CRISPO 
MARY L. DONAHUE 
ROBERT F. DOUCETTE 
MARJORIE S. ETHIER 
RICHARD GIFFORD 
LAURENCE M. JUERGENS 

LENA LEITER 
ELIZABETH N. NEILSON 
PHYLLIS H. O'LEARY 
SYBIL L. UIBERG 



(Front Cover) 

Edmund H. Sargent Water Treatment Plant located 
in North Wilmington was operational on May 2, 
1989 and was dedicated September 16, 1989. 



Title 

Accepted Streets 

Animal Control Officer 

Board of Appeals 

Board of Assessors 

Board of Health 

Board of Registrars 

Board of Selectmen 

Boards, Committees & Commissions 
Carter (Sarah D.J.) Lecture Fund 

Conservation Commission 

Constable 



Council for the Arts 61 

Council on Aging 47 

Department of Public Works 66 

Directory of Officials 6 

Emergency Management 19 

Fire Department 15 

Handicapped Affairs 68 

Historical Commission 38 

Housing Authority 63 

Inspector of Buildings 20 

Library Director 41 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 63 

Mission Statement 1 

Permanent Building Committee 14 

Planning Board 21 

Police Department 16 

Public Buildings Department 39 

Recreation Commission 40 

Recycling Advisory Committee 28 

Redevelopment Authority 28 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 43 

School Department 70 

Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational Technical High School 78 

Strategic Management Committee 29 

Town Accountant 107 

Town Clerk 13 

Town Collector/Treasurer 10 

Town Counsel 33 

Town Manager , 4 

Town Meetings Annual Town Election - April 15, 1989 80 

Annual Town Meeting - April 22, 1989 81 

Special Town Election - June 13, 1989 101 

Special Town Meeting - October 16, 1989 102 

Special Town Election - November 4, 1989 106 

Veterans' Services 41 

Water & Sewer Department 64 



Page 



23 
27 
48 
12 
30 
14 
2 
7 
38 
44 
4'? 



The "Mission Statement for the Town of Wi iMington" is as follows: 



"The Town of Wilmington, as a municipal corporation, exists in order to deliver a 
wide range of municipal services to those who live, work or own property within the 
borders of Wilmington; and in order to make this community a good place to live, to 
work, and to raise and educate a family, those services must be responsive to the 
needs of the people. They must be effective and efficient. Principles of honesty, 
fairness, dependability and compassion must govern the actons of the officials and 
the employees of the Town. Those who work for the Town as employees or as members 
of boards, committees and commissions are recognized as its most important resource 
and the key to its success in serving the people of Wilmington." 

Endorsed by the Board of Selectmen May 22, 1989. 



Town of Wilmington 



Massachusetts 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Perhaps the issue of greatest focus by this Board in 1989 was traffic. A number of traffic related issues 
have been addressed by the Board of Selectmen. 

Traffic signal i zat i on of the Richmond Street and Main Street intersection was completed on June 30, 1989. 
The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Department of Public Works, has taken over control and maintenance of the 
lights. The State Department of Public Works is studying the traffic flow at this intersection to make 
adjustments on the timing of the traffic lights. These adjustments should improve the flow of traffic 
through the intersection. 

Bell Traffic Signal Maintenance Co., Inc. from Hingham, MA has been hired to install traffic signals at the 
intersection of Deming Way, Burlington Avenue and Chestnut Street. This project will be completed in 1990. 

The intersection of Route 125 and Andover Street has been designated a high hazard intersection by the 
state. While this would normally entitle the town to funding eligibility, state funds are not currently 
available. Peter Breen, a local businessman, is working with businesses in that area to fund design and 
installation of traffic signals. 

Once again the future of the Town Center has been a significant point of attention by the Board of 
Selectmen. The major question centered on whether the Selectmen should endorse "Alternative III" a complete 
traffic improvement plan for the Town Center, or replacement of the Burlington Avenue bridge only. A 
majority of the Board favor the Alternative III option. Selectmen Bruce and McCoy support the bridge 
replacement only plan. However, it now appears that due to the condition of the Burlington Avenue bridge, 
significant repairs or total replacement is essential on an accelerated schedule. A recent inspection of 
the bridge by state officials necessitated closing the bridge to one lane of traffic. 

Our board has withdrawn its support for the state's proposed reconstruction of the Interstate 93 and 
Route 129 Interchange. It is our belief that the reconstruction proposed by the State Department of Public 
Works will not resolve traffic congestion and, in fact, may aggravate the problem on West Street and Lowell 
Street. The state has placed the interchange project on hold. 

A partial truck exclusion on Salem Street received approval from the state Department of Public Works. Due 
to the persistence of many residents in the neighborhood and numerous discussions between our board, the 
Tewksbury Board of Selectmen and state officials, the restriction went into effect in February. The truck 
exclusion is limited to heavy commercial vehicles, in excess of ten tons, traveling westbound on Salem 
Street. The exclusion is in effect 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. An exclusion on trucks traveling 
eastbound from Tewksbury was not possible due to lack of agreement with the Town of Tewksbury on an 
alternate route for truck traffic. 

Affordable housing continues to be a priority of the Board. The Board's Affordable Housing Task Force has 
been working with the Wilmington Community Development Corporation to construct a house on Everett Avenue. 
The house is being built by students from Shawsheen Technical High School. Town owned land on Wi Idwood 
Street is a potential site for additional affordable housing. Negotiations are currently ongoing with 
neighbors to obtain access to the property. 

Negotiations with Reading Municipal Light Department are nearing a close. The Board of Selectmen have been 
negotiating with RMLD to obtain in-lieu of tax payments, representation regarding policy matters and equal 
treatment for streetlight assessments. The Board anticipates that such an agreement may be ready for the 
Town Meeting. Such an agreement will ensure that the Town of Wilmington is receiving fair and equitable 
treatment in its dealings with RMLD. 

Thanks to an affirmative vote at a Special Town Election in November, the Town is proceeding with its plans 
to install two new boilers in the Wilmington High School. The work should be substantially complete by the 
end of September, 1990. 

The town has received a $200,000 donation from A. Fiorenza for use by the town in the area of police and 
fire operations. These funds will be available to the town after his definitive site plan is approved for 
residential subdivision. The development is a 57 lot subdivision slated to be constructed on land off 
Andover Street. The Board wishes to extend our thanks to Mr. Fiorenza for his generous gift. 



Uith the increased budget constraints, the Board established a Recycling Advisory Committee to investigate 
opportunities available to the town to save money on our rubbish disposal costs. The Board approved the 
committee's recommendation to establish a drop-off center for recyclables on town property off Old Main 
Street. The drop-off center is open each Saturday from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m and is staffed by volunteers. 
The Board encourages you to use the center. Recycling will reduce the town's solid waste budget while also 
saving the environment. 

In June the Board of Selectmen voted to lease the South Street School to the Marine Corps League. The 
League had requested use of the building as their headquarters for meetings of their membership and various 
special activities which might occur throughout the year. The Marine Corps League has completed significant 
renovations inside of the building. 

As the town's lease on an animal shelter on McDonald Road expired, a search for a new site was started. An 
interim agreement with Central Animal Hospital in Stoneham was executed to address the immediate issue of 
space needs. Several sites were presented to the Selectmen as possible options for location of an animal 
shelter. However, due to concerns raised by residents the proposed sites were rejected. The Board will 
continue to explore alternative sites. 

On a sad note, Lawrence Juergens, one of Wilmington's finest and a patrolman on the Wilmington Police 
Department passed away. The Selectmen authorized the placement of a granite marker, in his honor, on the 
Town Common near the site of the time capsule, which he helped bury during Wilmington's 250th anniversary. 

As always the Board wishes to thank the town employees for their continued commitment to the Town of 
Wilmington. We welcome your comments and suggestions and hope that you will participate in the Annual Town 
Meeting scheduled for April 28, 1990 at the Lawrence H. Cushing Gymnasium. 




Robert J. Cain, Chairman 
James C. Stewart 
Robert L. Doucette 
Michael V. McCoy 
Chester A. Bruce, Jr. 



DIRECTORY OF OFFICIALS - January 1. 1990 



Board of Selectmen 



Robert J. Cain, Chairman 
Chester A. Bruce 
Robert L. Doucette 
Michael V. McCoy 
James C. Stewart 



1991 
1992 
1992 
1990 
1990 



Town Manager 



Reginald S. Stapczynski 



Michael A. Caira 



School Committee 



Robert E. Surran, Chairman 1991 

Shirley F. Callan, Vice Chairman 1991 

Andrea M. Paglia, Secretary 1992 

Aldo A. Caira, Sr. 1992 

John J. DeMarco 1992 

James Demos 1990 

Bradford L. Jackson 1990 



Superintendent of Schools 



William H. Fay, Jr. 



Finance Committee 



Neil E. Waisnor, Chairman 

William J. Hanlon, Secretary 

Paul L. Palizzolo 

Anita H. Backman 

George W. Hooper 

Phi I ip Spelman 

Richard Duggan 

Walter J. Kaminski 

Mark F.Lutz 



1992 
1992 
1992 
1991 
1991 
1991 
1990 
1990 
1990 



-6- 



Boards. Commmi ttees & Commissions 1990 



Term 
Expi res 



Appeals. Board of 

Bruce MacDonald, Chairman 1992 

Neil L. Buckley 1991 

Joseph P. McMenimen 1990 

Louis J. Farkas.Jr. Assoc. 1990 

James A. Hackett, Assoc. 1990 
Cassinello, Richard J. Assoc. 1990 



Assessors. Board of 

Anthony E. Krzeminski, Principal 

Roger J. Lessard 

James J. Russo 



Carter Lecture Fund Committee 

Madelon C. Slater, Chairman 1991 

H. Elizabeth White 1992 

Adele Passmore 1992 

Dorothy V. Lafionatis 1991 

Maybelle Bliss, Secretary 1990 

Cemetery Commission 

William H. Russell, Chairman 1992 

Wi lliam F. Cavanaugh 1991 

Wi I lis C. Lyford 1990 

Conservation Commission 

Donald H. Ugolini, Chairman 1990 

John A. White, Jr., V. Chm. 1992 

Gary Mercer, Treasurer 1992 

Sheila Goldfield 1991 

Margaret Imbimbo 1991 

Dennis P. Poltrino 1992 

Thomas R. Roussell 1990 

Counci I on Aging 

Grace Kirkland, Chairman 1992 

Joseph C. Filipowicz, V. Chm. 1990 

Mae Cannizaro, Secretary 1992 

Lillian N. Brown, Treasurer 1990 

Louise Miceli 1992 

Charles N. Gilbert 1992 

Elaine M. Hachey 1991 

Henry C. Latta 1991 

Marilyn K. McCarthy 1991 

Antoinette M. Knowlton 1990 

Frank J. Ratto 1990 

Board of Health 

James A. Ficociello, Chairman 1992 

Milton E. Calder, Sr. 1991 

Joseph A. Paglia 1990 

Handicapped Commission 

Laurence W. Curtis, Chairman 1991 

Frank A. Botte 1992 

Li llian N. Brown 1992 

Robert L. Doucette 1991 

Phyllis P. Genetti 1990 
Carol L. Beaudoin, Secretary 



Hazardous Waste Committee 
Gregroy Erickson, Coordinator 
Walter J. Sowyrda, Emg. Management 
Mi Iton E. Calder 
Bobby N. Stewart, Police Chief 
Daniel Wandell, Fire Chief 



Term 
Expi res 

Historical Commission 

Carolyn R. Harris, Chairman 1990 

Dorothy V. Lafionatis 1992 

Dorothy McKinnon 1992 

Jean M. Ryle 1991 

Michael L. Bridges 1990 

Jean M. Rowe 1990 

Housing Authority 

Kevin J. McMillan, Chairman 1990 

Elaine M. Hachey*, Treasurer 1993 

A. Daniel Gillis, Ass't Treas. 1993 

Mary E Keough - appointed til 1990 

Joan Sadowski - appointed til 1990 
*Rep. of State Housing Authority 

Library Trustees 

Kenneth J. Miller, Chairman 1991 

Maybelle A. Bliss, V. Chm. /Sec 1992 

Patricia F. Duggan 1991 

James F. Banda 1990 

Anne Buzzell 1990 

Lawrence Flaherty 1992 

Permanent Building Committee 

Diane M. Allan, Chairman 1992 

Bernard J. LaVita 1991 

Joseph J. Castronovo 1991 

Robert C. Anderson, Jr. 1990 

Roger J. Lessard 1990 

Personnel Advisory Board 
John F. Burke 
Richard K. Hayden 

Planning Board 

David J. Clark, Chairman 1991 

John R. Garrett, Clerk 1993 

William G. Hooper, Jr. 1994 

Carole S. Hami Iton 1992 

Nancy A. Stouffer 1990 

Recreation Commission 

George L. Howard, Chairman 1991 

Paul J. Bova, Vice Chairman 1992 

Larry G. Noel 1992 

William Savosik 1991 

Judith A. Spinel I i 1990 

Redevelopment Authority 

Jay J. Donovan, Chairman 1991 

Carl A. Backman, Jr., Treas. 1994 

Vaughn R. Surprenant, V. Chm. 1992 

Sidney R. Kaiser, Asst. Treas. 1993 

Regional Vocational School Committee 

John M. Gillis 1992 

Kevin John Sowyrda 1991 

Registrars. Board of 

Mary G. Condrey, Chairman 1992 

Robert L. Cavanaugh 1991 

Edward L. Sousa 1990 
Priscilla R. Ward, CMC Clerk 



-7- 



Boards. Commmi ttees & Commissions 1990 



Term 
Expi res 

Town Forest Committee 

Paul C. Duggan 1992 

Robert P. Palmer 1991 

Trustees of Trust Funds 

Elizabeth L. Coville 1991 

Michael Morris 1991 

Joseph R. Peters 1991 

Water and Sewer Commissioners 

Arthur R. Smith, Jr., Chairman 1991 

James A. Ring 1992 

Noel D. Barratta Sr. 1990 

Wilmington Arts Council 

H. Elizabeth White, Chairman 1990 

Edith Michelson, V. Chm. 1990 

Evelyn Choate, Record. Sec. 1991 

Frances Keough, Corres.Sec. 1991 

Anne Buzzell, Treasurer 1991 

Daniel H. Ballou, Sr. 1991 

Marguerite Elia 1991 

Bruce E. Jope 1991 

Mary R. Orner 1991 

Tina Prentiss 1991 

Augustine Rice 1991 

Carmelo J. Corsaro 1990 

Mary J. Masse 1990 

Annette Campbell 1990 

Adele Passmore 1990 

Charlotte L. McCain, Advisory 1990 



Wilmington Election Officers 1990 
Precinct 1 

Mary D'Eon, Warden Annually 



Helen F. Sears, Dep. Warden 
Sandra S. Volpe, Clerk 
Phyllis M. Flaherty, Dep. CI 
Clarice J. Ross, Inspector 
Marjorie Metcalfe, Dep. Insp. 
Edith Ann Graham, Inspector 
Jane A. Hill, Dep. Insp. 



Wilmington Election Officers 1990 

Precinct 2 
Andrea Houser, Warden 
Henrietta I. Bonnell, Dep. Warden 
Jean Buck, Clerk 
Helen DelTorto, Dep. Clerk 
Eleanor Doyle, Inspector 
Helen F. Rouche, Dep. Insp. 
Lorita B. Bower, Inspector 
Lillian N. Brown, Dep. Insp. 

Precinct 3 
Mary E. Woods, Warden 
Loretta R. Caira, Dep. Warden 
Florence A. Balkus, Clerk 
Jane Caira, Dep Clerk 
Morinne M. Markey, Inspector 
Alice Marcy, Dep. Insp. 
Ruth J. Bedell, Inspector 
Barbara J. Buck, Dep. Insp. 

Precinct 4 
William H. Russell, Warden 
Sarah H. Cosman, Dep. Warden 
Elizabeth Cavanaugh, Clerk 
Mary O'Rourke, Dep. Clerk 
Joan Searfoss, Inspector 
Louise M. Wallent, Dep. Insp. 
Mary J. Johnson, Inspector 
Leon E. Rouche, Dep. Insp. 

Precinct 5 
Margaret Blonigan, Warden 
Sandra Curtin, Dep. Warden 
Annabell L. Antinarelli, Clerk 
Jeanne LeFavor, Dep. Clerk 
Judith A. Simmons, Inspector 
Charles Ellsworth, Dep. Insp. 
Mary Husen, Insp. 
Marion J. Woller, Dep. Inspector 

Precinct 6 
Margaret Perry, Warden 
Nancy Bodenstein, Dep. Warden 
Sandra Murphy, Clerk 
Helen F. Rouche, Dep. Clerk 
Edna Lowe, Inspector 
Jean M. Draper, Dep. Insp. 
Elizabeth Andrews, Inspector 
Evelyn W. Conlin, Dep. Insp. 



-8- 



OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS - JANUARY 1. 1990 



Accountsnt 


Michael Morris 


658- 


331 1 


Admi ni St rdt i V6 Assistant 


Margaret A. Tarantino 


658- 


331 1 


Animal Inspector 


Ell en G . Dav i s 


658- 


7845 


Assistant Town Manager 


Jeffrey M. Hul I 


658- 


331 1 


Appeals, Board of 


Bruce MacDonald, Ch. 


658 


4531 


Assessor, Principal 


Anthony E. Krzeminski 


658 


3675 


Conservation Administrator 


Ei leen M. Flaherty 


658 


8238 


Constabl e 


David Axel rod 


658 


3920 


Council on Aging 


Edith Cunningham 


657 


7595 


Dog Officer 


E I len G . Davi s 


658 


7845 


Emergency Management Director 


Walter J. Sowyrda 


658 


3346 


Fire Chief 


Daniel C. Wandell 


658 


3346 


Gas Inspector 


William R. Harrison 


658 


3223 


Housing Authority 


Ella M. Bel more 


658 


8531 


Inspector of Buildings 


James J . Russo 


658 


4531 


Ipswich Watershed Commission 


Herbert D. Nickerson 


658 


4207 


L i brar i an 


Ph i I i p W. Mer i am 


658 


2967 


Metropolitan Area Planning Council 


Jay J. Donovan 


658 


3181 


Middlesex County Advisory Board 


Robert J. Cain 


658 


4772 


Planning Director 


Janet R. Stearns 


658 


8238 


Plumbing Inspector 


Wi 1 1 iam R. Harrison 


658 


3223 


Police Chief 


Bobby N. Stewart 


658 


5071 


Public Buildings, Superintendent of 


Roger J. Lessard 


658 


3017 


Director of Health 


Gregory P. Erickson 


658 


4298 


Public Health Nurse 


Ann FitzGerald, R.N. 


658 


4298 


DPU Superintendent 


Robert P. Palmer 


658 


4481 


Recreation Director 


Ronald Swasey 


658 


4270 


Sealer of Weights and Measures 


James J. Babineau 


658 


3734 


Town Clerk 


Prisci I la R. Ward, CMC 


658 


2030 


Town Counsel 


Alan Altman 


658 


3388 


Town Engineer 


Harold R. Gi I lam 


658 


4499 


Town Manager 


Reginald S. Stapczynski 


658 


3311 


Finance Director 


Joseph R. Peters 


658 


3531 


Veterans' Agent 


Paul A. Farrell 


658 


3311 


Veterans' Grave Officer 


Paul A. Farrell 


658 


3311 


Water and Sewer, Superintendent of 


Paul C. Duggan 


658 


■4711 


Wiring Inspector 


James J. Russo 


658 


4531 



-9- 




Town Collector/Treasurer 



COMMITMENTS - 1989 

1990 Real Estate * 9,353,265.89 

1990 Personal Property 129,309.89 

1989 Real Estate 11,700.89 

1989 Excise 1,U3,588.03 

1988 Excise 62,889.75 

1987 Excise 2,397.89 

1986 Excise 617.50 

1985 Excise 32. 



.but 



1984 Excise 

Ambulance 80,183.00 

Apportioned Sewer Betterment 8,448.97 

Interest 400.66 

Deferred Taxes - 1987 233.81 

Deferred Taxes - 1986 847.18 

Unapportioned Sewer Betterments 4,862.83 

Interest 342.19 

Apportioned Street Betterment 5,250.00 

Interest 256.67 

Water Lien 1,235.11 

Sewer Lien 100.35 

TOTAL COMMITMENT $10,805,971.62 



COLLECTIONS 1989 








1989 




Real Estate 






$18 


296,576 


02 


I nterest 








81,580 


69 


Charges 








2,815 


00 


Personal Property 








229,823 


09 


Interest 








507 


21 


Charges 








78 


00 


Apportioned Street 








190 


50 


I nterest 








60 


37 


Water Liens 








13,635 


19 


Sewer Liens 








907 


76 


Apportioned Sewer 








3,256 


85 


I nterest 








2,138 


22 


Exc i se 








955,172 


72 


Interest 








2,174 


84 


Charges 








8,994 


00 


Unapportioned Sewer 








13,235 


43 


I nterest 








396 


85 


Upapportioned Street 








2,053 


00 


Apportioned Sewer Bett. 


Paid in 


Full 




8,068 


86 


Interest 








348 


19 


Apportioned Street Bett. 


- Paid in 


Full 




5,250 


00 


Interest 








256 


67 


Deferred Tax 








909 


54 


Interest 








171 


45 


Ambul ance 








48,507 


01 


Lien Certificates 








22,215 


00 


Betterment Releases 








156 


00 


Other Town Excises 








1,087 


60 


Water Department Collect 


ons 




3 


382.178 


52 


TOTAL COLLECTIONS 






$23 


082,744 


58 



1988 All Other Years Total 



$ 76,319.30 


$ 30,233 


97 


$18,403,129.29 


13,526.68 


10,990 


80 




106,098.17 


787.00 


664 


00 




4,266.00 


4,385.86 


5,678.60 




239,887.55 


654.18 


3,436.26 




4,597.65 


84.00 


126.00 




288.00 










190.50 










60.37 


1 ,030.74 


10,206 


72 




24,872.65 


93.95 


11,233 


14 




12,234.85 


129.77 


162 


73 




3,549.35 


98.54 


84 


20 




2,320.96 


178,947.84 


28,099 


10 


1 


,162,219.66 


4,910.13 


4,325 


94 




11,410.91 


7,280.00 


4,163 


00 




20,437.00 










13,235.43 










396.85 










2,053.00 










8,068.86 










348.19 










5,250.00 










256.67 










909.54 










171 .45 










48,507.01 










22,215.00 










156.00 










1,087.60 








3 


382. 178.52 


$288,247.99 


$109,404 


46 


$23 


480,397.03 



-10- 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



GENERAL FUNDS REVENUE SHARING 

Balance 7/1/88 $ 8,078.621.23 Balance 7/1/88 $36,020.38 

Receipts 39.952.222.16 Receipts 2.368.91 

Totals 48,030,843.39 $38,389.29 

Disbursements - 40.693.288.33 

Balance $ 7,337.555.06 



INTEREST EARNED CALENDAR YEAR 1989 

Revenue Sharing $ 1.637.60 

General Fund Investments 476.229.03 



Total Interest 



$ 477,866.63 



Board of Assessors 



RECAPITULATION - 1989 - FISCAL YEAR 
Total Appropriations (taxation) $<?8, 860, 255 . 00 

Total Appropriations (available) 2.378.098.00 $31,238,353.0 

Total Deficits 342.00 

School Lunch Program (schools & elderly) 49,154.00 

Free Public Libraries 14,072.00 

School Improvement Council 6,726.00 

Horace Mann Teachers 7,368.00 

Special Education 3,310.00 

Energy Conservation Programs Assessment 13,916.00 

County Retirement Assessment 974,017.00 

County Tax 23,042.00 

Mass. Bay Transportation Authority 355,852.00 

Motor Vehicle Tax Bills 3,337.00 

Air Pollution Control Districts 4,205.00 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 3,423.00 

Amount Certified by Collector & Treasurer for Tax 

Under Estimated to be Raised 1,009.00 

For Tax Title 26,000.00 

Overlay of Current Year 614.510.40 $ 2.100.283. 



Total 



$33,338,636. 

Less Estimated Receipts and Available Funds 

1989 Estimated Receipts from Local Aid & Agency Accts. $ 5,355,726.00 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 1,558,971.00 

Penalties & Interest on Taxes and Excises 165,000.00 

Charges for Services - Sewer 1,184,000.00 

Other Charges for Services 99,000.00 

Pees 26^000.00 

Rentals 10,800.00 

Departmental Revenue - Libraries 7,500.00 

Departmental Revenue - Cemeteries 20,000.00 

Licenses & Permits 218^000.00 

Special Assessments 83,000.00 

Fines and Forfeits 325ioOo!oO 

Investment Income 465 069.00 

Tax Liens 125^000.00 

In Lieu of Taxes 100,000.00 

Miscellaneous 210,000.00 

Emergency State Aid 142,000.00 

Federal Revenue Sharing 3000. 00 

Gifts & Donations 16oi685.00 

Overestimates 1 438.00 

Voted from Available Funds 2.378!o98!oO $12.638.287 



$20.700.349. 



Personal Property $ 18,340,619 a 16.54 p/m $ 303 353 8' 

Real Estate: ' 

Residential 982,446,102 a 8.75 p/m 8 596 403 5' 

Commercial 159,750,700 a 16.54 p/m 2'642'276'5{ 

Industrial 553,707,100 a 16.54 p/m 9!l58!315!4: 

$20. 700, 349. 4C 

Items no t entering into the determination of the Tax Rate; 

1. Betterments and Special Assessments added to taxes: 

a. Street Betterments and Interest $ 13,438.54 

b. Water Betterments and Interest 5'283!l2 

c. Sewer Betterments and Interest 45'o48!71 

2. Liens added to Taxes: 

t- W^ter 51,833.19 
b. Sewer 



3.898.55 



$20.819.851 .51 



-12- 



Town Clerk 



vital Statistics - Chapter 46. General Laws as amended: 



Births - Final figure for 1988 239 

Births - Actually recorded for 1989 221 

Marriage Intentions recorded for 1989 134 

Marriage recorded for 1989 130 

Deaths recorded for 1989 104 



Chapter 46. Section 15: 

The Town Clerk will furnish to parents, householders, physicians, and registered hospital medical officers 
applying therefor, blanks for the return of births as required by law. 

Chapter 207. Sections 19.20 & 40: 

Chapter 718, Acts of 1979 made changes to sections 19 & 20 along with section 40 and as stated before in each 
annual report anyone intending to marry should inquire of this office to see if any changes have been made in 
the laws as they are changing constantly 

Chapter 207. Section 45; 

This chapter provides for the avai labl i I i ty of marriage records: 
Chapter 114. Section 45. 46: 

Thirty-six burial permits have been issued by the Town Clerk as Special Agent to the Board of Health for the 
year. Eight out-of state deaths were reported and filed in this office. Eighteen Wilmington Veterans were 
buried in Uildwood Cemetery, 

TOWN RECORDS 

Permits and Certificates of Registration for the Storage of Inflammables: 

Inflammable permits are issued by the Board of Selectmen through the Town Clerk. Notice is sent to owner or 
occupant of the land were the storage is located on or about March 15th for renewal by April 30th of each 
year. If not registered on time or failure to comply with the Boards regulations may result in revocation of 
the permit after a public hearing. 

Ninety-nine Flammable permits were issued during the year. 

Permits & Recordings: 

Uniform Commerical Code recording 502 

Uniform Commerical Code terminations 76 

Federal Lien recordings 32 

Federal Lien releases 21 

Dog licenses issued 1,358 

Duplicate dog tags 16 

Other Services: 

By virtue of her office, the Town Clerk is clerk to the Board of Registrars. 
In this capacity, she has met with the Board of Registrars on a regular monthly meeting 
night, kept the minutes of same up to date, supervised the Annual Town Census by mail, 
kept the voting list up-to-date, and registered voters during the regular office hours 
of the Town Clerk. She also meets with the Board for Special evening sessions to 
register voters and to certify nomination papers for candidates. 

This year was a year of preparation for the 1990 Federal Census, the Town Clerk compared 
the block counts of the Feds with our Assessors map and was able to substantiate 455 
additional dwellings within our town. 



Business Certificates issued 84 

Business withdrawals 1 

Fish and Wildlife licenses 881 

Pole locations 27 

Medical registrations 

Raffle & Bazaar permits 12 



Annual Town Election 
Town Meeting 
Special Town Election 
Special Town Meeting 
Special Town Election 



April 15, 1989 

April 22, 1989 

June 13, 1989 

October 16, 1989 

November 4, 1989 



-13- 



Board of Registrars 



In accordance with Section I, Chapter 3 of the Town By-Laws, meetings of the Board of 
Registrars were held on the second Monday of each month for the registration of voters 
and to conduct business. Under Chapter 616 of the Acts of 1958, these meetings were 
open to the public and press, and it is so posted in the Town Hall 

The Board held registration sessions as mandated in Mass. General Laws, Chapter 54, 
section 64, Chapter 53, sections 43 & 63 and Chapter 51, sections 26, 28, 29 & 30. 
And all in accordance with the Town Charter and Inhabitant By-laws REvised of the Town 
of Wi Imington. 

The Town Clerk attended most of the Conferences in order to keep up with the changing 
election and census laws. 

The 1989 calendar year ended up with 10,266 registered voters, of our listed 18,131 
inhabitants. 

The Board of Registrars wants to thank all citizens of the town who returned their 
CENSUS forms without delay. A true census is an asset to the town. 



During 1989, the Permanent Building Committee held meetings twice a month. The 
following is a list of projects the Board was involved in: 

In February, the Committee received the final report on the Wilmington Town Common Land Use 
Study prepared by Wallace, Floyd Associates, Inc. 

The installation of the new energy efficient windows had to be interrupted until an asbestos 
problem could be corrected. During the summer, asbestos was removed from the classrooms 
slated to receive the new windows. In the early fall the window project was completed. Now 
all the windows in the school are the new energy efficient type. 

The Committee performed an in-depth study of the high school heating system and found that 
extensive repairs were required. At the Special Town Meeting on October 16, 1989, the voters 
approved the $852,705 bond issue to fund the high school heating system repairs. At a 
Special Town Election held on November 4, 1989, the debt for this project was exempted from 
the levy limit. Work began during the Christmas/New Year break. 

o The firm of Putnam and Associates was hired to conduct a feasibility study for the Police 
Station and Fire Station/Substation. This study is on-going and should be completed in the 
late spring of 1990. 

o Renovation plans for the Barrows Auditorium (Barrows Cultural Center) will be worked on in 
more detail in 1990. The $157,000 originally set aside for the auditorium was used to remove 
the asbestos in connection with the window installation project. This caused a one year 
delay in the project. It is now anticipated that the auditorium will be funded by a 
combination of public and private money. The Town Manager and the School Superintendent will 
be working with the Permanent Building Committee on pursuing grants and other private sources 
of funding. 

In November, we accepted the resignation of former Chairman, Dr. Robert Soper, who served on the Board for 
four years. We welcomed back Mr. Bernie LaVita, a former Permanent Building Committee member. 




-14- 




Fire Department 



It is my pleasure to submit the following Annual Report of operations, activities, 
accomplishments of the Wilmington Fire Department during the year 1989. 



and to reflect the 



The manual force consists of the Chief, two Deputy Chiefs, five Lieutenants and twenty-eight Privates. 
There is a call force of seven members. The department responded to a total of 1,929 calls during 1989. 



Residential Buildings 


10 


Out of Town Assistance 


54 


Commercial Buildings 


3 


Dumpster 


24 


Chimney, Fireplaces & Woodburning Stoves 


1 


False Alarms or Needless Calls 


76 


Vehicles 


65 


Rescue and Ambulance 


1,145 


Brush, Grass or Rubbish 


109 


Service Cal Is 


442 


imated value of property endangered was (19,473,850. 


Estimated property loss was $525,250. 




following is a list of permits issued: 








Black Powder 


6 


$ 30 




Blasting 


31 


155 




Class "C" Explosives 


1 


5 




Fire Alarm 


138 


690 




Flammable Liquid 


9 


45 




Oil Burner 


171 


855 




Propane 


42 


210 




Report 


53 


265 




Smoke Detector 


188 


940 




Tank 


26 


130 




Court Fee Returned 


2 


10 




Unaccounted 


_i 


20 




TOTAL 


671 


$3,355 





As required by law, inspections of all schools, public buildings, 
Deputy Fire Chief Daniel R. Stewart. 



and all flammable storage were made by 



The Fire Alarm division inspected and tested all boxes. All circuits were tested and checked for repairs. 
All repairs to circuits were made. Circuits were tested and operated in good order. There were 242 
changeovers and 30 new pole changeovers. The installation of five new master boxes, installed and tested 
for complete operation. We overhauled one complete master box, tested and put it back in operation. 
Notified one company of the need to replace an old box which is beyond future repairs. The completion of 
connecting the new figure eight cables has been completed to the North Wilmington side of Town. This wire 
will give us considerable flexibility for communications (alarm circuits, computer use, direct line use, a 
tie-in to future Fire Station, or surrounding towns tie line). The alarm division has in storage additional 
figure eight cable for future extension to other locations of the town. 



I wish to extend my thanks to the staff and members 
loyalty and dedication to duty during 1989. 



of the Wilmington Fire Department for their support. 



-15- 



Police Department 



In accordance with the By-Laws of the Town of Wilmington, I hereby respectfully submit the Annual Report on 
the activities of the Wilmington Police Department for the year of 1989. 

The enclosed statistical report represents the total for all crimes, complaints and incidents reported 
during the year 1989; and, for the most part the corresponding enforcement efforts of the Wilmington Police 
Department. During 1989 the total number of complaints and incidents reported to the police department 
increased by 12% from 10,787 incidents in 1988 to 12,204 during 1989. For the most part these increases 
were spread throughout the various crime categories and service related incidents. However, a number of 
the serious crime categories increased significantly during 1989. Breaking and Entering into homes and 
buildings increased by 255X from 56 incidents in 1988 to 199 during 1989. Armed robberies increased by 125X 
from 4 incidents during 1988 to 9 during 1989. Totals for Assaults and Batteries increased by 224X from 29 
in 1988 to 94 in 1989. Motor vehicles stolen in Wilmington decreased by 10X from 58 in 1988 to 52 in 1989. 
During the past five years Wilmington had enjoyed significant reduction in the areas of burglaries, 
robberies and stolen motor vehicles. As a result of those decreases, Wilmington was listed in the November 
1989 issue of Boston Magazine , as one of the safer communities in which to live. However, the increases 
during 1989 have set the community back to the 1984 level. 

Motor vehicle accidents and traffic congestion continue to be serious community problems; however, during 
1989 the police department experienced a 14X decrease in the motor vehicle accident rate. During 1989 motor 
vehicle accidents decreased by 135 accidents from 980 accidents in 1988 to 845 during 1989. This is the 
lowest accident rate since 1977 when Wilmington experienced 804 accidents. 

The police department continued to place a high priority on the enforcement of motor vehicle violations 
during 1989. During 1989 the department cited 7,783 motor vehicle violations, this represents a slight 
decrease of 1X from the violations cited during 1988. The following are the totals for some of the major 
areas of concern; speeding violations 4,121; operators license violations 491; unregistered and uninsured 
198; and, miscellaneous Violations 3,106. Arrest for operating a motor vehicle under the influence of 
alcohol were increased by 20 from 88 in 1988 to 106 during 1989. 

Arrest for crimes other than motor vehicle offenses during 1989 totaled 822. During 1989 the police 
department continued to place a high priority on alcohol and drug related offenses. As a result, arrest for 
liquor law violations totaled 364 and there was a total of 49 narcotics arrests during 1989. In addition t 
motor vehicle and other criminal arrests, the department placed a total of 181 persons under Protective 
Custody. A total of 1,319 persons were taken into custody by the police department during 1989. As a 
result of the increased enforcement efforts by the department. The fine monies returned to the Town of 
Wilmington from the Woburn District Court increased from S280,820 in 1988 to $360,830 during 1989. 

The department makes note of personnel changes during 1989. Patrolman Lawrence M. Juergens passed away 
after a tragic battle with cancer. Officer Juergens, although with us for only a brief period, earned the 
respect, and won the hearts of each of us. His passing has left a void in the department and in the 
community which cannot be filled. During 1989, Sgt. Herbert Peterson, Officers Daniel H. Ballou and 
Robert E. Vassallo retired from the police department after many years of service. We all wish Herb, Dan 
and Bob health and happiness in their retirement. Officer David McCue was promoted to the rank of 
sergeant. Officer James McNally returned to the police department after an extended leave of absence. 
During that leave Officer McNally served as an Agent with the U.S. Secret Service. The experience which he 
gained in that service will be an asset to the department. Considering the tremendous turnover in the 
police department's personnel during the past few years, the following Departmental Roster is being provided: 



DEPARTMENTAL ROSTER 



CHIEF OF POLICE 
Bobby N. Stewart 



DEPUTY CHIEF 
Bernard Nal ly 



Administrative Division Commander 
Lt. Robert C. LaRivee 



Operations Division Commander 
Command Sgt. James T. Palmer 



SERGEANTS 



Det. Sgt. George E. Shepard 
Sgt. Donald L. Mercier 
Sgt. James J. Rooney 



Sgt. Joseph Duffy 
Sgt. Wi 1 1 iam E. Gable 
Sgt. David McCue 



-16- 



PATROLMEN 



Pt Im. 


James Cuoco 


Ptlm. 


James White 


Pt Im. 


Robert E. Shelley 


Ptlm. 


Jon Shepard 


Pt Im, 


Arthur V. Lynch, Jr. 


Ptlm. 


Robert Richter 


Pt Im. 


Michael McKenna 


Pt Im. 


Thomas Miller 


Ptlm. 


Robert H. Spencer, Jr. 


Ptlm. 


Charles Fiore 


Ptlm. 


Alfred S. Venuti 


Ptlm. 


Paul Chalifour 


Ptlm. 


Michael A. Celata, Jr. 


Ptlm. 


James Hanlon 


Ptlm. 


Joseph Waterhouse 


Ptlm. 


Paul W. Jepson 


Ptlm. 


Lawrence Redding 


Ptlm. 


David L. Axelrod 


Ptlm. 


J. Christopher Neville 


Ptlm. 


Joseph F. Harris, Jr. 


Ptlm. 


Patrick J. King 


Ptlm. 


Joseph A. Desmond 


Ptlm. 


Urn. Mark Jepson 


Ptlm. 


Gregory Farnkoff 


Ptlm. 


Francis Hancock 


Ptlm. 


Michael R. Begonis 


Ptlm. 


James Peterson 


Ptlm. 


James A. McNally 


Ptlm. 


Stephen LaRivee 


Ptlm. 


Chester A. Bruce, 1 1 1 


Ptlm. 


Stephen Mauriello 







n closing this report, I want to thank the Town Manager, the Board of Selectmen, all other Boards and 
loMiittees; and, all department heads and their workers for their support and cooperation during 1989. 

, special note of thanks to the Staff and Members of the Wilmington Police Department, for without their 
upport and continuing efforts none of our accomplishments could have been realized. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT STATISTICS - 1989 



\RRESTS: 
»rson 

assault & Battery 
ireaking & Entering 
lisorderly 
■ ambl i ng 
arceny 

arceny of Motor Vehicle 
.iquor Laws 
lalicious Damage 
Jarcot ics 
Jon-Support 
(ape 

ieceiving Stolen Property 

iobbery 

Runaway 

lex Offenses 

luveni les 

Dther 

Total Arrests 




12 
12 
7 

33 
9 
364 
4 
49 
2 
2 
2 
4 
2 
2 

119 
199 
822 



PROTECTIVE CUSTODY: 

Ages: 

11/12 

13/14 

15 

16 

17 



Total Under 18 



18 
19 

20 
21 
22 
23 
24 

25/29 
30/34 
35/39 
40/44 
45/49 
50/54 



HOTOR VEHICLE VIOLATIONS: 
Jsing Without Authority 
-icense Violations 
Endangering 

.eave Scene Property Damage 
Dperating Under Influence 
Jnregistered/Uninsured 
Speed 

rruck Violations 
Dther 

Total Violations 





491 
39 
18 
108 
198 
121 
221 
587 
783 



55/59 

60 & Over 

Total over 18 

Total Protective Custody 

CITATIONS ISSUED: 

Warnings 

Complaints 

Non-Criminal 

Arrests 

Total Citations 



1 
1 

162 
181 



2,179 
189 

3,620 
287 

6.275 



-17- 




CRIMES REPORTED: 

Arson & Bombing (Threats) 

Assault & Battery: 

Fi rearm 

Knife 

Other Weapons 

Aggrevated-Hands, Fists, etc. 

Simple Assault 

Total Crimes Reported 

ROBBERY; 
Fi rearm 
Other Weapon 
Strong Arm 

Total Robberies 

INCIDENTS REPORTED: 
Alarms Responded To 
Disturbances 
Domestic Problems 
Emergencies Responded To 
Fires Responded To 
Juveniles Complained About 
Missing Persons - Returned 
Missing Persons - Still Missing 
Prowlers Reported 
Miscellaneous Complaints 
Motor Vehicle Accidents 
Cruisers Dispatched 
Suicides & Attempts 
Sudden Deaths 

OTHER DEPARTMENT FUNCTIONS; 
Restraining Orders Served 
Parking Tickets Issued 
Firearm Ident Cards Issued 
License to Carry Issued 
Dealer Permits Issued 
Reports to Ins. Cos., & 
Attorneys 



1,773 
2,114 
203 
151 
97 
1,744 
23 
1 

34 
4,503 
845 
7,897 
2 
14 



113 
363 
121 
292 
8 



592 



BREAKING & ENTERING; 

By Force 

No Force Used 

Attempted Breaking & Entering 
Total Breaking & Entering 

SEX CRIMES; 
Rape 

Indecent Exposure 
Indecent A & B 
Other 

Total Sex Crimes 

LARCENIES ; 

Pocket Picking 

Purse Snatching 

Shopl i f ting 

From Motor Vehicle 

M/V Parts & Access. 

Bikes 

From Bui Idings 
From Coin Machines 
Other 

LARCENY BY CHECK (FRAUD) 
Total Larcenies 

MOTOR VEHICLES STOLEN; 
Autos 

Trucks & Buses 
Other Vehicles 

Total Motor Vehicle Theft 

Recovered Motor Vehicles; 
Stolen Wi Imington 
Recovered Wilmington 
Stolen Wi Imington 
Recovered Out of Town 
Stolen Out of Town 
Recovered Wilmington 

Recovered Motor Vehicles 



U3 

32 
199 



1 
3 

20 
63 
29 
25 
52 


_6i 
257 
31 
288 



YEAR 


COMPARISON OF 
UCR 
CRIME RATE 


UCR AND DEPARTMENT 
ACCIDENTS 


STATISTICS WITH 
MOTOR VEHICLE 
VIOLATIONS 


ENFORCEMENT EFFORTS 
SPEEDING 
VIOLATIONS 


FINES RET. 
TO TOWN 


1979 


56.1 


992 


579 


125 


$ 39,917 


1980 


61.5 


969 


2,417 


1,280 




1981 




1,067 


1,662 


651 




1982 




1,156 


1.045 


328 




1983 




1,176 


2,065 


1,056 


$ 81,541 


1984 


39.4 


1,330 


2,788 


1,408 


t 92,595 


1985 


30.2 


1,396 


4,197 


2.133 


$146,605 


1986 


20.1 


1,039 


5,190 


2,908 


$171,706 


1987 


17.3 


1,082 


4,239 


2.022 


$211,758 


1988 


16.6 


980 


7,931 


3.945 


$280,820 


1989 




845 


7,783 


4.121 


$360,830 



-18- 



ote: The Uniform Crime Report for 1989 should be released by May, 1990. The crime rate reflects the total 
umber of uniform crimes per 1,000 residents. The uniform crimes upon which this rate is based are: 
urder. Rape, Robberies, Aggrevated Assaults, Burglaries, Larcenies and Stolen Motor Vehicles. Based upon 
he considerable increases during 1989 in Robberies, Aggrevated Assaults and Breaks into Residence and 
uilding, the Police Department is projecting a drastic increase in the 1989 crime rate for Wilmington. 



he Wilmington Emergency Management Agency (WEMA) is located in the basement of the old town hall located at 
^19 Middlesex Avenue (Route 62 across from the Congregational Church). The goals of WEMA are to supply 
heeded services to the citizens of Wilmington. We continue to furnish personnel and radio communications to 
kssist at check points for the walk-a-thon. It was our privilege to again provide mobile units equipped with 
radio, telephone, and packet capabilities to assist the Wilmington Police Department this last Halloween, 
bur dive team stands ready for recovery operations and we have shelter capabilities with limited supplies. 

Our radio communications group under the supervision of Doug Chisholm and Herb Nickerson continues to be very 
active. WEMA is fortunate and grateful in having its base station located in the N.Y.N.E.X. tower complex 
located at the junction of Route 129 and Route 38. We are in the process of developing a second radio 
repeater under the direction of Ed Thompson. This second repeaters only function will be that of emergency 
back up to our primary repeater. WEMA continues in the distinct role of being the designated backup 
communications for Massachusetts Civil Defense Area - 1, which is comprised of 85 communities. 

The dive team under the direction of William Gable and Robert Larivee, continues to be an active element of 
WEMA. After two years of waiting, I am happy to announce that the dive team was increased and now has four 
fully equipped certified divers. 

The success of any organization is always attributable to the dedication of its members. As of the date of 
this writing our agency faces close to a 60% cut in funds. I would like to take this opportunity to thank 
all the members of the Wilmington Emergency Management Agency for their steadfast support and loyalty. 

It is with deep regret and a heavy heart that I announce that three members of our radio communications 
group: Thomas Berren, John Orner and Carl Noelcke have become silent keys. They are missed by never 
forgotten. 

The Wilmington Emergency Management Agency again extends it thanks and appreciation to all of you for your 
support . 




19- 





Industrial Buildings 
Commercial Buildings 
Additions & Alterations (non-res.) 
Swimming Pools 
Signs 

Public Buildings 
Multi -Fami ly Dwel I ing 
Sheds & Barns 
Wood Burning Stoves 



$19 


235 


090 


20 


913 


584 


199 


$12,240,80' 


$41 


398 


4A0 


$43 


540 


268 




$38.640.04( 



Renewals 
Demo I it ions 
Fire Damage 
Foundations 
Temporary Trailers 



TOTAL PERMITS 



REPORT OF FEES RECEIVED AND TURNED OVER TO TREASURER; 

Building Permits 
Wiring Permits 
Gas Permits 
Plumbing Permits 
Certificates of Inspection 
Ind. Elect. Permits (annual charge) 
Elevator Certification (insp. fees) 















1 


( 


28 


165,800 


23 


640,127 


14 


103,50( 


1 


25,000 


1 


85,000 





( 


12 


1,425,700 


3 


1,150,000 


4 


128,00( 


4 


10.500 


2 


1 ,300 


1 


( 


45 


$43,025,440 


29 


$45,416,695 


20 


$ 231. 50( 


672 




660 




639 




TREASURER: 










672 


$103,134.00 


660 


$111,149.62 


639 


$115,613.70 


587 


20,569.50 


552 


22,954.00 


567 


26,084.00 


159 


4,018.50 


160 


4,488.50 


177 


5.085.50 


266 


7,254.00 


253 


7,481.00 


270 


7,705.75 


29 


935.00 


23 


1,195.00 


26 


1,319.00 


21 


3,900.00 


25 


3,750.00 


27 


4,050.00 

















.734 


$139,609.50 


1.673 


$151,018.12 


1.706 


$159,857.95 



-20- 



Planning Board 



)uring 1989, the Planning Board welcomed two new staff members. Alma L. D'Antonio was hired in April as the 
Uanning Board's Senior Clerk. Janet R. Stearns was hired in August as the Town's first Planning Director, 
-ol lowing completion of the Town-Owned Land Study, Planning Intern Donald Nadeau departed from the Town 
after working under the direction of the Planning Board for the past two years. Throughout this year the 
Manning Board has also received technical assistance from Town Engineer, Harold Gillam. 

SUBDIVISION CONTROL: 

Jnder the authority vested in the Planning Board of the Town of Uilmington by Section 81-Q of Chapter 41 of 
Che General Laws, the Board reviewed the following subdivision plans: 

o Ainsuorth Road Extension Preliminary Plan #1 - application for submission of proposed 14 lot 
industrial subdivision was disapproved. 

o Larry Cushing Drive Preliminary Plan - application for submission of proposed 6 lot residential 
subdivision approved with conditions. 

o Burtt Road Extension, Corporate Place 93 Definitive Plan - application for submission of proposed 
industrial subdivision, land area primarily in Andover, approved. 

Marion Street II Definitive Plan - application for submission of proposed 8 lot residential 
subdivision, approved with conditions. 

o Ainsworth Road Extension Preliminary Plan #2 - application for submission of proposed 9 lot 
industrial subdivision, approved with conditions. 

o Oakridge Circle Extension Definitive Plan - application for submission of proposed 2 lot residential 
subdivision approved with conditions. 

o Wedgewood Avenue Extension Definitive - application for submission of proposed 4 lot residential 
subdivision approved with conditions. 

Andover Heights Definitive Plan - application for submission of proposed 59 lot residential 
subdivision approved with conditions. 

o Cushing Estates Definitive Plan - application for submission of proposed 11 lot residential 
subdivision - decision pending. 

The Planning Board collected a total of $6,173.57 in filing fees in the 1989 calendar year, with these being 
turned over to the General Fund Account. In December 1989, the Planning Board revised the Subdivision Rules 
and Regulations and its accompanying fee schedule governing filing fees for subdivision and Approval Not 
Required Plans. 

Of the forty-three (43) plans believed not to require approval that were submitted in 1989: The Planning 
Board found that 36 plans did not require approval under the Subdivision Control Law and therefore were 
endorsed; 5 plans were found to require approval and therefore were denied for cause; 2 plans were endorsed 
by the Town Clerk. 



In accordance with M.G.L. ch. 40A, the Planning Board held required statutory public hearings on proposed 
amendments to the Zoning By-Law and Map and submitted formal reports and recommendations to Town Meeting 
voters as follows: 



ZONING: 



TOWN MEETING 
ACTION 



ARTICLE 



PROPOSED ZONING AMENDMENT 



PLANNING BOARD TOWN MEETING 
RECOMMENDATIONS ACTION 



4-22-89 
Spec i a I 



2 



Rezone from R60 to R20, parcel on Hopkins 
Street 



Disapproval 



Approved 



4-22-89 
Annual 



13 



Accept Ch. 245, Acts of 1988 re: Completion 
of Subdivisions 



Approva I 



Approved 



4-22-89 
Annual 



15 



Street Acceptances 



Approval 



Approved 



-21- 



TOWN MEETING 
ACTION 



4-22-89 
Annual 



4-22-89 
Annual 



4-22-89 
Annual 



4-22-89 
Annual 



4-22-89 
Annual 



4-22-89 
Annual 



4-22-89 
Annual 



4-22-89 
Annua I 



4-22-89 
Annual 



4-22-89 
Annual 



4-22-89 
Annual 



10-16-89 
Special 



36 



38 



PROPOSED ZONING AMENDMENT 

Transfer of Town land to non-profit affordable 
housing corporation (Everett Avenue) 

Create a non-profit affordable housing 
corporat ion 

Drainage easement. Walnut Street 

Aquifer Protection Recharge Districts 

Rezone from GI to R60 areas in vicinity of 
Brown's Crossing and Salem Street well sites 

Amend Zoning By-Law, re: Special Permits 

Amend Zoning By-Law re: Restaurants 

Rezone from R60 to R20, Andover Street 

Rezone from R20 to RIO Shawsheen Avenue and 
Carter Lane 

Rezone from R20 to NB, Main and Clark Streets 
Amend Zoning By-Law, re: Hammerhead lots 
Rezone from R60 to R20, Hopkins Street 



PLANNING BOARD TOWN MEETING 
RECOMMENDATIONS ACTION 



Approva I 



PARKING SITE PLAN REVIEW 



Approved 



Approval Disapproved 

Disapproval Approved 

Disapproval Disapproved 

Disapproval Disapproved 

Approval Approved 

Disapproval Withdrew 

Disapproval Approved 

Disapproval Approved 

Disapproval Withdrew 

Disapproval Disapproved 

Approval Approved 



I 



ions for Site Plan Review, referred to the Board by the Town Engineer and 
PLANNING BOARD PARTICIPATION IN OTHER STATE AND LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS 



The Board reviewed 8 applicati 
recommended accordingly. 



The Board wishes to thank William G. Hooper, Jr., its senior member, who acts as its representative at the 
Board of Appeals hearings by expressing the Board's recommendations on zoning variances and special permits 
requested along with offering conditions to be included in Official Map and Board of Appeals decisions. 
Carole Hamilton and David Clark continue to represent the Board on the Affordable Housing Task Force. 
Carole Hamilton has also participated over the year on the Strategic Management Committee. All members of 
the Board attended the Northeast Regional meeting of the Massachusetts Federation of Planning Boards and 
Boards of Appeals with Carole Hamilton and Bill Hooper attending the annual meeting in September. 



Accepted Streets 



STREET 




LOCATION 


LENGTH 


DATE 


(s) ACCEPTED 


Adams Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Parker Street 


2,915 


1908 




Adelaide Street 


from 


Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 


666 


1976 




Agostino Drive 


from 


Gandalf Way 


999 


1979 




Aldrich Road 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


6,740 


1894 




Allen Park Drive 


from 


Fairmont Avenue to Fairmont Avenue 


2,319 


1971 


1984 


Andover Street 


from 


Salem Street 


180 


1894 




Andover Street 


from 


Andover Line to beyond Woburn Street 


11,300 


1894 


1970 


Andrew Street 


from 


Aldrich Road to beyond Houghton Road 


435 


1985 




Anthony Avenue 


from 


Salem Street to Catherine Avenue 


300 


1966 




Apol lo Drive 


from 


Charlotte Road to Draper Drive 


300 


1971 




Arlene Avenue 


from 


Salem Street to Ella Avenue 


3,754 


1966 


1978 


Auburn Avenue 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


755 


1945 




Ayotte Street 


from 


Westdale Avenue to Crest Avenue 


240 


1947 




Baker Street 


from 


Brand Avenue to beyond Phillips Avenue 


684 


1945 




Baland Road 


from 


Ballardvale Street 


540 


1972 




Ballardvale Street 


from 


Salem Street to Route 125 


965 


1894 




Ballardvale Street 


from 


Route 125 to Andover Line 


12,000 


1894 


1985 


Bancroft Street 


from 


Liberty Street 


400 


1952 




Barbara Avenue 


from 


Anthony Avenue to Dorothy Avenue 


850 


1966 




Beacon Street 


from 


Church Street to Belmont Avenue 


970 


1915 




Beech Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Byron Street 


1,005 


1947 




Beech ing Avenue 


from 


Cunningham Street to Faulkner Avenue 


440 


1959 




Belmont Avenue 


from 


Columbia Street to State Street 


980 


1933 




Benson Road 


from 


Radcliff Road to Tewksbury Line 


616 


1971 




Biggar Avenue 


from 


Salem Street to Ring Avenue 


1,282 


1975 




Birchwood Road 


from 


Shady Lane Drive 


1,197 


1952 




Birchwood Road 


from 


Judith Road 


400 


1953 




Blanchard Road 


from 


Kendall Road 


625 


1989 




Boutwell Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Aldrich Road 


4,144 


1894 


1960 1971 


Brand Avenue 




B r i dge L ane 


510 


1 933 


1 943 


Brand Avenue 


from 


Baker Street to beyond Wisser Street 


950 


1933 


1943 


Brattle Street 


f rom 


Massachusetts Avenue to Garden Avenue 


1,066 


1945 




Brentwood Avenue 


from 


Woburn Street to Woodside Avenue 


1,017 


1938 




Bridge Lane 


f rom 


Shawsheen Avenue 


455 


1894 




Bridge Lane 


from 


Main Street to beyond Brand Avenue 


754 


1894 




Broad Street 


from 


King Street 


1,377 


1954 




Burl ington Avenue 


from 


Main Street to Burlington Line 


8,588 


1894 




Burnap Street 


from 


Grove Avenue 


1,145 


1953 




Burnap Street 


from 


Winchell Road 


484 


1945 




Burt Road 


from 


Cedar Street to beyond Water Street 


1,653 


1945 


1946 


Butters Row 


from 


Main Street to Chestnut Street 


3,577 


1894 




Buzzell Drive 


from 


Draper Drive to Evans Drive 


600 


1971 




Canal Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Burt Road 


1,505 


1939 


1955 


Carolyn Road 


from 


North Street to Marcia Road 


1,268 


1960 


1971 


Carson Avenue 


from 


Marie Drive to beyond Hathaway Road 


1,017 


1961 




Carter Lane 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to beyond Norfolk Ave. 


1,411 


1957 




Catherine Avenue 


from 


Anthony Avenue to Arlene Avenue 


1,000 


1966 




Cedar Street 


from 


Burt Road to Harris Street 


687 


1945 




Cedar Crest Road 


from 


Pinewood Road to Judith Road 


1,100 


1963 




Central Street 


from 


Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 


552 


1950 




Chandler Road 


from 


Adams Street to Kelley Road 


400 


1957 




Chapman Avenue 


from 


Hathaway Road to Sheridan Road 


1,575 


1951 


1971 


Charlotte Road 


from 


Gunderson Road to beyond Apollo Drive 


859 


1971 




Chase Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


297 


1953 




Chestnut Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Woburn Line 


11,480 


1894 




Church Street 


from 


Main Street to Middlesex Avenue 


4,285 


1894 




Clark Street 


from 


Main Street to Church Street 


2,470 


1894 


1969 


Clorinda Road 


from 


Agostino Drive 


887 


1979 




Cochrane Road 


from 


Forest Street to Wabash Road 


800 


1947 




Columbia Street 


from 


Church Street to beyond Belmont Avenue 


1,150 


1908 


1933 


Concord Street 


from 


Federal Street to North Reading Line 


5,803 


1894 





-23- 




STREET 

Congress Street 
Cook Avenue 
Coolidge Road 
Corey Avenue 
Cornell Place 
Cottage Street 
Crest Avenue 
Cross Street 
Cunningham Street 
Cypress Street 

Dadant Drive 
Davis Road 
Dayton Road 
Dell Drive 
Dexter Street 
Dobson Street 
Dorchester Street 
Dorothy Avenue 
Douglas Avenue 
Draper Drive 
Drury Lane 
Dubl in Avenue 
Dunton Road 



LOCATIOM 

from Forest Street to Burlington Line 

from Main Street 

from Hathaway Road 

from Canal Street to Grand street 

from Fordham Road 

from Main Street 

from Ayotte Street 

from Main Street to Lowell Street 

from Salem Street to Beeching Avenue 

from Glen Road 

from North Street to North Street 
from Main Street 
from Hathaway Road 
from Burlington Avenue 
from Main Street 

from Glen Road to beyond Garden Avenue 
from Bi I lerica Line 
from Arlene Avenue to Barbara Avenue 
from Palmer Way 

from Gunderson Road to Evans Drive 
from Glen Road to School Street 
from Main Street 
from Nassau Avenue 



LENGTH 

977 
813 
270 
366 
747 
927 
558 
697 
2,447 
260 

1,760 
500 
170 
1,794 
480 
1,402 
1,214 
1,490 
1.017 
1.560 
633 
500 
649 



DATE (s) ACCEPTED 

1939 
1946 
1951 
1951 
1982 
1954 
1947 
1894 

1944 1953 1952 
1951 

1964 
1952 
1951 

1958 1971 
1979 

1954 
1951 
1960 
1989 

1959 1971 
1963 

1951 
1956 



Eames Street 
Edward Road 
Ella Avenue 
Elwood Road 
Emerson Street 
Englewood Drive 
Evans Drive 
Everett Avenue 



from Main Street to Woburn Street 
from Forest Street to beyond Baldwin Road 
from Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue 
from Forest Street 

from Faulkner Avenue to Oakwood Road 

from Kenwood Drive 

from Gunderson Road to Draper Drive 

from Faulkner Avenue to Cunningham Street 



3,200 
450 

1,043 
642 
590 
455 

2.071 
480 



1894 
1947 
1978 
1968 
1951 
1971 
1971 
1979 



Fairfield Road 
Fairmeadow Road 
Fairmont Avenue 
Fairview Avenue 
Faneuil Drive 
Faulkner Avenue 
Fay Street 
Federal Street 
Ferguson Road 
Flagstaff Road 
Fletcher Lane 
Floradale Avenue 
Fordham Road 
Forest Street 
Fox Run Drive 
Franklin Avenue 
Frederick Drive 
Freeport Drive 



from Main Street 1,299 1946 

from Nichols Street to Nichols Street 2.328 1958 

from Malloy Road 952 1971 

from State Street 648 1933 

from Massachusetts Ave. to beyond Harvard Ave. 790 1950 

from Glen Road to Jacobs Street 1,946 1944 

from Glen Road to Garden Avenue 714 1938 

from Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 5,740 1894 

from Shawsheen Avenue 1,073 1967 

from Nichols Street 587 1989 

from Kilmarnock Street to Morgan Road 792 1977 

from Burlington Avenue 627 1970 

from North Reading Line 3.714 1971 

from Burlington Avenue to Aldrich Road 4.100 1894 

from High Street 975 1989 

from Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue 739 1978 

from Salem Street 1.070 1966 

from Park Street to Lucaya Circle 2.086 1979 



1953 
1945 



1976 



Gandalf Way 
Gearty Street 
Glen Road 
Glendale Circle 
Glenview Road 
Gloria Way 
Gowing Road 
Grace Drive 
Grand Avenue 
Grant Street 
Great Neck Drive 
Grove Avenue 
Grove Street 



from Glen Road to Agostino Drive 549 1979 

from Ring Avenue 627 1989 

from Middlesex Avenue to Main Street 6.870 1894 

from Glen Road to Lawrence Street 1.304 1952 

from Suncrest Avenue 365 1959 

from Broad Street 770 1989 

from Park Street to Marcus Road 941 1956 

from Shawsheen Avenue to beyond Melody Lane 2.514 1966 

from Corey Avenue 815 1952 

from Federal Street 780 1943 

from Woburn Street 536 1989 

from Main Street to Lake Street 4,147 1910 

from Reading Line 120 1957 



-24- 



STREET 




LOCATION 


LENGTH 


DATE 


(s) ACCEPTED 


Gunderson Road 


from 


Marie Drive to beyond Evans Drive 


1 , 506 


1959 


1 966 




Haml i n Lane 


f rom 


Lawrence Street 


540 


1 962 






Hanover Street 


from 


Atlantic Avenue 


574 


1988 






Hanson Road 


f rom 


woouiana Koaa 


838 


1 969 






Hardin Street 


from 


Aldrich Road to Jaquith Road 


428 


1951 






Harnden Street 


from 


Main Street to Glen Road 


600 


1895 






Harold Avenue 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Reed Street 


1 ,312 


1971 






Harris Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Cedar Street 


806 


1945 






Harvard Avenue 


from 


Main Street to River Street 


430 


1951 






Hathaway Road 


from 


Woburn Street to Evans Drive 


3,270 


1951 


1953 


1959 


Hawthorne Road 


from 


Woburn Street 


230 


1956 






Heather Drive 


from 


Freeport Drive to North Reading Line 


1 , 286 


1979 






High Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 


3,585 


1894 






H i I Iside Way 


f rom 


Chestnut Street to Burlington Line 


2 , 230 


1914 






H i L I top Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


364 


1959 






Hobson Avenue 


from 


Pine Avenue to beyond Wisser Street 


1,560 


1945 


1951 


1952 


Hopkins Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


3,051 


1894 


1 972 


1 975 


Houghton Road 


f rom 


Kendall Street to Andrew Street 


1 , 702 


1 985 






Industrial Way 


f rom 


Woburn Street to West Street 


4 , 430 


1 974 






J aqu 1 th Road 


Trom 


Shawsheen Avenue 


1 398 


1 938 


1 949 


1 95 1 


Jere Road 


f rom 


Fairmeadow Road to Fairmeadow Road 


1 , 248 


1 968 






Jewel Drive 


f rom 


Eames Street 


1 303 








Jones Avenue 


from 


Glen Road 


717 


1 940 






Judith Road 


from 


Cedar Crest Road to Birchwood Road 


400 


1953 






Kajin Way 


f rom 


Woburn Street 


455 


1 989 






Kel ley Road 


f rom 


Chandler Road 


923 


1957 






Kenda 11 St reet 


f r om 


Aldrich Road to Blanchard Road 


1 ,420 








Kenwood Avenue 


f r om 


Woburn Street to beyond Englewood Drive 


1 , 725 


1 970 


1 971 




Kiernan Avenue 


f r om 


Lowell Street to beyond Naples Road 


693 


1 958 






Kilmarnock Street 


f r om 


West Street to beyond Morgan Road 










K 1 n9 S t reet 


from 


Glen Road to Broad Street 


2 400 


1 940 


1945 




King Street Ext. 


rom 


Glen Road 


487 


1 979 






K 1 1 K d L 1 L 


rom 


Main ^ t r o» t 


575 


1951 






Lake Street 


fr m 


Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 


3,855 


1894 






Lang Street 


fr m 


Bancroft Street 


409 


1952 






Laurel Avenue 


rom 


Parker Street to Molloy Road 


659 


1950 






Lawrence Court 


rom 


Lawrence Street 


728 


1956 






Lawrence Street 




Glen Road to Shady Lane Drive 


4 013 


1956 






Ledgewood Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


383 


1 959 






Lexington Street 


from 


Cunningham Street to Morningside Drive 


714 


1974 






Liberty Street 


from 


Federal Street 


740 


1943 






Lincoln Street 


f rom 


Federal Street 


720 


1 943 






Linda Road 


from 


High Street to beyond Pineridge Road 


1 , 760 


1 950 






Lloyd Road 


f rom 


Main Street 


1 , 050 


1 95 1 






Lockwood Road 


f r om 


Ballardvale Street 


977 


1 957 






Longview Road 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


650 


1 959 






Louinac Road 


f rom 


Drury Lane 


510 


1 963 






Loweii Dtreet 


from 


Main Street to Reading Line 


10 152 


1894 


1978 




Lowell otreet rarK 


trom 


LOWcll o^rcct 


580 


1 908 


1 957 


1958 


Lucaya Circle 


rom 


Heather Drive to Freeport Drive 


2 469 


1 979 






Mackey Road 


from 


Federal Street 


250 


1943 






Magazine Road 


from 


Wisser Street 


320 


1973 






Magazine Street 


from 


Taplin Avenue 


190 


1973 






Main Street 


from 


Tewksbury Line to Woburn Line 


21,387 


1894 






Marc i a Road 


from 


North Street to beyond Carolyn Road 


2,806 


1962 


1971 




Marcus Road 


from 


Gowing Road 


2,315 


1958 






Marie Drive 


from 


Woburn Street to beyond Gunderson Road 


1,525 


1961 


1966 




Marion Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to beyond Clifton St. 


1,876 


1945 






Marjorie Road 


from 


Main Street 


1,392 


1951 






Massachusetts Avenue 


from 


Main Street to beyond Brattle Street 


810 


1945 







-25- 



STREET 




LOCATION 


LENGTH 


DATE (s) ACCEPTED 


McDorold Rodd 


from 


Salem Street 


2,621 


1944 


Meadow Lane 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


'364 


1957 


Melody Lane 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Grace Drive 


245 


1966 


Middlesex Avenue 


from 


Main Street to Salem Street 


12, UO 


1894 


Mi les Street 


from 


Main Street to Hobson Avenue 


380 


1945 


Miller Road 


from 


Glen Road 


638 


1945 


Moore Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to beyond Wedgewood Ave. 


1,528 


1967 


Morgan Road 


from 


Kilmarnock Street 


653 


1977 


Morningside Drive 


from 


Lexington Street to Fairfield Road 


693 


1974 


Mors6 Av6nu6 




Woburn Street to beyond Lawn Street 


1 ,360 


1939 


Mystic Avenue 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


1^298 


1908 1988 


Nassau Avenue 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Dunton Road 


1,566 


1946 


Nathan Road 


from 


Senpek Road 


1,057 


1971 


Nichols Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to BiUerica Line 


3,801 


1894 


Nickerson Avenue 




West Street 


953 


1947 


Norfolk Avenue 


from 


Carter Lane to Nassau Avenue 


537 


1954 


North Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Marcia Road 


3,515 


1945 


North Washington Ave. 


from 


Agostino Drive 


858 


1979 


Nunn Road 


from 


Kelley Road 


2U 


1965 


Oak Street 


from 


Salem Street 


355 


1951 


Oakdale Road 


from 


Short Street to Judith Road 


2,301 


1950 


Oakridge Circle 


from 


Gowing Road to Cowing Road 


1 ,730 


1958 


Oakwood Road 


from 


Main Street to beyond Emerson Street 


800 


1946 


Olson Street 


from 


Church Street 


122 


1957 


Palmer Uay 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


1,437 


1989 


Park Street 


from 


Woburn Street to North Reading Line 


4,180 


1895 


Parker Street 


from 


Lowell Street to Blackstone Street 


2,000 


1919 


Patricia Circle 


from 


Dell Drive 


595 


1958 


Pershing Street 


from 


Federal Street 


720 


1943 


Phillips Avenue 


from 


Wild Avenue to beyond Baker Street 


1,519 


1946 1954 1981 


Pi Icher Drive 


across the end of Gearty Street 


'410 


1989 


Pi 1 1 ing Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


954 


1959 


Pine Avenue 


from 


Main Street to Hobson Avenue 


380 


1945 


Pineridge Road 


from 


North Street to Linda Road 


914 


1960 


Pine view Road 


from 


Cobalt Street to Adelman Road 


450 


1953 


Pinewood Road 


from 


Shady Lane Drive to Oakdale Road 


1 ,364 


1954 


Pleasant Road 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Linda Road 


750 


1962 


Powder House Circle 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


710 


1954 


Presidential Drive 


from 


Boutwell Street 


826 


1977 


Progress Way 


from 


Industrial Way 


630 


1974 


Radcliff Road 


from 


South Street to Benson Road 


355 


1971 


Rai I road Avenue 


from 


Clark Street 


650 


1909 


Reading Avenue 


f rom 


Oakwood Road 


215 


1979 


Redwood Terrace 


from 


Kenwood Avenue 


645 


1970 


Reed Street 


from 


Shawsheen Ave. to beyond Harold Ave. 


1 090 


1971 


Research Drive 


from 


Ballardvale Street 


l!817 


1989 


Richmond Street 


from 


Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 


1,800 


1973 


Ridge Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


365 


1956 


Ring Avenue 


from 


Salem Street to Biggar Avenue 


1,150 


1975 


River Street 


f rom 


Massachusetts Ave. to Harvard Avenue 


453 


1962 


Roberts Road 


f rom 


Burlington Avenue to Burlington Avenue 


1,861 


1967 


Rol I ins Ro3c) 


from 


Marion Street to Fenway Street 


200 


1954 


Roosevelt Road 


from 


Boutwell Street to Swain Road 


1,980 


1946 


Route 62 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Salem Street 


3,343 


1958 


Royal Street 


from 


Salem Street 


1,043 


1951 


Salem Street 


from 


Tewksbury Line to beyond Ballardvale St. 


8,895 


1894 


Salem Street 


from 


North Reading Line to beyond Woburn St. 


6,475 


1894 


Scaltrito Drive 


from 


Salem Street 


785 


1974 


School Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to beyond Drury Lane 


1,139 


1915 1963 


Senpek Road 


from 


Wildwood Street to Nathan Road 


280 


1971 


Sewell Road 


f rom 


Hathaway Road 


300 


1955 



-26- 



STREET 




LOCATION 


LENGTH 


DATE 


(s) ACCEPTED 


Shady Lane Drive 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Lawrence Street 


2,904 


1950 


1958 


Shawsheen Avenue 


from beyond Richard St. to Billerica Line 


11, 845 


1 894 




Sherburn Place 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


723 


1975 




Sheridan Road 


from 


Woburn Street to Hathaway Road 


1,021 


1951 


1971 


Sherwood Road 


from 


Forest Street to Cochrane Road 


445 


1971 




Si I ver Lake Avenue 


from 


Lake Street to Dexter Street 


455 


1954 




Sparhawk Drive 


from 


Park Street to Heather Drive 


361 


1979 




Sprucewood Road 


from Shady Lane Drive 


690 


1952 




State Street 


from 


Belmont Avenue to Fairview Avenue 


315 


1933 




Strout Avenue 


from 


Lowell Street 


908 


1955 




Suncrest Avenue 


from 


West Street to Ledgewood Road 


1 246 


1 954 




Swain Road 


from Burlington Avenue to Forest Street 


2^290 


1922 


1929 


1 aT L Koaa 


from 


Boutwell Street to Swain Road 


1 986 


1 VjO 




Taplin Avenue 


from 


Wisser Street 


'461 


1946 




Taplin Avenue 


from 


Baker Street 


900 


1946 




Temple Street 


from 


Church Street 


214 


1911 




Thrush Road 


from 


Salem Street to Marie Drive 


400 






Thurston Avenue 


from 


Church Street to beyond Kidder Place 


623 


1907 




Tomahawk Drive 


from 


Aldrich Road 


575 


1989 




Truman Road 


from Hathaway Road 


300 


1953 




Unnamed Street 


from 


Salem Street to Andover Street 


470 


1958 




Upton Court 


from 


Andover Street 


500 


1894 




Valyn Lane 


from 


Salem Street 


608 


1989 




Veranda Avenue 


from 


Main Street 


847 


1916 




Virginia Road 


from 


North Reading Line to North Reading Line 


1,105 


1954 




Walker Street 


from 


Main Street 


423 


1958 




Uarren Road 


from Wightman Road to Tewksbury Line 


97 


1954 




Washington Avenue 


from 


Clark Street to Stone Street 


1,650 


1920 




Webber Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue 


677 


1969 




Wedgewood Avenue 


from 


Moore Street 


476 


1967 




West Street 


from 


Woburn Street to Reading Line 


8,372 


1894 


1978 


Westdale Avenue 


from 


West Street 


1,211 


1942 




Wicks Circle 


from 


Everett Avenue 


533 


1971 




Wightman Road 


from 


Warren Road to Tewksbury Line 


239 


1954 




Wi Id Avenue 


from 


Grove Avenue 


1,050 


1910 




Wi Idwood Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 


5,290 


1894 




Willi ams Avenue 


from 


Main Street 


706 


1940 




Wi Ison Street 


from 


Federal Street 


760 


1943 




Wilton Drive 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


1,151 


1966 




Winchell Road 


from 


Grove Avenue to Burnap 


193 


1945 




Wing Road 


from 


Woburn Street 


746 


1958 




Wisser Street 


from 


Main Street to Brand Avenue 


1,146 


1950 




Woburn Street 


from 


Andover Street to Woburn Line 


23,122 


1894 


1978 


Woodland Road 


from 


Lowell Street 


1,174 


1969 





Animal Control Officer 



Animals Returned to Owners 


81 


Reimbursement from County $ 


663 


Animals Adopted 


34 


Kennel Fees 


725 


Animals Killed by Vehicles 


75 


Fines 1 


,620 


Animals Euthanized (vicious. 


1 


Animals Quarantined 


23 


unadoptable) 




Barn Inspection 


40 


Total Animals Picked Up 


133 


Number of Horses (work or saddle) 


93 


Animals in Kennel 


1,045 


Number of Ponies 


30 


Dogs Licensed 


1,358 


Number of Goats 


6 


Number of Written Warnings 


55 


Number of Beef Cows 


2 



Number of Poultry 17 



27- 



Redevelopment Authority 



In 1989, the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority (WRA) made significant progress in its efforts to 
coordinated with the Massachusetts Department of Public Works to develop a compatible bridge replacement 
plan and the long range traffic improvements for the Town Center Project and the Route 129 corridor. 

Through a series of staff planning sessions, representatives of the town, the state and the Authority were 
able to work out a plan of action for going forward with the Town Center Project planning effort in 
conjuntion with the Commonwealth's bridge replacement project for the intersection of Routes 38/129 and 62. 
It is anticipated that the major activity for 1990 will be the preparation of preliminary design plans by 
Authority engineering consultants in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Public Works. 

In 1989, the Town of Wilmington experienced a financial emergency because it was unable to fund its proposed 
budget. The Board of Selectmen and School Committee requested that the Authority help the town by providing 
emergency funds to the Town to offset revenue shortages. The Authority voted to grant a gift to the town in 
the sum of $110,685 to help the community meet its financial emergency. 

The members of the Authority voted for the grant on the basis that necessary Authority funds could be 
provided at the time for emergency relief for the town and, as the Authority needed replacement of the funds 
to carry on its proposed work plan, the town would be in a better position financially to replace funds as 
requi red. 

In 1989, the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority saw Carl A. Backman, Jr. re-elected to another five-year 

term by the voters of Wilmington. The opening created by the resignation of the Governor's appointee, 

C. Nicki Johnson, in 1988 has yet to be filled. The officers of the Authority are as follows: Jay Donovan, 

Chairman; Vaughn Surprenant, Vice Chairman; Carl A. Backman, Jr., Treasurer and Sidney Kaizer, Assistant 

Treasurer. 

Besides the work undertaken on the Town Center Project, the Town of Wilmington continues to reap the 
benefits of its investment in the Jewel Industrial Park more than 20 years ago. At the end of 1989, there 
were 11 businesses operating in Jewel Park employing a total of 933 workers. Based upon Fiscal Year 1989 
data, provided by the Assessor's Office, the total assessed value of the park was $20,222,900 and the annual 
tax revenue to the Town of Wilmington totalled $323,768. 



Recycling Advisory Committee 



The committee was appointed by the Town Manager in June of 1989. Its mission is to prepare "a 

recommendation regarding the specific steps that Wilmington should take to develop an effective 

recycling program." 

Committee members presented a recommendation to the Board of Selectmen and the Town Manager in August 
addressing that mandate. After examining alternative approaches, the Wilmington Recycling Advisory 
Committee (WRAC) suggested establishing a voluntary drop-off recycling program. Five sites in Wilmington 
were considered. The WRAC recommended the existing site off Old Main Street. It was estimated that the 
town could remove 550 tons of trash from the waste stream within one year. 

With approval from the Board of Selectmen, committee members worked with representatives from Waste 
Management Essex County, the town's solid waste hauler, to arrange for storage and removal of recyclables. 
Waste Management provided two roll-off containers to the town at no charge. They also agreed to transport 
the materials at a cost of $125 per truckload. 

October H, 1989 was the grand opening for the recycling drop-off center. Thanks to the efforts of the 
Public Works Department the drop-off area was graded, paved and fenced in. The drop-off center is open each 
Saturday from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Volunteers staff the site. Newspaper, glass bottles, aluminum cans 
and pie pans, leaves and Christmas trees are currently accepted at the site. To date over 345 tons of 
material has been brought to the site. 



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The WRAC is currently working to expand the types of material which can be accepted at the recycling 
drop-off center. In addition, the committee is preparing an environmental fair to be held in honor of Earth 
Day on Saturday, April 21st. 

Members of the WRAC deserve a tremendous amount of credit for their tireless efforts and 
determination. WRAC members are: Thomas Olilla, Esta Browning, Stephen Sabounjian, Elizabeth Harriman, 
Jonathan Goldfield and Robert Palmer, The volunteers also deserve a great deal of credit for their efforts 
to make recycling in Wilmington a success. 

Recycling truly is an easy way for each one of us to save the environment and to save tax dollars. 



The Strategic Management Committee is submitting its second annual report. This committee was established 
to guide the development and execution of strategies aimed at addressing long-term problems or opportunities 
of a townwide nature. Five issues were defined as being of a priority nature which warranted immediate 
attention: affordable housing, community development, financial management; school facilities; human 
resources. These issues were brought forward from 1988 with some revisions. Five task forces have been 
created to address each of the five issues. Each task force is developing a set of actions to be carried 
out in FY-1991. These action lists will define specific steps which Town departments will be required to 
initiate in order to move closer to the desired end results. Each year the work of the task forces and 
their strategies will be reviewed. Input from the public will be solicited. The Strategic Management 
Committee will decide what, if any, changes should be made to the strategies to reflect the needs of the 
community at that point in time. 

A major benefit resulting from this program has been the increased communication between departments. Each 
month the Town Manager, Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, Chairman of the School Committee, School 
Superintendent, Chairman of the Finance Committee and the Town Moderator meet. These sessions have been 
very beneficial in terms of providing some of the key people in Wilmington town government with an 
opportunity to discuss issues of critical importance to the town. 

Each task force is pursuing a specific course of action, a strategy, to address its issue. Those strategies 
are recapped below: 

1. Affordable Housing - Press forward on a step by step basis to create the necessary tools and incentives 
using our regulatory powers, town surplus land, and a nonprofit affordable housing corporation. Stress 
public information and education concerning the need for affordable housing. 

2. Financial Management - Produce long range, 3 to 5 year revenue and expenditure projections and promote 
high quality non-residental development where appropriate, while continuing to control costs. 

3. Community Development - Consideration should be given to expanding the three-pronged strategy outlined 
for the suburban character issue. In addition to a beautif ication program, resource protection measures 
such as aquifer protection and recycling should be included in a broader strategy to protect resources of 
both aesthetic and environmental value. 

4. Human Relations - Build a performance management system which includes clear goals, objectives and job 
performance standards, provides training and support and emphasizes a comprehensive reward system. This 
system will embrace all committees, managers and employees. 

5. School Facilities - Identify space needs and means to address those needs over the next 3 to 5 years and 
develop a systematic approach to monitoring and responding to feedback on the cleanliness and condition 
of school buildings. 

The following people serve on the Strategic Management Committee: Town Moderator, Finance Committee 
Chairman, a representative of the Planning Board, School Superintendent and the Town Manager. The Chairmen 
of the School Committee and Board of Selectmen are ex-officio members. The Planning Director and Assistant 
Town Manager serve as support staff. 

The committee welcomes comments or questions you might have regarding the Strategic Management Program. You 
may contact the Town Manager by phone or in writing. 




Committee 



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Board of Health 



The Board of Health consists of three members appointed by the Town Manager for three year terms. Serving 
on the Board throughout 1989 were: Dr. James Ficociello, D.D.S., One Fletcher Lane; Joseph Paglia, 101 
Nichols Street; Hilton Calder, 14 Hobson Avenue. The Director of Public Health is Gregory P. Erickson R.S. 
C.H.O., and the Public Health Nurse is Ann FitzGerald. The secretarial staff (which is shared with the 
Building Inspector) consists of Joan Goulet and Toni LaRivee. In addition, part-time help has been employe 
as needed to cover some of the field inspections required. 

The annual Rabies Clinic was held at the Department of Public Works on Andover Street. 

I 

One of the goals for this year was to implement the ticketing system for violations of health regulations ij 
the Town of Wilmington. In accomplishing this, the entire history of regulations needed to be reviewed ana 
revised. This has been completed and the ticketing system is now part of the operating procedure of the 
Board of Health. 

The annual flu clinic was held on October 14, 1989, the total number of flu shots given was 692 including 
clinics, distribution to Wilmington Woods, office, and home visits. Twenty-four flu shots were given out ii 
evening hours, 14 pneumonia shots have been given also. 

Personnel in the Wilmington Fire and Police Departments, school nurses and the public health nurse received 
3 vaccinations each against Hepatitis B, total was 125. 

Board of Health nurse participated in the annual senior clinic at the high school giving TD vaccine and 
Mantoux testing. 

The nurse also participated in a Cardiac Fitness Program for the Wilmington town employees and looks forwar 
to beginning testing in January, 1990. Interest in cardiovascular health is reflected in the cholesterol 
screening program, 148 clients, 77 new, and 71 returnees with total 379 tests run on the DT60 Analyzer. 

The Board of Health purchased a new portable Glucometer Accucheck II machine for use in office, home, and 
senior center. One hundred-one tests were done in 1989 for diabetes mellitus. 

Home visits for nursing care, injections, communicable disease follow-up totaled 312. 

The nurse has attended 2 cholesterol workshops, 1 hypertension workshop and has attended AIDS programs. 
Aids education will be a priority in programs for the coming year. 



A. Communicable Disease Control: 



1 . Immuni zat i ons 90 
Office visits 678 (flu) 
Home Visits 14 (flu) 

2. Communicable Disease Reported 78 
Home visits 4 



Tuberculosis Report 7 
Office visits 165 
Home visits 2 



B. Public Health Nursing: 

1 . Premature births reported 
Home visits 

2. Morbidity 

V.N. A. calls 53 

Office visits 40 

3. Newborn Infants 
Home visits 

4. General Health Supervision 

Home visits 239 

Office visits (injections, weights) 137 



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5. 



Hypertension Screening 
Office visits 



465 



6. Diabetic Screening 

Office visits 21 

Attendance at monthly clinic 8 
Fees collected $21.00 

7. Senior Citizen Counseling at Drop- In-Center 

Number of sessions 48 

Hypertension Screening 500 

Diabetic Screening 80 

General Health (Injections) 13 
Fees collected $80.00 

8. Lead Paint Test 

Number tested 4 

9. Kodak Analyzer Testing (Risk Assessment 148 
Fees Collected Counseling) $1,082.00 

10. Pneumovax 14 
Fees Collected $70.00 

11. Hepatitis B - Vaccine Given 125 
Fees Collected 

12. Meetings 30 

13. TOTAL FEES COLLECTED $1,253.00 
Environmental Health : 

1. Transportation 2 
Stable 7 
Miscellaneous ^ 
Perk 159 
Sewerage 338 
Food A5 
Milk 2 
Installers 25 
Subdivisions 2 
Haulers 11 
Total Fees Collected $17,980.00 

2. Meetings Attended 84 

3. Sewerage 

Inspect ions/ Investigations 287 

4. Number of plans reviewed 176 

5. Food Establishments 

Inspections '8 

6. Food Establishments 

Re- inspections *5 

7. Nuisance Complaints Inspection 59 

8. Nuisance/Complaints 

Re- inspect ions 27 

9. Housing Inspections * 
10. Housing Re- i nspect i ons ' 



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11. Percolation/Water Test 403 

12. Court Appearance 8 

13. Court Re-appearance 3 

14. Hazardous Waste Investigations 12 

15. Camp Inspections 

16. Miscellaneous Inspections 34 



The Wilmington Family Counseling Service, Inc., is a non-profit clinic providing counseling and therapy 
services to residents of Wilmington under a contract with the town. Fees for residents are set on a slidingi 
scale from $5 to $50 depending upon income and number of dependents in a family. Town funds help to 
subsidize these fees. Services are provided to people with a wide range of problems from adults with 
symptoms of anxiety or depression to runaway teenagers and unmanageable children to adolescents and adults 
with substance abuse problems to couples who are on the verge of ending their marriage. 



171 Client-families received service in 1989 
73 New client-families received service in 1989 
49 Client-families returned for further service in 1989 



10% Increase from 1988 in the number of client-families receiving service 



Primary Presenting Problems: 



41% Adults with Personal -Emotional Problems 

15X Marital Problems 

13X Child Adjustment/Management Problems 

12X Adolescent Adjustment/Management Problems 

19% Drug and Alcohol Abuse 



1900 Scheduled counseling and therapy sessions in 1989. 



Sixty-eight percent increase in 1988 in the amount of consultation with the schools, agencies, and other 
programs about specific clients and also to assess problems in the community and develop programs to meet 
them. As an outgrowth of this consultation a new partnership program was started in the Wilmington Public 
Schools for 16 high school students at risk of dropping out of school. Other partnership programs are being 
developed for 1990. 

Fifty-six percent increase in the number of group therapy sessions from 39 in 1988 to 61 in 1989. These 
groups were for adult children of alcoholics and at the high school for students at risk of dropping out of 
school. 



Percentage of Appointments by Client Income 



Weekly 
Under $150 
$151 - $300 
$301 - $450 
$451 - $600 
$601 - $750 
Over $750 



Yearly 
(Max. $ 7,800) 
(Max. $15,600) 
(Max. $23,400) 



21% 
19X 
18X 
11X 
17X 
14X 



'Massachusetts Poverty Level for 
Fami ly of 1 - $11,213 
Family of 2 - $15,038 
Fami ly of 4 - $22,688 



Fifty percent or more of our clients are at or below the poverty level for a family of 4 in Massachusetts. 



•Information provided by the Secretary of State's Office. 



$8.58 cost to the Town per scheduled appointment up only 3.6X from $8.28 per scheduled appointment in 1988. 



Every $1.00 the Town contributes generates $6.52 worth of service. 



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Town Counsel 



On January 1, 1990, there were pending the following actions by or against the Town (exclusive of 
actions in which the Town was merely summoned as trustee, and in which it had no interest, and of tax lien 
foreclosure proceedings in the Land Court and petitions for abatement before the Appellate Tax Board*). 

Beatrice G. Swenson v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Middlesex Superior Court (petition for assessment of 
damages for land talcing) 

Harvey Lobdell v. Board of Appeals . Middlesex Superior Court (petition in equity for appeal for variance 
by zoning by-laws) 

Androniki Gaglione v. Thomas B. Brennan. et al . Middlesex Superior Court (petition for assessment of 
damages) 

Joseph Scaro. et al v. County of Middlesex, et al . Middlesex Superior Court (petition for assessment of 
damages for land taking) 

John E. Hayward. et al v. County of Middlesex, et al . Middlesex Superior Court (petition for assessment 
of damages for land taking) 

John E. Hayward. et al v. County of Middlesex, et al. Middlesex Superior Court (petition for assessment 
of damages for land taking) 

Robert Stevens. Tr. v. Town of Wilmington and Planning Board . Land Court (petition for registration and 
claim to Swain Court - private way) 

Sanborn Brothers. Inc. v. Town of Wilmington . District Court of Lowell (action for property damage - 
negl i gence) 

George Anderson, et al v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Middlesex Superior Court (claim for personal injury) 

School Teacher v. Wilmington School Committee . Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (complaint of 
discrimination as to benefits) 

John J. Lyons, et al v. Town of Wilmington . Land Court (complaint to determine validity and extent of 
the zoning by-laws of the Town of Wilmington) 

Frances Dec v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination (complaint 
alleging sex discrimination) 

Dorothy A. Cosman v. Town of Wilmington . Middlesex Superior Court (claim for personal injury) 

Fosters Pond Improvement Association. Inc. et al v. Aldo Caira. et al . Middlesex Superior Court (action 
in the nature of certiorari for decision of Board of Selectmen granting earth removal permit) 

Ruth J. Gronemeyer. Exec, v. George R. Allen, et al . Middlesex Superior Court (complaint for assessment 
of damages) 

James Rooney v. Sterling C. Morris, et al . Municipal Court of the City of Boston (appeal from decision 
of Civil Service Commission sustaining appointing authority) 

George Donovan, et al v. Bruce MacDonald. et al . Middlesex Superior Court (appeal from the decision of 
the Board of Appeals denying variance to construct a single family dwelling) 

Toftn of Wilmington v. AFSCME. Council 93 . Middlesex Superior Court (complaint for declaratory judgment 
to determine rights) 

A. John Imbimbo. et al v. Bruce MacDonald. et al . Middlesex Superior Court (appeal from the decision of 
the Board of Appeals) 

Jeanette Iverson. et al v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Middlesex Superior Court (claim for personal 
injury and consequential damages) 

Town of Wilmington v. Robert Corey, aka. et al . Middlesex Superior Court (complaint alleging violation 
of Town Zoning By-Law and Inland Wetland Act) 



33- 



Dianna Holmes, et al v. Town of Wilmington . Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination (complaint 
for discrimination in violation of Chapter 151B) 

AFSCME. Council 93. AFL-CIO v. Town of Uilmington . Board of Conciliation and Arbitration (petition for 
mediation and fact finding) 

M & P Pipeiacking Corp. v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Middlesex Superior Court (complaint in equity 
restraining the Town from paying Pitt for monies alleged to be due on Contract #6) 

Clarence T. Bryant, et al v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex 
(claim for personal injury) 

Ruth E. Marranzini. et al v. Bruce MacDonald. et al . Middlesex Superior Court (appeal from the decision 
of the Board of Appeals) 

Frances Dec v. Town of Wilmington . Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (claim for sex discrimination) 

Wilmington Town Employees Association v. Town of Wilmington . Labor Relations Commission (claim for 
grievance) 

William Baldwin, ppa. et al v. Town of Wilmington . Middlesex Superior Court (claim for personal injury) 

Jean Beninati v. Town of Wilmington . Middlesex Superior Court (claim for breach of contract) 

James Tighe v. Charles P. Lawrenson . Middlesex Superior Court (claim for violation of civil rights and 
for mandamus to require the Building Inspector to issue a building permit) 

Ralph Fiore Bus Service. Inc. v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Middlesex Superior Court (complaint under 
Mass. Antitrust Act, G.L.c.93) 

Town of Wilmington v. Alice Papaliolios . Middlesex Superior Court (violation of G.L.c.UO, S.136A, 
operating a kennel) 

Town of Wilmington v. Weston & Sampson, et al . Suffolk Superior Court (claim by insurer for 
reimbursement of insurance loss) 

Town of Wilmington v. Reading Municipal Light Department . Department of Public Utilities (petition for 
investigation of rates of the RMLD) 

Joyce Corey v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Middlesex Superior Court (claim for violation of civil rights 
and injunctive relief) 

In Re : Robert J. Vassallo . Hearing Before Appointing Authority Concerning Disciplinary Charges. 
Reduction in rank to patrolman found by the Appointing Authority, after hearing, (on appeal to Civil 
Service Commission), decision of appointing authority affirmed; matter currently on appeal to Boston 
Municipal Court. 

Viola Berglund v. Town of Wilmington . Land Court (respondent's objection to plan filed with petition). 

John T. Bresnahan. et al v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Land Court (complaint to quiet title) 

The 20 Lowell Street Realty Trust. Charles F. Williams. Jr.. Trustee, et al. v. Bruce MacDonald. et als . 
Middlesex Superior Court (appeal from the decision of the Board of Appeals) 

The 20 Lowell Street Realty Trust. Charles F. Williams. Jr.. Trustee, et al. v. Bruce MacDonald. et als . 
Middlesex Superior Court (appeal from the decision of the Board of Appeals) 

The 20 Lowell Street Realty Trust. Charles F. Williams. Jr.. Trustee, et al. v. Bruce MacDonald. et als . 
Middlesex Superior Court (appeal from the decision of the Board of Appeals) 

The 20 Lowell Street Realty Trust. Charles F. Williams. Jr.. Trustee, et al. v. Bruce MacDonald. et als . 
Middlesex Superior Court (appeal from the decision of the Board of Appeals) 

Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority v. Town of Wilmington . Middlesex Superior Court (complaint 
for declaratory judgment) 

Town of Wilmington v. Town of Reading Municipal Light Department . Department of Public Utilities 
(petition for review of Reading Municipal Light Department rates) 



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James Bruce. Administrator, et at v. Clifford A. Singelais. et al. Middlesex Superior Court (third party 
tort action for claim of negligence) 

Richard J. Law, et al v. Neil Buckley, et al. Middlesex Superior Court (appeal from the decision of the 
Zoning Board of Appeals) 

Aleppo Temple Shrine Activities. Inc. v. Rocco V. DePasguale. et al. Board of Selectmen. Middlesex 
Superior Court, (action in the nature of certiorari and declaratory judgment resulting from denial of earth 
removal permit by the Board of Selectmen) 

Wilmington Fire Fighters. I.A.F.F.. Local #1370 v. Town of Wilmington. Labor Relations Commission 
(grievance of union president) 

Michelle A. Carbone. ppa. et al v. William Clifford. Administrator of the Estate of Mary E. Clifford, v. 
Town of Wilmington, et al . Middlesex Superior Court (action for wrongful death pursuant to G.L.c.229, s.2 
and third party claim G.L.C.231B) 

Charles Stokes, et al v. Town of Wilmington, et al. Middlesex Superior Court (action to construct sewer 
on Jacobs Street subject to the Betterment Act) 

Robert McSweeney v. Bruce MacDonald. et al. Middlesex Superior Court (action for appeal of a decision of 
the Board of Appeals and claims under the Massachusetts Constitution and Title 42, section 1983, U.S.C.) 

Michael Sullivan, et al v. Philip Murphy, et al. Middlesex Superior Court, (action for appeal from 
decision of Board of Appeals) 

Wilmington Arboretum Apts. Associates Limited Partnership v. Board of Appeals of the Town of Wilmington. 
Department of Community Affairs, Housing Appeals Committee (appeal from a decision of the Zoning Board of 
Appeals denying comprehensive permit) 

Warren Atkinson v. Wilmington School Committee, et al. Middlesex Superior Court (appeal under Chapter 
71, section A3A - motion for relief from judgment of dismissal referred to master) 

Roger Letu. et al v. Anthony C. Cammarata. Bruce MacDonald. et al . Middlesex Superior Court (appeal from 
the decision of the Board of Appeals granting variance) 

AFSCME. Council 93 v. Town of Wilmington . American Arbitration Association (claim for grievance) 

Joseph Guzzo v. Bruce MacDonald. et al . Middlesex Superior Court (action for appeal from decision of 
Board of Appeals. 

Michael McCoy, et al v. Corcoran Jennison Co.. Inc.. et al . Middlesex Superior Court (Appeal of three 
decisions of the Zoning Board of Appeals) 

Philip T. Murphy, et al v. Bruce MacDonald. et al . Middlesex Superior Court (appeal from decision of 
Board of Appeals) 

Terry L. McKenna v. Town of Wilmington . Civil Service Commission (claim for denial of employment because 
of alleged physical handicap) 

Terry L. McKenna v. Town of Wilmington . Middlesex Superior Court (action for alleged discrimination and 
damages) 

AFSCME. Council 93 v. Town of Wilmington . American Arbitration Association (grievance for docked pay) 

George C. Nelson, et al v. Bruce MacDonald. et al . Middlesex Superior Court (appeal from decision of 
Board of Appeals) 

IBPO. 318 V. Town of Wilmington . American Arbitration (demand for arbitration re-early retirement) 

Sandra L. Murphy v. Town of Wilmington . Division of Employment Security (claim for unemployment 
compensation) 

Charles Sullivan v. Bruce MacDonald. et al . Middlesex Superior Court (appeal from decision of Board of 
Appeals) 

Robert Anderson v. Reginald S. Stapczynski. et al . Boston Municipal Court Department (petition for 
judicial review of the Civil Service Commission) 



-35- 



Max Johnson v. Bruce MacDonald. et al . Middlesex Superior Court (appeal from decision of Board of 
Appeals) 

Ernestine McVicker. et al v. Town of Wilmington, et al (Middlesex Superior Court (claim for personal 
injury) 

Town of Wilmington v. SWS Industries. Inc.. et al . United States District Court (claim on bid bond il 
concerning high school window replacement) jl 

Town of Wilmington v. Joseph Lundergan. et al . Middlesex Superior Court (complaint for certiorari) 

(b)(1) During the year 1989, the following new actions were brought against the Town of Wilmington or 
its officers or agents: 

Brentwood Enterprise Trust v. Board of Appeals of the Town of Wilmington . Department of Community 
Affairs, Housing Appeals Committee (appeal to Housing Appeals Committee from denial of comprehensive permit) 

Brentwood Enterprise Trust v. Board of Appeals of the Town of Wilmington . Middlesex Superior Court, 
(appeal from decision of the board of Appeals denying comprehensive permit) 

Robert Andersen, et al v. Reginald S. Stapczynski. et al . Middlesex Superior Court (complaint seeking 
equiptable relief relative to G.L.C.U9, s. 19B) 

IBPO. 318 V. Town of Wilmington . American Arbitration (claims for grievance) 

Maryanne Stone v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (claim or unfair 
and deceptive practice by Town relating to her Blue Cross/Blue Shield coverage, after termination) 

Joseph Raetano v. Planning Board of the Town of Wilmington . Middlesex Superior Court (appeal of decisioni 
of the Planning Board) 

IBPO. 318 V. Town of Wilmington . American Arbitration (claim for grievance) 

Mark D. Nelson v. Board of Health of the Town of Wilmington, et al . Middlesex Superior Court (complaint 
alleging claims for review of agency decision and tort damages) 

Thomas J. Smith, et al v. Town of Wilmington . Land Court, (petition for registration involving private 
way - official map street) 

Carl J. Marcy v. Town of Wilmington . Department of Employment and Training, (claim for unemployment 
compensation) 

Richard Stuart. Trustee, et al v. Board of Appeals of the Town of Wilmington . Land Court (Appeal of 
decisions of Board of Appeals denying reconsideration of a prior decision, denial of variances and denial of 
applications concerning official map (C.41, S.81E)) 

IBPO. 318 V. Town of Wilmington . American Arbitration (claim for grievance) 

Stanton H. Zarrow. et al. Trustees v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Land Court Department (a petition for 
declaratory judgment and determination of validity of zoning by-law concerning land located in Woburn with 
proposed access in Wilmington) 

(b) (2) During the year 1989, the following new actions were brought by or on behalf of the Town: 

Town of Wilmingto n v. Don H. Townlev . Land Court (petition to vacate tax title foreclosure) 

*There are pending as of January I, 1990, 64 separate petitions for abatements before the Appellate Tax 
Board, many involving claims for several different years. 1 

(c) During the year 1989, the following actions by or against the Town were disposed of: ] 

Michael McCoy, et al v. Cor coran Jennison Co.. Inc.. et at . Middlesex Superior Court (defendant's motion 
to dismiss allowed by Court) 

AFSCME. Council 93 v. Town of Wilmington . American Arbitration Association (disposed of by dismissal and 
clarifying directive from Chief of Police) 



-36- 



Town of Wilmington v. SWS Industries. Inc.. et al . United States District Court (disposed of by 
dismissal with prejudice, ordered by the Court) 

Town of Wilmington v. Weston & Sampson, et al . Suffolk Superior Court (disposed of by settlement in the 
amount of $11,500.00 to reimburse Town for deductible and expenses) 

IBPO. 318 V. Town of Wilmington . American Arbitration (disposed of by withdrawal of grievance by 
grievant) 

Warren Atkinson v. Wilmington School Committee, et al . Middlesex Superior Court (disposed of by School 
Committee requesting private counsel prior to trial/advised case was settled) 

Robert E. Vassal lo v. Civil Service Commission, et al . Boston Municipal Court (disposed of by appellant 
withdrawing his appeal of the decision of Civil Service) 

Viola Berglund v. Town of Wilmington . Land Court (disposed of by stipulation of dismissal with 
prejudice, agreed to by both parties) 

Ernestine McVicker. et al v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Middlesex Superior Court (disposed of by 
settlement by Town's insurer in the amount of $2,500.00 and stipulation of dismissal with prejudice filed) 

James Rooney v. Sterling C. Morris, et al. Municipal Court of the City of Boston (disposed of by 
dismissal under Rule 41(b)(2) (lack of prosecution) 

John T. Bresnahan. et al v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Land Court disposed of by compromise and 
settlement between neighbors). 

Sandra L. Murphy v. Town of Wilmington . Division of Employment Security/Board of Review (disposed of by 
decision of Board of Review that the applicant was not entitled to benefits) 

Brentwood Enterprise Trust v. Board of Appeals of the Town of Wilmington. Middlesex Superior Court, 
(disposed of by Board of Appeal's motion to dismiss allowed by the Court) 

Joseph Guzzo v. Bruce MacDonald. et al . Middlesex Superior Court (disposed of by agreement for judgment 
disposing of contested issues) 

Town of Wilmington v. Alice Papal iolios . Middlesex Superior Court (disposed of by dismissal because of 
mootness) 

Maryanne Stone v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (disposed of by 
settlement made by Blue Cross/Blue Shield - no expense to Town) 

Carl J. Marcy v. Town of Wilmington . Department of Employment and Training, Board of Review (appeal from 
Decision of Commissioner is dismissed) 



-37- 



Historical Commission 



The Wilmington Historical Commission is pleased to announce that the West Schoolhouse on Shawsheen Avenue 
was placed in nomination for the National Register of Historic Places by the Massachusetts Historical 
Commission. The National Register of Historic Places is the federal government's official list of historic 
properties worthy of preservation. Listing in the National Register provides recognition and assists in 
preserving our nation's heritage. 

One of the town's historic properties, the Old South School on Chestnut Street, has been leased by the town 
to the Marine Corps League. In cooperation with the Historical Commission, the League has worked to 
preserve the exterior while remodeling the building to fit their needs. 

The Commission continues its quest for recognition of our historical buildings around the town common area. 
Application has been made to the Massachusetts Historical Commisssion for a federal survey and planning 
grant for the Wilmington Centre Village National Historic District project. 

Protection and preservation of historical properties throughout our town continues to be our goal. In 
accordance with this, we have worked with town officials and Station Development Corporation to preserve the 
Wilmington Town Pound (18U) and Scalekeepers Building (1830); both located on Glen Road. 

The Historic Plaque program continued with more plaques being prepared and placed on historical properties 
throughout the town. 

We received from the Dublin Historical Society in New Hampshire an original promissory note which originated 
in Wilmington in 1748. It is now on display at the Harnden Tavern. 

The Commission continued its program of cataloging articles in the Tavern. 

The Harnden Tavern Open House program continues on the first Sunday of each month. Informative historical 
tours are offered by our tenants, Josh and Lisa Winant. There is much more on display at the Tavern thanks 
to the activity of the Friends of the Harnden Tavern. Many historical artifacts were purchased at local 
auctions; including the AUgrove and Buck estates. The Friends also held successful Strawberry, Harvest and 
Christmas socials. 

The Public Buildings Department has continued to cooperate to preserve the Harnden Tavern and Carriage House. 

Memberships in the National Trust for Historic Preservation and Historic Massachusetts have been renewed. 

The Wilmington Historical Commission wishes to thank the many town departments which have assisted us 
throughout 1989 in the preservation and maintenance of Wilmington's historic buildings. 

The Commission meets on the second Monday of the month at the Town Hall, Room 4, 7:30 p.m. 



On May 4, 1989, the Carter Committee presented the Retired Men's Band of Wakefield. The retired musicians 
performed a wide range of selections from marching band and concert to symphony and theater. It was an 
interesting and diversified program, which was well received. 

In the 80th anniversary year of the Carter Lecture Committee, we offer a brief history, from the first 
records of the Committee. 

The donor, Mrs. Sarah Davis (Jaquith) Carter, was born in Wilmington on March 24, 1832, daughter of Joshua 
and Sabra (Cowing) Jaquith of the stock of early settlers of the town. She was married to Cyrus Lewis 
Carter on February 5, 1874 in Wilmington, and died in Wilmington on November 28, 1907. 




-38- 




Following is the bequest contained in Mrs. Carter's will, which bore the date of November 26, 1907, and was 
admitted to Probate in Middlesex County on December 24, 1907: 

"Eleventh: I give and bequeath to the Town of Wilmington the sum of Six Thousand Dollars, in trust 
to invest the principal sum and to expend the income in maintaining courses of lectures for the 
benefit of the people of Wilmington. I direct that the principal of this fund shall be invested 
only in such securities as may be a lawful investment for Savings Banks in this Commonwealth except 
that it shall not be loaned on the security of individual names. And should the principal of said 
trust be lessened by depreciation in the value of the securities in which the investment may 
be made, or by losses, then the income accruing from the investments shall be allowed to accumulate 
and to be capitalized until the fund shall be restored to its original value of Six Thousand Dollars." 

Town Meeting, March 1, 1909 - At the request of the Executor of Mrs. Carter's will, the warrant for the Annual 
Town Meeting in Wilmington on March 1, 1909 contained the following: 

"Article 18: To see if the Town will vote to accept the bequest contained in the will of the late 
Sarah D. J. Carter, and determine how the same shall be cared for." 

The Town Clerk's record of the meeting tells of the following action: 

"Article 18: On motion it was unanimously voted that the Town of Wilmington accept the 
legacy of Mrs. Sarah D. J. Carter, and that the same be placed in the hands of the Board 
of Trustees of Trust Funds for Investment, and the income derived therefrom be paid 
annually to a committee consisting of five members. . . ." 

The current Carter Committee may be unable to schedule a program for 1990 until the renovations to the high 
school auditorium have been completed. 



I respectfully submit my Annual Report for the year 1989. 

Highlights of projects completed during 1989: 

New pollution control furnace installed at D.P.W. garage. System runs on old motor oil. 

New light fixtures installed in cafeteria and corridors at the North Intermediate School. 

o New steel exit doors were installed at the Shawsheen Street School. 

Handicapped ramp was constructed at the Arts Council building. 

Repaired and refinished cafeteria stage floor at the North Intermediate School. 

Voting machines were programmed for Special Town Meeting. 

Enclosure constructed for rear entrance at the Senior Citizens Center. 

o New underground oil tanks were installed at the Boutwell Street School, Shawsheen Street School, 
North Intermediate School, West Intermediate School, Town Hall and the Memorial Library. 

The AHERA (Asbestos Hazard Response Act) Program, mandated by the federal government, was completed 
for all school buildings. A copy of this report is on file in each school building and at the 
Public Buildings office. 

Painting of the interior/exterior of various town and school buildings continues. 

Plumbing and electrical fixtures have been repaired or replaced in various locations as needed. 

Doors and door hardware have been replaced or repaired in various locations as needed. 

Food, supplies, furniture, and equipment have been picked up and delivered as required. 

I gratefully acknowledge the support of the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, School Administration and all 
personnel of the Public Buildings Department. 




-39- 



Recreation Department 



i 



Wilmington's Recreation Department continued to provide a wide variety of leisure time activities for local | 
citizens during calendar year 1989. \ 

Although our department is relatively small, with only two full time employees, it represents the second > 
largest industry in the nation. In fact, Americans spend about 12 percent of their personal income on j 
recreation. ' 

The Recreation Commission consists of five volunteer citizens appointed by the Town Manager. This board 
functions in a policy making and advisory capacity to the Director. 

The Recreation Commission and Director keep in mind the following departmental objectives as they plan and 
conduct recreation programs throughout the year: 

To provide opportunities for self expression. 
To develop a sense of personal worth. 

To provide activities that allow for personal achievement and accomplishment 
To provide activities that are fun and enjoyable. 

To provide physical activities which are new and different, offering a certain amount of challenge to 
participants. 

To teach skills in various activities that will have carry-over value in later life. 
To provide a healthful and diversified program of recreation activities in an 
attempt to meet the needs and interests of the people being served. 

Our total funding comes from a variety of sources. User fees and donations heavily supplement the town 
funded budget which was decimated by the effects of Prop. 2 1/2 many years ago. Volunteers always play a 
key role in providing two dollars worth of service for every dollar spent. Ue receive much help from local 
clubs and organizations. Some of these invaluable contributors are: Rotary, Kiwanis Club, Lions Club, 
Police Association, Chamber of Commerce, Knights of Columbus, Tewksbury- Wi Imi ngton Elks, Town Employees 
Association, Special Needs PAC, Camp 40 Acres, Custodial Union, Sons of Italy, and Pepsi. Along with the 
support we get from the above is the assistance given from such civic minded businesses as: AGFA, 
Compugraphic, Massbank for Savings, Charles River, F & R Auto Supply, Rocco's, Dunkin Oonuts, Town Crier, 
McDonalds, Lowell 5« Savings Bank, Polaroid, Stelios, Jay's Deli, Century 21 Starwood, Uoburn District 
Court, Leavitts Insurance, and Oonut Maker. Our summer day camp for special needs kids is SOX reimbursable 
from the Commonwealth. 

The Recreation Department is involved, in varying degrees, with many recreation oriented projects and 
groups. In this nature we serve as a quasi -consulting agency. We also loan equipment to families and 
groups of all types for various functions. 

Our basic programs are: Santa's workshop. Horribles Parade, Special Kids Christmas Party, Christmas 
shopping in New York City, spring trip to New York City, Basketball League, Men's Basketball, Men's Gym, 
Swimming Lessons, Swim-A-Cross, CPR, First Aid, Punt Pass & Kick Contest, Gymnastics, Ladies Fitness, Cinema 
Discounts, Other Commercial Recreation Enterprise Discount Coupons, Sesame Street Live at the Boston Garden, 
Special Needs Gym Program, Boat Cruise to Provi ncetown, Florida Discounts, T-Ball, Easter Egg Hunts, Circus 
trip to Boston Garden, Bruins tickets. Summer Playground, Tiny Tots, Special Needs Day Camp, Public Beach 
Supervision, Canoe Rental and Clinic, Crane's Beach Day, Teen Trips to Hampton Beach, Tennis Lessons, 
Concerts on the Common, Red Sox Trips, Sport Clinics, Fishing Derby, Self Defense, Co-ed Volley Ball, Disney 
on Ice Trip, Free Loan of Fishing, Canoeing, Soccer, Aerobics and Hawaii VCR Tapes, Police Association Beach 
Day, Easter Coloring Contest, Sale of Entertainment Discount Guides, Special Needs trips to the Shriners 
Rodeo and Circus, Sale of Greater Boston Discount Books, Ballroom Dancing Lessons, Atlantic City Trip, Town 
Christmas Party and International Karate Tournament. 

Other groups that offer leisure type programs in Wilmington are: Little League, Council on Aging, Pony 
League, Youth Hockey, Pop Warner, Figure Skating Club, Men's Softball, Square Dancing, Youth Soccer, Tennis 
Club, July 4th Committee, Community Schools, Council for the Arts, Scouts, and Campfire. Schools and 
churches round out the active recreation picture. 

There is an obvious lack of commercial recreation facilities in Wilmington such as bowling centers and movie 
theatres. The Town also lacks youth serving agencies such as YMCA's, YWCA's, Boys and Girls Clubs. The 
addition of the new rink is a great plus. This void stresses the importance for town support of various 
leisure oriented programs. 



-40- 



Veterans' Agent 



The Wilmington Veterans Agent respectfully submits his Annual Report for the year 1989. 

Paul A Farrell, Veterans Agent and the part-time services of Diane Peters, as clerk. Veterans services is 
governed by the General Laws of Massachusetts Chapter 115 as amended with strict compliance to this Chapter, 
the rules and policies of which govern the disbursement of aid. 

Benefits are for the needy veteran and his immediate family who have been subject to unforeseen needs. 
Final approval of benefits comes from the Commissioner of Veterans Services, Boston, Massachusetts. 

The balance of the first six months of 1989 from previous appropriations was $10,997.84 total available 
funds beginning July 1, 1989 was $10,000, total expended for aid to veterans and their families for the 
entire year was $1,672.75. 

The total expended by the Veterans Administration directly to an approximate veteran population of 2,033 in 
Wilmington was $1,411,058 for benefits for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1989, representing the amount of 
tax dollars not required to be expended for support of those, who because of circumstances, find it 
necessary to apply for aid. 

The appropriation for 1989 and six months of 1990 was $10,000 as voted at the Annual Town Meeting, a balance 
of $9,353.00 forwarded for the first six months of 1990. 



The annual report of the Memorial Library with its compilation of statistics for 1989 is submitted herewith: 
The decade concluded with the service goals of the library being satisfactorily met. 

A new public service was introduced with the receipt of a grant from the Massachusetts Board of Library 
Commissioners. The library purchased two Apple I ICS computer systems for public use. The grant covered the 
cost of the computers, related equipment, and seventy software programs for all levels of use and 
application. Ten residents offered their volunteer services to help in computer orientations, and 135 
patrons participated in the program. The computers, located in the Children's Room, and on the main floor, 
are being used approximately three hours per day. Volunteers continue to assist with orientations and in 
i giving assistance with specific computer programs, and are very much appreciated. 

The Circulation Department has noticed an increased awareness by the public of the public access computer 
terminals. The public more frequently makes access to the holdings of other communities participating in 
the Merrimack Valley Library Consortium. The Reference Department experienced jumps in inter-library loan 
requests. The Circulation Librarian observed a great increase in the use of museum passes, furnished by the 
local parent advisory groups. The Circulation Department also chose materials for Wilmington Woods nursing 
home on a long-term loan basis. 

The Children's Department adopted uniform hours with the Adult Department, and part-time personnel hours 
were increased to provide additional reference service, and to assist in meeting both circulation and 
programming demands. The summer reading program "Mystery Summer" was a resounding success. The children 
discovered the Apple IIGS computer, and the colored printers had heavy usage. Teenagers and mothers of 
pre-schoolers contributed valuable volunteer time to insure success with story hours and the summer program, 
and this help is very much appreciated. 

1989 was a very productive year for Technical Services, and it managed to get the bulk of new materials 
processed and in the public's hands within a week of the materials arrival. At the end of November, the 
department began work on readying an improved patron access catalog. The need for maintaining two 
cataloging systems will be coming to an end. 

During 1989 the library examined its traditional roles of providing access to books and materials, and of 
providing reference and informational services. It presented a proposed budget to start a plan to replace 
worn materials, and to update reference collections. It also presented a budget to consider developing new 
collections consisting of compact discs, talking books, and children's videos in response to public requests 
for such collections and services. 




-41- 



The accomplishments of 1989 are due to the efforts of the library staff, underpinned by town support. T 
Trustees and Director of the Memorial Library gratefully acknowledge the effort and the support. 

Library Statistics for 1989 

Number of days open during 1989 292 
Hours open each week (summer) 52 

(winter) 60 



10 



Acquisitions & Holdings: 
Newspapers 

Periodical Titles 200 
Microfi Im/fische Titles 33 
Museum Passes 5 
A/V Materials 59 

Number of volumes beginning: 77,680 

Number of volumes purchased: 2,393 

Number of volumes added as gifts: 1,123 

Number of volumes withdrawn: 2,21A 

Number of volumes at end of year: 78,982 

Circulation Activitiy 

a) Checkouts 124,736 

b) Check-ins 135,245 

c) Renewals 3,452 

d) Holds placed 2,867 

e) Recalls requested 94 

f) Reciprocal borrowing statistics 11,091 

g) Patrons registered 1,200 

h) Patrons reregistered 394 

1989 Circulation 124,736 

Circulation per capita based on 1989 Town Census of 18,131 6.88 

Retrospective Circulation: 

1984 121,934 

1985 114,554 

1986 108,353 

1987 138,336 

1988 . 113,683 

Reference and Readers Service Activity 

a) Inter-Library Loan Request sent to other libraries 940 

b) Inter-Library Loan Request received from other libraries 810 

c) Reference & Reader Service - 1989 5,248 

Retrospective Reference and Readers Service 

1984 5,908 

1985 12,926 

1986 12,589 

1987 11,763 

1988 11,514 

1989 $342,458 
1989 Per Capita Expenditure $ 18.89 

Receipts transferred to Town Treasurer $6 197 60 



-42- 



Sealer of Weights and Measures 



The following inspections were completed during the 1989 year: 

DEVICES SEALED MOT SEALED 

Gas Station Pumps HI 4 

Digital Scales 34 1 

Pharmacy Weights 47 

Oil Truck Meters 5 

(2 adjustments made) 



The inspections completed were accomplished in a short period of time. I was appointed in the middle of 
September and have not completed all necessary inspections. The next year will include thorough inspections 
of all sites in Wilmington. 



Constable 



During the year the following notices and warrants were posted: 

Event Posted Date 

Annual Town Meeting & ELection 6 Places March 21, 1989 

Special Town Meeting 6 Places April 7, 1989 

Special Town Election 6 Places May 9, 1989 

Special Town Meeting 6 Places September 27, 1989 

Special Town Election 6 Places October 24, 1989 



43- 



Conservation Commission 



1989 was a transitional year for the Conservation Commission which brought about many changes; both in 
membership and staff. The Commission welcomed four new members in 1989 whose enthusiasm, dedication and 
expertise complement the board: Gary Mercer, Dennis Poltrino, Margaret Imbimbo and Sheila Goldfield. The 
Commission also said good-bye to two members whose service and dedication were deeply appreciated: Margaret 
Carson and Jean Locicero. In August, 1989, Conservation Administrator Elizabeth Sabounjian bid the 
Commission farewell after over 2-1/2 years of dedicated service as Wilmington's first Conservation 
Administrator. She was highly commended by the Town and the Commission for her exemplary performance and 
deep commitment to the Commission, in it's mission to protect Wilmington's natural resources. Planning 
Intern Donald Nadeau assisted the Commission as Acting Conservation Administrator through October, 1989. 
His dedicated service was appreciated during a challenging transition period for the Commission. 

Eileen M. Flaherty joined the Commission's staff as Conservation Administrator in late October, 1989. She 
formerly served as Andover's Environmental Affairs Coordinator/Conservation Agent and brings over five years 
of experience in wetlands protection and conservation to the Town. 

The Conservation Commission invites the public to attend its meetings which are held on the first and third 
Wednesdays of each month at 7:30 p.m. in Room 6 at the Town Hall. 

While continuing to pursue the goal of education outreach, the Conservation Administrator made several 
presentations to classes in the Wilmington elementary schools during the winter and spring of 1989. In late 
November, 1989, the Conservation Administrator gave a slide show and presentation to the Wilmington Garden 
Club. Entitled "Wetlands Protection and Conservation - an Overview", this presentation was videotaped and 
aired on local cable television. 

The Commission members continued to actively pursue a schedule of self-taught seminars on wetlands 
protection. The Board is also close to completing the update of the Commission Operating By-Law. The Land 
Acquisition Subcommittee was very active in 1989; targeting parcels of land for acquisition which are 
significant to wetlands protection and open space values. Another subcommittee, the Boiler-Plate 
subcommittee will be working in earnest to update and revise the existing Boiler-Plate which contains the 
standard conditions and language utilized in the issuance of Order of Conditions permits. 

During 1989, the Conservation Administrator prepared an updated map of Wilmington's Conservation land. This 
map identifies all parcels under the Conservation Commission's control as of 1989 and is available to any 
interested citizens. 

The Conservation staff and board members actively served and assisted on many Town Projects in 1989 
including but not limited to the Recycling Committee, Local Emergency Planning Committee, Affordable Housing 
Task Force, Town-Owned Land Study, Aquifer Protection Study and the Strategic Management Plan. 

Conservation Intern/Ranger Donald Penney completed many projects on several parcels of Conservation land in 
Wilmington. Signs, trails and footbridges constructed by Mr. Penney now welcome visitors to many of our 
conservation properties. 

The Commission office is open to the public in the Town Hall, Room 6, weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
The office is staffed by full-time Conservation Administrator, Eileen M. Flaherty; part-time secretary, 
Ginny Lemos and part-time Conservation Intern/Ranger, Donald Penney. 

The Conservation Commission and its staff gratefully acknowledge the support and cooperative efforts shown 
by the Selectmen, the Town Manager and all of the Town Departments and Boards this year. 

The Commission would also like to extend deep appreciation and special thanks to Mr. Jay Palmer for the 
donation of 13 acres of land to the Town for conservation purposes. 

The preservation of natural resources in Wilmington remains a major priority of the conservation 
Commission. All who are interested in contributing to land preservation in Wilmington via land donations 
are urged to contact the Commission office anytime. 

Wetlands protection and open space preservation goals can be fully achieved only with the assistance and 
cooperation of Wilmington's citizens. 

Thank you for your support! 



-44- 



STATISTICAL DATA 



Filing Fees Collected $2,072.50 

Notices of Intent Filed 28 

Determination of Applicability Requested 33 

Public Hearings Held (including continuances) 82 

Notices of Non-Significance Issued 

Extension Permits Issued 4 

Enforcement Orders Issued 4 

Violation Notices Issued 45 

Complaints Investigated 25 

Certificates of Compliance Issued 17 

Decisions Appealed (2-1 withdrawn) 1 

Cases Pending or Withdrawn 5 

Denials Issued 

Order of Conditions Issued 35 

Site Inspections Conducted (By members & staff) 494 



DEQE FILE # 
344-310 
-312 
-313 



-314 
-315 
316 
-317 
-318 
-319 



APPLICANT NAME/PROJECT NAME/TYPE 
Hartwright, Inc. /Commercial 
Mark Nelson/Residential 
Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company/Commerc i 
Utility 

Northeastern Dev. Corp. ./Residential 
Lawrence Walsh/Residential 
Peter J. Michaels IV/ Residential 
Richard G. Cole/Residential 
William K. Irwin, Jr. /Residential 
Ohio Realty Trust/Residential 



STREET LOCATION MAP/PARCEL # DECISION 

Concord Street 77/11-14 Order Issued 

Wirth Avenue 7/6 Order Issued 

Tennessee Gas Pipeline Easement 2.1 miles, from 
Burlington Town Line Northeastward to just west 



of Woburn Street 
Cary Street 
Salem Street 
Chestnut Street 
Marion Street 
Chestnut Street 
New Hampshire, 

Vermont & Indian 

Roads 



-320 


Station Dev. Corp. /Residential 


Auburn Avenue 


-321 


Northeastern Dev. Corp. /Residential 


Baker Street 


-322 


Christine L. Emery/Residential 


Marion Street 


-323 


Tennessee Gas Pipeline Co./Commerci al/ 


Butters Row 




Uti lity 




-324 


P.G.A. Realty Trust/Commercial 


Upton Drive 


-325 


Northeastern Dev. Corp. /Residential 


Edgeworth Avenue & 






Burning Road 


-326 


Richard W. Porter/Residential 


Winston Avenue 


-327 


Joseph Parel la/Residential 


Mackey Road 


-328 


Ralph E. Newhouse/Residential 


Norfolk Avenue 


-329 


Cathy & Charles Tynan/Residential 


Forest Street 


-330 


James Palmer/Residential 


Palmer Way 


-331 


Ohio Realty Trust/Residential 


Bradford, Rhode 






Island & Frisco 






Roads 


-332 


Colonial Data Partners/Commercial 


Lowell Street 


-333 


Linn Anderson/Residential 


Lynch Lane 


-334 


Charles & Cathy Tynan/Residential 


Forest Street 


-335 


AMTRAK/Commercial 


MBTA Commuter Rai I 






Hampshire; Main 1 


-336 


William P. Blagbrough/Commercial 


Main Street 


-337 


Salvatore Grasso/Residential 


New Hampshire Road 


-338 


Alfred V. Fraumeni/Residential 


Lake Street 



67/111,112,113 

83/1 

15/3A 

5/1 

15/10C 

35/36,113,130, 



Order Issued 
Order Issued 
Order Issued 
Order Issued 
Order Issued 
Order Issued 
Order Issued 



131, 131 A, 137, 137A, 138, 139, 47, 
47A, 48, 49, 50, 51, 51 A, 52, 53, 54, 
55, 55A,55B,55C, 59,60, 60A,60B, 
61,61A 

32/96-98 Order Issued 

44/86A Order Issued 

15/13A Order Issued 

28/4 Order Issued 

R-1/18 Order Issued 

11/11C,11B,11G Order Issued 
11F,12A,12B,12G, 
12F 

8/61, 61A Order Issued 

62/47 Order Issued 

32/11,12 Order Issued 

7/3 Withdrawn 

79/111B Order Issued 

35/56, 56A,56B, Order Issued 
56C,56D,56E,58,62,62A,63,64, 
65 , 66 , 68 , 68A , 69 , 69B , 69C , 70 , 71 

40/16 Order Issued 

67/40 Order Issued 

7/3 Order Issued 

Line; New Order Issued 



39/8 & 8A 

35/47A 

35/23 



Pendi ng 
Order Issued 
Order Issued 



-45- 



Determinations of Applicability Requested 

APPLICANT NAME/PROJECT NAME/TYPE 

A. J. Costa/Residential 
Virginia & Riley Hooder/Residential 
Peter DeGennaro/Residential 
Laurence H. Green 

Chestnut Street 
Ralph Grassia/Residential 
James Newhouse/Residential 
James Banda/Residential 
Frank Khan/Residential 

Town of Wilmington/General Industry General 
Business Route 38) from Butters Row 

Stephen F. Lawrenson/Uaterf ord Estates/ 
Residential 

Joseph Langone/Ohio Realty Trust/ 
Residential 

Gary Mercer & Elizabeth Harriman/Residential 

Michael McCoy/Commerical 

Eloise & Kenneth Sevener/Residential 

North Street 
Jeff Scott Realty Trust/Residential 
Edward Hi I l/Residential 
Key Jay Realty Trust/c/o Northeastern 

Development Corp. /Residential 
Joseph Casey/Residential 
Peter C. DeGennaro/Residential 
Peter C. DeGennaro/Residential 
Earl Hupper/Residential 
Peter C. DeGennaro/Residential 
Peter C. DeGennaro/Residential 
Paul Butt/Residential 
Donald W. Cameron/Residential 
John Gennetti/Residential 
Salvatore & Marie Grasso/Residential 
Nancy & James Marques/Residential 
Thomas E. Casey/Residential 
Paul R. Lei i to/Residential 

Glen Road 
Loretta H. Cole/Residential 
David Sheehan/Residential 
Joseph Langone/Residential 
Office of Public Archaeology Boston 
Uni versi ty 



STREET LOCATION 

8 Ferguson Road 
Crystal Road 
Ohio Street 
Butters Row and 

Chestnut Road 
Middlesex Avenue 
Emerson Avenue 

Main Street (State 

Uoburn Street & 
Crystal Road 
Vermont Road, New 



MAP/PARCEL # 

33/4D 
58/17A 
35/213 
15/3, 3A 

15/3A 

89/16A 

55/518 

41/138 

58/17A 

36/5lA,52,137A,47 



Hampshire Road and Garvin Street 



lirchwood Road 

Lowell Street 
Middlesex Avenue & 

Coral & Broad St. 
Cary Street 
Cary Street 

Federal Street 
New Hampshire Road 
Gorham Street 
Uoburn Street 
Lynch Lane 
Vermont Road 
Earle's Row 
Eames Street 
Roosevelt Road 
New Hampshire Road 
New Hampshire Road 
Chestnut Street 
Rhodes Street and 

Bancroft Street 

Swain Road 

New Hampshire Road 

Butters Row 



81/18 

49/570 

88/12-A 

67/89A 
67/76A & 
67/88-K 



75B 



64/3A 

35/47A,48,49,50,51,51A,52 

67/37 

58/19 

67/38 & 39 

35/59, 60A,60B, 61, 61A 

96/205 

37/10 

7/91C 

35/47A 

35/47A 

15/4 

53/25 

77/41A 

7/86 

35/55B 



-46- 



Council on Aging 



In 1989, the Council on Aging under the leadership of Chairman Grace Kirkland accomplished a great deal. 
I The parking lot was made twice its original size. A picnic area was cleared. An enclosure was added to the 
I building's entrance door, to keep the wind and cold out of the building. A metal gate was installed to 
j close off the back entry where leaves were building up and could cause a fire by a discarded match. 

Received a car to transport our frail and disabled seniors to medical and other elderly related 
I appointments. A cable television hook-up was installed in the center donated by Continental Cablevision. 

] This year many of our seniors suffered heart attacks. For many by-pass surgery was required, for others a 
I diet was recommended. We have several excellent exercise programs at the center to keep the seniors 
healthy, but we felt a little more had to be done. Walking and bike riding are excellent to keep the heart 
healthy. But this is difficult during the winter months. To solve this we set up an exercise room 
I containing a treadmill, exercise bike and a rowing machine. 

Through the brochures of all the programs and services under the Council on Aging we are reaching many more 
of our younger senior residents in their sixties. They are becoming very active in our programs and 
classes. Our dance class has a group of students who are now performing throughout the year for hospitals, 
nursing homes and other senior citizen centers upon request. The older seniors are pleased to see the 
younger seniors joining in these performances. 

Every year the seniors work very hard putting together the Senior Fair. Many volunteer hours, much time, 
talent and money is donated willingly by the seniors to make it a success. They feel the money they earn 
will buy articles for the center, our way of helping the town meet the needs of its older residents. In 
1989, through the fair money, the committee bought a tape recorder for the Council meetings, a music center 
for the dance class, a calculator, 2 file cabinets and a typewriter for the office, new refrigerator for the 
kitchen, treadmill, exercise bike, rowing machine, glass doors and trim on the doors for the exercise room, 
tools for the woodworking class, three therapeutic socials, open house party at Christmas and New Year's and 
the July all day picnic. 

Services rendered through the Coucil on Aging to the elders in 1989 were: 



Transportation to medical and other elderly related travel appointments 7,426 
Mi les traveled 

Meals on Wheels to shut ins 16,607 

Miles traveled 14,023 

Meals served at the congregated lunch site 6,341 

Volunteer hours by seniors 7,623 
Special holiday dinners to our homebound donated by the Analog Device Corp. 

and the Kiwanis Club 405 

Outreach through our therapeutic socials 2,438 

Telephone calls received into the center for help and information 8,143 

Applications for fuel, oil burners and weatherization 165 

New seniors were given photo I.D. cards 408 

Seniors entering the center 22,769 
Weekly newspaper columns written and published in the Town Crier, Advertiser and the 

Suburban News 52 

To the following we extend our thanks for funds, enabling us to deliver the above services: 

The taxpayers for approving our budget. 

Federal and state for paying for fuel, oil burners and weatherization $164,721 

Minuteman Home Care for homemakers, hospice services and chore workers 165,837 

Department of Elder Affairs Grant used for our Outreach Organizer 3,708 

Northeast Visiting Nurse Assoc. 11,750 

Mystic Valley Mental Health (counseling for depression) 11,200 

H.B. Fuller Company for painting the house of a disabled senior living alone estimated cost 1,000 

Tewksbury/Wi Imington Elks November therapeutic social estimated value 3,000 
Rotary Club monthly food gift certificate 
Kiwanis Club monthly donation to the Whist 

Lion's Club June therapeutic social estimated value 3,000 
Lion's Club monthly food gift certificate 

We also thank Town Manager, Buzz Stapczynski for his guidance and support. Representative James Miceli for 
being there to help us get through the redtape of state agencies in helping our seniors, and his support on 



our grant application. Diamond Crystal Salt Co. for napkins and sugar used at the center, the Yum Yum Shop 
for their daily supply of pastry for the center, Plate Escape for their help with the large number of cups 
used yearly. Flower Stop for flowers to the shut-ins. Meadow Gardens for our Christmas tree. Continental 
Cablevision for the cable hook up at the center, all the merchants who contributed gifts for our fair 
raffle, Hampshire Press for donating the printing of our chance books. And all in any way who contributed 
in making the lives of the senior residents of Wilmington more meaningful in the year 1989, we are grateful, 



-47- 



Board of Appeals 



APPLICANT 
Case 1-89 

Presidential Development 
Corporation 



REASON FOR APPEAL 

To acquire a variance from standard dimensional regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the construction of a single family 
dwelling within the side yard setback for property 
located on lot 13 Ohio Street. (Assessor's Map 35, Parcel 213) 



Case 2-89 
Chestnut Builders 



To obtain a special permit in accordance with Section 5.3.4 
of the Zoning By-Law to authorize a hammerhead lot for 
property located on Uedgewood Avenue. (Assessor's Map 21 
and 33, Parcel 44)(Lot 3) 



Case 3-89 
Chestnut Builders 



To obtain a special permit in accordance with Section 5.3.4 
of the Zoning By-Law to authorize a hammerhead lot for 
property located on Wedgewood Avenue. (Assessor's Map 21 
and 33, Parcel 44)(Lot 4) 



Chestnut Builders 



To obtain a special permit in accordance with Section 5.3.4 
of the Zoning By-Law to authorize a hammerhead lot for 
property located on Wedgewood Avenue. (Assessor's Map 21 
and 33. Parcel 44)(Lot 1) 



John Cushing 



To obtain a special permit in accordance with Section 5.3.4 
of the Zoning By-Law to authorize a hammerhead lot for 
property located on 12 Presidential Drive. (Assessor's Map 
18, Parcel 8L)(Lot 1) 



John Cushing 



To obtain a special permit in accordance with Section 5.3.4 
of the Zoning By-Law to authorize a hammerhead lot for 
property located on 12 Presidential Drive. (Assessor's Map 
18, Parcel 8L)(Lot 2) 



Case 7-89 

Koch Membrane Syst« 



To acquire a special permit to use office trailers for a 
minimum of six months while renovations are being done to 
their second floor, property located at 850 Main Street. 
(Assessor's Map 38, Parcel 1) 



Case 8-89 

01 i ver Realty Trust 



To acquire a variance authorizing the construction of an 
addition with less than required lot area, frontage, side 
and rear yard setback for property located at 375 Main 
Street. (Map 42, Parcel 22G) 



Case 9-89 
Peter J. Caruso 



Case 10-89 
Granted 

Bruce and Janet Dewire 



Case 11-89 

Cami lie Bar letta 



To acquire a variance for two lots of land located in a 
public way, Andover Street, to be approved as buildable 
lots. Lot 1 contains 60,000 square feet. Lot 2 contains 
60,618 square feet. Both lots comply with all dimensional 
regulations except 5.2.3 lot width permitting a circle with 
a diameter of 200 feet to be placed within said lots. The 
circumference of such circle would intersect some of the 
lot lines. The area of the Town in which these lots are 
located will not be harmed by this variance. The shape of 
both lots has determined this variance request. Literal 
enforcement would be a hardship upon the owner. Property 
located on Andover Street. (Assessor's Map R3, Parcel 20) 

To acquire a variance authorizing the construction of 

an addition within the front yard setback as per Section 
5.2.4 of Wilmington Zoning By-Law for property located on 
12 Dadant Drive. (Assessor's Map 78, Parcel 12) 

To obtain a special permit authorizing a dwelling conversior 
for property located at One Ferguson Road. (Assessor's Map 
32, Parcel 110) 



DECISION 
Granted 

Granted 

Granted 

Granted 
Granted 
Granted 
Granted 
Granted 
Granted 



-48- 



APPLICANT 



Case 12-89 
i Wi 1 1 iam Stark 



REASON FOR APPEAL 

To obtain a special permit in accordance with Section 5.3.4 
of the Zoning By-Law to authorize a hammerhead lot for 
property located on 54 Andover Street. (Assessor's Map 
103. Parcel 1A) 



DECISION 
Granted 



l ease 13-89 
Matt and El lie Kane 



Case 14-89 

Highway Leasing Co. 



To acquire a variance from standard dimensional regulations 
authorizing the construction of a pool within the side and 
rear yard setback for property located on 5 Marcus Road. 
(Assessor's Map 92, Parcel 110) 

To request a determination that a vehicle leasing use its 
allowed pursuant to the use provisions of the Zoning 
By-Laws for the Town of Wilmington for property located at 
615 Main Street. (Assessor's Map 40, Parcel 2B) 



Case 15-89 
Priscilla R. Ward 



To obtain a special permit in accordance with Section 5.3.4 
of the Zoning By-Law to authorize a hammerhead lot for 
property located on Fitz Terrace. (Assessor's Map 34, 
Parcel 147 and Part of 156} 



Case 16-89 
Raymond Lepore 



Case 17-89 

Joyce K. Brisbois 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with Section 3.6.3 
authorizing a repair garage and variance to remove the 
existing house and construct a new building on a lot with 
less than required area for property located at 148 
Ballardvale Street. (Assessor's Map R2, Parcel 9) 

To obtain a special permit in accordance with Section 5.3.4 
of the Zoning By-Law to authorize a hammerhead lot for 
property located on Boutweel Street. (Assessor's Map 18, 
Parcel 3A)(Lot Al) 



Case 18-89 

Joyce K. Brisbois 



Case 19-89 

Joyce K. Brisbois 



To obtain a special permit in accordance with Section 5.3.4 
of the Zoning By-Law to authorize a hammerhead lot for 
property located on Boutwell Street. (Assessor's Map 18, 
Parcel 3A)(Lot A2) 

To obtain a special permit in accordance with Section 5.3.4 
of the Zoning By-Law to authorize a hammerhead lot for 
property located on John Street. (Assessor's Map 18, 
Parcel 3A)(Lot A3) 



Case 20-89 

James and Eleanor Demos 



Case 21-89 
Michael Sullivan 



Case 22-89 
Michael Sullivan 



Case 23-89 

Daniel and Anne Oevine 



Case 24-89 
idward Welch 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the sub-division of a parcel of land 
and to construct a dwelling with less than required 
frontage for a parcel located on 40 Hopkins Street. 
(Assessor's Map 11, Parcel 58C) 

To acquire a variance to sub-divide a parcel and to allow an 
existing single family dwelling to remain as situated on 
property located on 3 Adelman Road. (Assessor's Map 83, 
Parcel 33)(Lot A) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the construction of a single family 
dwelling on a lot with insufficient depth, width, frontage 
and area, for property located on Pineview Road. 
(Assessor's Map 83, Parcel 33)(Lot B) 

To acquire a variance authorizing the construction of a 
single family dwelling on a lot with insufficient frontage, 
width, and area for property located on Littlewood Street 
and Avon Street. (Assessor's Map 9, Parcel 34) 

To acquire a variance authorizing the construction of a single 
family dwelling within the side yard setback for property 
located at Pearl Court. (Assessor's Map 34, Parcel 59) 



Wi thdrawn 



-49- 



APPLICANT 



REASON FOR APPEAL 



DECISIO 



Case 25-89 
Hector Gaudet 



Case 26-89 
Robert Beaulieu 



To acquire a variance allowing an addition to be built in 
accordance with Section 6.1.2.2 for property located at 8 
Cypress Street. (Assessor's Map 53, Parcel UA) 

To acquire a variance authorizing the existing structure to 
remain situated on the lot and to allow an addition to be 
built within the front and side yard setback and to be no 
closer than the existing structure, for property located at 
20 Beacon Street. (Assessors Map 41, Parcel 11) 



Case 27-89 
Ralph Surianello 



To acquire a variance authorizing the existing dwelling to 
remain on a lot with less than required frontage, width, 
and front yard setback, for property located at Lot 11 
Amherst Road. (Assessor's Map 32, Parcel 87A) 



Case 28-89 
Ralph Surianello 



To acquire a variance authorizing the existing dwelling to 
remain on a lot with less than required side yard setbacks 
for property located at Amherst Road. (Assessor's Map 32, 
Parcel 87B) 



Case 29-89 
George Ravasini 



To acquire a variance to subdivide a parcel of land and 

to construct a dwelling with insufficient area frontage and 

width for property located at Kendall Street. (Assessor's 
Map 20, Parcel 7) 



Case 30-89 
Charles Tynan 



To acquire a variance authorizing the subdivision of a 
parcel and the construction of a dwelling with less than 
required frontage and width for property located at 64 
Forest Street. (Assessor's Map 7, Parcel 3) 



Case 31-89 

Robert G. Peterson 



To acquire a variance authorizing the existing dwelling to 
remain as situated on a lot having insufficient front yard 
setback for property located on 268 Burlington Avenue. 
(Assessor's Map 6, Parcel 55) 



Case 32-89 

Robert G. Peterson 



To acquire a variance authorizing the construction of a singl( 
family dwelling on a lot having insufficient area, for 
property located on Wall Street. (Assessor's Map 6, Parcel 
55) 



Case 33-89 
Fourth of July 
Commi ttee 



To acquire a special permit authorizing a carnival to be held 
in the parking lot of the Wilmington High School, Church St. 
(Assessor's Map 63, Parcel 10) 



Case 34-89 
Joseph Massee 



To obtain a special permit authorizing a hammerhead lot 
for property located on 19 Carter Lane. (Assessor's Map 
32, Parcel 77) 



Case 35-89 

Robert G. Peterson 



To obtain a special permit authorizing 
for property located on 125 Glen Road. 
Parcel 8C) 



I hammerhead lot 
(Assessor's Map 54, 



Case 36-89 
Joseph DeLuca 



To acquire a variance authorizing the construction of a garage 
and family room within the side and rear lot line for 
property located on 29 Fay Street. (Assessor's Map 67, 
Parcel 71B) 



Case 37-89 
Kenneth Waite 



To acquire a variance authorizing the construction of a 
an addition within the side yard setback for property 
located on 17 Grand Street. (Assessor's Map 31, Part of 
Parcel 17B) 



Case 38-89 
Daniel Brown, 



Esq. 



To acquire a variance authorizing the construction of a 
single family dwelling within reserved front yard, side 
yard and rear yard setbacks for property located on 
Dartmouth Avenue. (Assessor's Map 40, Parcels 169) 



-50- 



APPLICANT 



REASON FOR APPEAL 



DECISION 



Case 39-89 
Daniel Brown, 



Esq. 



To acquire a variance confirming status of the proposed 
house lot as a pre-existing lot as defined under the 
provisions of Section 5.3.2 of the Zoning By-Laws and as 
was previously so determined by the Board of Appeals Case 
135-87. The one year expiration of the Board's prior 
decision necessitates a new decision. (Assessor's Map 40, 
Parcel part of 169) 



Case 40-89 
Charles Val las 



To acquire a special permit authorizing a dwelling 
conversion for property located at 184 Main Street. 
(Assessor's Map 44, Parcel 176) 



Case 41-89 
William Cole 



To allow the sub-division of a parcel and allow the 
construction of dwelling on a lot with less than required 
frontage and width for property located at Bancroft Street 
and Long Street. (Assessor's Map 77, Parcel 41A) 



Case 42-89 
Granted 

Reading Realty Trust 



To acquire a variance authorizing the construction of a 

single family dwelling with less than required frontage and 
width for property located at Grand Street. (Assessor's 
Map 31, Parcel part of 57) 



Case 43-89 
Coombs Furniture 



Case 44-89 
Granted 

Daniel Brown, Esq. 



To acquire a special permit to allow an addition of a barn 
for warehouse space for property located at 464 Middlesex 
Avenue. (Assessor's Map 89, Parcel 17) 

To obtain a special permit authorizing a hammerhead lot 

for property located on Marion Street. (Assessor's Map 15, 
Parcel part of 13) 



Case 45-89 
Edward Graziano 



To acquire a variance authorizing the construction of an 

addition within the rear lot line and to allow the existing 

shed to remain as situated on the lot for property located 

at 27 Auburn Avenue. (Assessor's Map 32, Parcel 104A) 



Case 46-89 
Josephine Olshaw 



To acquire a variance authorizing the construction of a si 
family dwelling on a lot with insufficient frontage for 
property located on 116 Nichols Street. (Assessor's Map 
36, Parcel 69) 



ngle 



Case 47-89 

Jo Ral Realty Trust 



To acquire a special permit for the construction of a garage 
which by dimension exceeds that authorized in a residential 
zone for land located on 16 Presidential Drive. 
(Assessor's Map 18, Parcel Part of 8K) 



Case 48-89 
Kenneth Ings 



To acquire a special permit authorizing an alteration and 
extension of a non-conforming single family dwelling for 
property located at 38 Columbia Street. (Assessor's Map 
41, Parcel 73) 



Case 49-89 
Alfred Fraumeni 



To obtain a special permit authorizing a hammerhead lot for 
property located on 157 Lake Street (Lot 1). (Assessor's Map 
35, Parcel 23) 



Case 50-89 

Albert G. Fiorenza 



To obtain a special permit authorizing a hammerhead lot for 
property located on 157 Lake Street (Lot 3). (Assessor's 
Map 35, Parcel 23) 



Case 51-89 
Alfred Fraumeni 



To obtain a special permit authorizing a hammerhead lot for 
property located on 157 Lake Street (Lot 4). (Assessor's 
Map 35, Parcel 23) 



-51- 




Case 52-89 
Alfred Fraumeni 



Case 53-89 
Alfred Fraumeni 



Case 54-89 

P.G.A. Realty Trust 



Case 55-89 
Kenneth and Esther 
Morse 



Case 56-89 
Larry Feeney 



Case 57-89 
Larry Feeney 



Case 58-89 

Wi 1 1 i am Cavanaugh 



Case 59-89 
Walter Raposo 



Case 60-89 
Edward Hill 



Case 61-89 
Edward Hill 



Case 62-89 
Edward Hill 



Case 63-89 
Stanley Ashdown 



REASON FOR APPEAL 

To obtain a special permit in accordance with Section 
5.3.3 authorizing a frontage exception lot for property 
located at 157 Lake Street (Lot 5). (Assessor's Map 35, 
Parcel 23) 

To obtain a special permit in accordance with Section 5.3.3 
authorizing a frontage exception lot for property located 
at 157 Lake Street (Lot 6). (Assessor's Hap 35, Parcel 23) 

To acquire a variance to place a sign within the 10' - 0" 
setback from the right of way line of Upton Drive, for 
property located at 30 Upton Drive. (Assessor's Map RI, 
Parcel 18) 

To acquire a variance authorizing the construction of an 
addition within the side yard setback for property located 
at 150 Faulkner Avenue. (Assessor's Map 70, Parcel 11) 

To acquire a variance to sub-divide a parcel of land into 
two lots, and to allow the existing structure to remain on 
lot 62A for property located at 31 Nassau Avenue. 
(Assessor's Map 31, Parcel 62) 

To construct a dwelling on a lot with insufficient depth 
and area for property located on Dunmore Road, (Lot 62B). 
(Assessor's Map 31, Parcel 62B) 

To acquire a variance authorizing the construction of a pool 
within the side and rear yard setback for property located 
at 11 Carmel Street. (Assessor's Map 54, Parcel 101) 

To acquire a variance authorizing the existing structure 
to remain and to allow the construction of an addition 
within the side yard setback for property located at 2 
Cypress Street. (Assessor's Map 53, Parcel 12) 

To acquire a variance authorizing the construction of a 
dwelling on a lot with insufficient width and area for 
property located on March Road (formerly Pine Street). 
(Assessor's Map 49, Parcel 37A) 

To acquire a variance authorizing the construction of a 
dwelling on a lot with insufficient width for property 
located on March Road (formerly Pine Street). (Assessor's 
Map 49, Parcel 39A) 

To acquire a variance authorizing the construction of a 
dwelling on a lot with insufficient width for property 
located on March Road (formerly Pine Street). (Assessor's 
Map 49, Parcel 37B) 

To obtain a special permit authorizing a hammerhead lot for 
property located on Butters Row. (Assessor's Map 28, 
Parcel 5) 



DECISIOK ' 
Granted I 



Case 64-89 
Earl Hupper 



Case 65-89 
Daniel DeCourcey 



To acquire a variance authorizing the existing dwelling to 
remain within the side yard setback for property located at 
58 Rear Clark Street. (Assessor's Map 52, Parcel 43) 

To acquire a variance authorizing the construction of an 
aboveground pool within the side and rear yard setback for 
property located at 14 Carolyn Road. (Assessor's Map 88, 
Parcel 73D) 



-52- 



APPLICANT 



Case 66-89 

J. A. Miara Trans., Inc, 



Case 67-89 
Eugene Knitter 



Case 68-89 
Richard Spurr 



Case 69-89 
Paul Sullivan 



Case 70-89 
Arthur Smith 



Case 71-89 
James Castellano 



Case 72-89 
Frederick Ferrara 



Case 73-89 
John Gushing 



Case 74-89 
Robert Bell 



Case 75-89 
Kevin Patterson 



Case 76-89 

Town of Wi Imlngton 

Water Department 



Case 77-89 

Key Jay Realty Trust 

Case 78-89 
Granted 

Key Jay Realty Trust 



REASON FOR APPEAL 

To acquire a variance authorizing the construction of a 
sign that exceeds sizes in Town By-Laws for property 
located on West Street. (Assessor's Map 71, Parcel 11) 

To acquire a variance authorizing the construction of a 
garage within the front yard setback for property located 
on Pilling Road. (Assessor's Map 94, Parcel 55) 

To acquire a variance authorizing the construction of an 
addition within the side yard setback for property located 
on Grace Drive. (Assessor's Map 36, Parcel 149) 

To acquire a variance authorizing the construction of a 
garage within the front and side yard setbacks for property 
located on Allen Park Drive. (Assessor's Map 49, Parcel 135) 

To acquire a variance authorizing the construction of a 
single family dwelling on a lot with insufficient side yard 
setback for property located on Kajin Way. (Assessor's Map 
87, Parcel 106) 

To obtain a special permit in accordance with Section 5.3.4 
of the Zoning By-Law to authorize a hammerhead lot for 
property located on 39 Hopkins Street. (Assessor's Map 10, 
Parcel 2) 

To acquire a special permit in accordance with Section 
6.1.2.2 authorizing an alteration and extension of a 
non-conforming single family dwelling. Addition will 
extend no further into the front yard setback than the 
existing dwelling for property located a 5 Hobson Avenue. 
(Assessor's Map 44, Parcel 15) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the existing dwelling to remain as 
situated on a lot having insufficient frontage and lot 
width for property located at 12 Presidential Drive. 
(Assessor's Map 18, Parcel 8L) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the construction of a shed within 
the side yard setback for property located at 3 Lang 
Street. (Assessor's Map 77, Parcel 39) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the construction of an inground 
swimming pool within the side and rear yard setbacks for 
property located at 31 Oakridge Circle. (Assessor's Map 
92, Parcel 36) 

To acquire a special permit in accordance with Section 
5.2.8.1 of the Zoning By-Laws, to allow the construction of 
a water tank exceeding the height allowed by the Zoning 
By-Laws, for property located at the Town Forest. 
(Assessor's Map R3, Parcel 300) 

To obtain a special permit in accordance with Section 5.3.4 
of the Zoning By-Law to authorize a hammerhead lot for 
property located on Lot 4 Cary Street. (Assessor's Map 67, 
Parcels 88K & 112) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 

(Table II) authorizing the construction of a dwelling 
within the front yard setback for property located on Cary 
Street (Lot 1). (Assessor's Map 67, Parcel 113) 



DECISION 
Granted 



-53- 



APPLICANT 

Case 79-89 
Charles Rooney 



REASON FOR APPEAL 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the existing garage to remain within 
the side yard setback for property located at 92 Chestnut 
Street. (Assessor's Map 15, Parcel 24). 



Case 80-89 
Francis Sartori 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the existing shed to remain as 
situated on property located on 459 Shawsheen Avenue 
(Assessor's Map 35, Parcel 34A) 



Case 81-89 
Benjamin DeGennaro 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the construction of a deck within the 
rear lot line for property located on 8 Presidential Drive. 
(Assessor's Map 18, Parcel 8C) 



Case 82-89 

Reading Realty Trust 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the construction of a single family 
dwelling within the front yard setback for property located 
on Lot 2 Edgeworth Street. (Assessor's Map 11, Parcel 12C) 



Case 83-89 
Richard Galante 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with Section 
3.5.15 authorizing the existing Auto Repair and Body Shop 
to remain for property located at 685 Main Street. 
(Assessor's Map 39, Parcel 11) 



Case 84-89 
Albert Cutone 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the unauthorized garage to remain as 
situated within the side yard setback for property located 
at 13 Draper Drive. (Assessor's Map 101, Parcel 213) 



Case 85-89 
Gary A. Bigelow 



To acquire a variance to construct a loading ramp and a 

driveway to be less than 200' away from another driveway 

for property located at 68 Jonspin Road. (Assessor's Map 
R1, Parcel 303) 



Case 86-q9 

Glen R. Wi 1 1 iamson 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the existing dwelling to remain as 
situated on the lot and to allow the construction of a shed 
to be within the side yard setback for property located at 
21 Hillside Way. (Assessor's Map 2, Parcel 14) 



Case 87-89 
Robert S. Boyce 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the construction of a garage within 
the front yard setback for property located on 23 Allen 
Park Drive. (Assessor's Map 49, Parcel 138) 



Case 88-89 
Paul Lee 



Case 89-89 
Joseph Bradley 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table 1 1 ) to construct a shed within the rear yard setback 
on a non-conforming lot for property located at 16 Marjorie 
Road. (Assessor's Map 55, Parcel 196) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing an existing secondary house on lot 
to remain, and to allow another house on lot to be 
demolished or remodeled or a new dwelling constructed, for 
property located on 23 North Street. (Assessor's Map 88, 
Parcel 41) 



Case 90-89 
Fred F. Cain. 



To acquire a variance in accordance with Section 4.1 
(Accessory Use) and Section 5.2.6 (Open Space) of the 
Zoning By-Laws, for property located on Main Street. 
(Assessor's Map 41, Parcel 138) 



-54- 



APPLICANT 



REASON FOR APPEAL 



DECISION 



Case 91-89 

Fred F. Cain, Inc. 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with Section 
6.4.1.1, Section 6.4.2.4 of the Zoning By-Laws for 
property located on Main Street. (Assessor's Map 41, 
Parcel 138) 



Case 92-89 
Ralph Surianello 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with Section 
4.1.7.2 to allow a trailer to be used on property located 
on Amherst Road. (Assessor's Map 49, Parcel 138) 



Case 93-89 
George Veloza 



To acquire a variance to construct an addition within the 
side yard setback for property located at 68 Lawrence 
Street. (Assessor's Map 80, Parcel 38) 



Case 94-89 
T. E. Casey 
Marine Corp League 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with Section 6.4.3 
of the Zoning By-Law to authorize less than required 
off-street parking for property located on Chestnut 
Street. (Assessor's Map 15, Parcel 4) 



Case 95-89 
Daniel and Sonja 
Hal I iday 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the construction of a single 
family dwelling on a lot with insufficient width for 
property located on Factory Street. (Assessor's Map 27, 
Parcel 4) 



Case 96-89 
Rosemary Quinn- 
DeAngelo 



To appeal the decision of the Building Inspector and for 
clarification of case #46-62 as a recreational use for 
property located on 300 Chestnut Street. (Assessor's Map 
2, Parcel 23) 



Pending 



Case 97-89 
Christos Melitse 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the construction of a pool within 
the side and rear yard setbacks for property located at 5 
Doane Street. (Assessor's Map 67, Parcel 100A) 



Case 98-89 
Gary Culkins 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the existing garage to remain and to 
construct a room above the garage for property located on 4 
Andrew Street. (Assessor's Map 9, Parcel 85) 



Case 99-89 
Daniel P. Murphy 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the construction of an addition on a 
lot with less than required frontage for property located 
on Swain Court. (Assessor's Map 7, Parcel 21) 



Case 100-89 

B.C.T. Realty Trust 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing for the construction of a single 
family dwelling on a lot having insufficient width, depth 
and area for property located on Daniels Drive. 
(Assessor's Map 9, Parcel 56) 



Case 101-89 
Albert Fiorenza 



To acquire a variance to subdivide a parcel of land and 
construct a dwelling on a lot with less than required 
frontage and width for property located on 93 West Street. 
(Assessor's Map 71, Parcel 23) 



Case 102-89 
Joseph Martell 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the construction of a shed within 
the side and rear lot lines for property located on 20 Ohio 
Street. (Assessor's Map 35, Parcel 209) 



Case 103-89 
Joseph Cataldo 



To acquire a variance to subdivide a parcel of land and to 
construct a single family dwelling for property located at 
Hardin Road. (Assessor's Map 20, Parcel 18) 



-55- 



Case 104-89 
Donna Secher 



Case 105-89 

Phi I ip Salvaggio 



Case 106-89 
John Carpenito 



REASON FOR APPEAL 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the existing dwelling to remain as 
situated on a lot for property located on 82 Salem Street. 
(Assessor's Map 83, Parcel 4) 

To acquire a special permit in accordance with Section 
6.1.2.2 authorizing an alteration and extension of a 
non-conforming single family dwelling, and to allow the 
existing structure to remain within the front and side yard 
setback for property located at 15 Congress Street. 
(Assessor's Map 7, Parcel 24) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the construction of a shed within 
the side and rear yard setback for property located at 60 
Roosevelt Road. (Assessor's Map 6, Parcel 8) 



Case 107-89 
Ralph E. Newhouse 
Colonial Data Partners 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with Section 6.4.3 
authorizing relief from parking regulations for property 
located at Lowell Street. (Assessor's Map 6, Parcels 6, 6B, 
9, 10 and 16) 



Case 108-89 
Ralph E. Newhouse 
Colonial Data Parners 



To acquire a variance authorizing the placement of parking 

spaces or other paved surfaces within a reserved setback 

area for property located at Colonial Park Mall on Lowell 

Street. (Assessor's Map 6, Parcel 6, 6B, 9, 10 and 16) 



Case 109-89 
Charles Trembley 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the construction of a garage within 
the required side-yard setback for property located at 4 
Biggar Avenue. (Assessor's Map 82, Parcel 109) 



Case 110-89 
Edward White 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the construction of a single family 
dwelling on a lot having insufficient area frontage, and 
lot width for property located on Reading Avenue. 
(Assessor's Map 55, Parcel 73A)(Lot 2) 



Case 111-89 
Edward White 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the construction of a single family 
dwelling on a lot having insufficient area, frontage and 
lot width for property located on Beverly Avenue. 
(Assessor's Map 55, Parcel 73A)(Lot 1) 



Case 112-89 
Masonic Temple 



Case 113-89 

Ohio Street Realty 

Trust 



Case 114-89 

Ohio Street Realty 

Trust 



Case 115-89 
Stephen R. Holland 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with Section 4.1.9 
authorizing the construction of a sign for the purpose of 
advertising open air sales on weekends for property located 
on Church Street. (Assessor's Map 55, Parcel 6) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the construction of a single 
family dwelling on a lot with less than required side yard 
setback for a corner lot for property located on Lot 12 New 
Hampshire Road. (Assessor's Map 35, Parcels 49 and 50) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the construction of a single 
family dwelling on a lot with less than required side yard 
setback for property on Lot 8 New Hampshire Road. 
(Assessor's Map 35, Parcel 51) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the existing structure to remain as 
situated for property located on 35A Crescent Street. 
(Assessor's Map 54, Parcel 88C) 



-56- 



Case 116-89 
Paul Lee 



Case 117-89 
Ski Town 



Case 118-89 

Eastern Billiard Supply 



Case 119-89 

Ohio Street Realty Trust 



Case 120-89 

Ohio Street Realty 

Trust 



Case 121-89 
Robert Garni in 



Case 122-89 
Richard Stuart 



Case 123-89 
Richard Stuart 



Case 12A-89 
Charles HcAveeney 



Case 125-89 
Dennis Sullivan 



Case 126-89 
Jeanne E. Begonis 



REASOW FOR APPEAL 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the construction of a shed within 
the rear yard setback on a non-conforming lot for property 
located at 16 Harjorie Road. (Assessor's Hap 55, Parcel 
196) 

To acquire a special permit to construct a tent for a tent 
sale for property located at 320 Lowell Street. 
(Assessor's Map 73, Parcel 53) 

To appeal the decision of the Building Inspector and to 
acquire a special permit authorizing that "Boomers" be 
allowed to sell capped soda and steamed hot dogs in a 
General Industrial Zone for property located at 780 Main 
Street. (Assessor's Map 38 Parcel 1C) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the construction of a single family 
dwelling on a lot having insufficient frontage for property 
located on Lot 16 Vermont Road. (Assessor's Map 35, 
Parcels 55A & 55B) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the construction of a single family 
dwelling within the rear yard setback for property located 
on Lot 3 Indian Road. (Assessor's Map 36, Parcel 131) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the construction of a single family 
dwelling on a pre-existing lot having insufficient frontage 
and area for property located on Reading Avenue. 
(Assessor's Map 55, Parcel 50) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the construction of a single family 
dwelling on a lot with insufficient width, frontage, rear 
and side yard setbacks for property located on Phelps 
Street. (Assessor's Map 84, Parcel UA) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the construction of a single family 
dwelling on a lot with insufficient width, frontage, rear 
and side yard setbacks for property located on Curtis 
Street. (Assessor's Map 84, Parcel 148) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the construction of a single family 
dwelling on a lot having insufficient width and front, rear 
and side yard setbacks for property located on Fourth 
Avenue. (Assessor's Map 11, Parcel 39A) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the existing shed to remain within 
the side yard setback for property located at 84 Alrich 
Road. (Assessor's Map 19, Parcel 15) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the existing dwelling and pool to 
remain as situated within the lot, and to allow the 
construction of a garage within the side yard setback for 
property located at 12 Cedar Street. (Assessor's Map 30, 
Parcel 22A and 23) 



DECISION 
Granted 



Denied 



Granted 



-57- 



APPLICANT 



REASON FOR APPEAL 



DECISION 



Case 127-89 
Kevin M. Roy 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the construction of a storage 
shed within the side and rear yard setbacks for property 
located at 7 Grand Street. (Assessor's Map 31, Parcel 57) 



Case 128-89 
Bruce Bennett 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the existing garage to remain as 
situated within the side yard setback for the property 
located at 78 Grove Avenue. (Assessor's Hap 34, Parcel 4) 



Granted 



Case 129-89 
Lorraine E. Manuel 



To acquire a variance to subdivide the existing home located 
on a lot to contain 18,839 sq. ft., and the new proposed 
dwelling on Moore Street to contain a lot of 10,151 sq. 
ft.; with the new dwelling having a front setback of 30 ft. 
from Moore Street for property located at 277 Shawsheen 
Avenue. (Assessor's Map 22, Parcel 32) 



Case 130-89 
Katherine Blaisdell 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the construction of an addition 
within the side yard setbacks for property located at 65 
McDonald Road. (Assessor's Map 84, Parcel 60) 



Case 131-89 
Dorothy Marotta 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the construction of an aboveground 
pool within the rear yard lot line for property located at 
43 Oakdale Road. (Assessor's Map 81, Parcel 42) 



Case 132-89 
Sharon A. Cuoco 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the existing deck to remain as 
situated on property located on 8 Great Neck Drive. 
(Assessor's Map 86, Parcel 8C) 



Case 133-89 
Frank Graney 



To obtain a special permit in accordance with Section 
4.1.7.3 of the Zoning By-laws for the use of a trailer for 
non-construction storage for property located at 845 Woburn 
Street. (Assessor's Map 37, Parcel 6) 



Granted 



Case 134-89 
Joseph Robarge, 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with Section 
6.1.2.2 authorizing an alteration and extension of a 
non-conforming single family dwelling; and a variance to 
allow the existing dwelling and shed to remain as situated 
for property located at 80 Grove Avenue. (Assessor's Map 
34, Parcel 5) 



Case 135-89 
Constance A. 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the existing dwelling to remain as 
situated on a non-conforming lot until a new house is 
finished at that time, existing structure will be 
demolished for property located at 4 Cedar Street. 
(Assessor's Map 30, Parcel 20) 



Case 136-89 
R. Nichols 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the existing dwelling to remain and 
to construct an addition within the side yard setback for 
property located at 49 Salem Street. (Assessor's Map 70, 
Parcel 94) 



Case 137-89 
Douglas D. Anderson 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table II) authorizing the existing shed to remain within 
the side and rear yard setbacks for property located at 7 
Oakdale Road. (Assessor's Map 80, Parcel 29) 




Case 138-89 

Richard J. DeGregory 



Case 139-89 
Daniel Bemis 



Case UO-89 
Eastern Bill iard 



Case U1-89 

Frank & Linda Monroe 



Case S-1-89 
Edward Hill 



Case S-2-89 

Key-Jay Realty Trust 



Case S-3-89 

Key-Jay Realty Trust 



Case S-4-89 

Key-Jay Realty Trust 



Case S-5-89 
John Brown 



Case S-6-89 
Edward J. Hullin 



Case S-7-89 
C.A. Hack 



Case S-8-89 

Daniel and Anne Devine 



Case S-9-89 

Daniel and Anne Devine 



Case S-10-89 

Daniel and Anne Devine 



Case S-11-89 

Daniel and Anne Devine 



Case S-12-89 

Daniel and Anne Devine 



Case S-13-89 

Daniel and Anne Devine 



Case S-U-89 

Daniel and Anne Devine 



REASON FOR APPEAL 

To acquire a variance to raze an existing dwelling and 
construct a new dwelling on a lot having insufficient area, 
frontage and lot width and also to construct said dwelling 
within the required front and rear yard setbacks for 
property located at 114 Grove Avenue. (Assessor's Hap 34, 
Parcel 22A) 

To acquire a variance to raze an existing dwelling and 
construct a new dwelling on a lot having insufficient area 
and lot width for property located at 129 Grove Avenue. 
(Assessor's Hap 34, Parcel 81) 

To acquire a special permit in accordance with Section 
4.1 (Accessory Use) authorizing the sale of limited food 
products as dictated by the Board of Health. (Assessor's 
Hap 38, Parcel 1C) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations 
(Table 11) authorizing the existing structure to remain as 
situated on a lot and to obtain authorization for a second 
floor addition. (Assessor's Hap 7, Parcel 9) 

Official Hap Cases 1989 

On a way known as Lee Street. 



On a way known as Cary Street. 
On a way known as Cary Street. 
On a way known as Cary Street. 
On a way known as 19 Cedar Street. 
On a way known as 4 Winston Avenue. 
On a way known as Clark Terrace. 
On a way known as Avon Street. 

On a way known as Avon Street and Littlewood Road. 

On a way known as Littlewood Road. 

On a way known as Bui finch Road. 

On a way known as Bulfinch Road. 

On a way known as Bulfinch Road 

On a way known as Bulfinch Road 



DECISION 
Granted 



Granted 
Granted 
Granted 
Granted 
Granted 
Granted 



Ui thdrawn 
Granted 
Granted 
Granted 



Granted 



-59- 



Case S-1S-89 
Michael Sullivan 

Case S-16-89 
Charles F. Tynan 

Case S-17-89 
Robert G. Peterson 

Case S-18-89 
Robert G. Peterson 

Case S-19-89 
William Cole 

Case S-20-89 
Peter DeGennaro 



Official Map Cases 1989 

On a way known as Pineview Road. 

On a way known as Uirth Avenue. 

On a way known as Wall Street. 

On a way known as Waltham Street. 

On a way known as Bancroft Street and Lang Street. 

On a way known as Lynch Lane. 



Granted 
Granted 
Granted 
Granted 
Granted 
Granted 



Case S-21-89 
Peter DeGennaro 

Case S-22-89 

C & N Realty Trust 

Case S-23-89 

C & N Realty Trust 

Case S-24-89 

C & N Realty Trust 

Case S-25-89 
Peter DeGennaro 

Case S-26-89 
Reading Realty Trust 

Case S-27-89 
Joe Courtney 



Case S-28-89 

Town of Wi Imington 

Case S-29-89 
B.C.T. Realty Trust 

Case S-30-89 
B.C.T. Realty Trust 

Case S-31-89 
Joyce Brisbois 

Case S-32-89 
Joseph Cataldo 

Case S-33-89 
Edward Hill 

Case S-34-89 
Edward Hill 

Case S-35-89 
Edward Hill 



On a way known as Gorham Street, 



On a way known as Buckingham Street, 
(formerly Commonwealth Avenue) 

On a way known as Buckingham Street, 
(formerly Commonwealth Avenue) 

On a way known as Buckingham Street, 
(formerly Commonwealth Avenue) 



Case S-36-89 
John Gennetti 



On a way known as Paris Street. 
On a way known as Cary Street. 
On a way known as Bradford Road. 
On a way known as Everett Avenue. 
On a way known as Daniels Drive. 
On a way known as Medford Street. 
On a way known as John Street. 
On a way known as Hardin Road. 
On a way known as Ash Street. 
On a way known as Ash Street. 
On a way known as Ash Street. 
On a way known as Roosevelt Road. 



Granted 
Granted 
Granted 
Granted 
Granted 
Granted 
Granted 
Granted 
Granted 
Granted 
Granted 
Granted 
Granted 
Granted 



-60- 



Case S-37-89 
Edward Uhite 



Case S-38-89 
Robert Garni in 



Case S-39-89 

Ohio Street Realty Trust 



Case S-40-89 
Richard Stuart 



Case S-41-89 
Richard Stuart 



Case S-42-89 
Joseph Langone 



Case S-A3-89 
Joseph Langone 



Case S-A4-89 
James Mangano 



Case S-45-89 
R. Ribeiro 



Case S-A6-89 
Kevin J. McMi llan 



Case S-47-89 
Kevin J. McMillan 



Case S-48-89 
Stephen Lawrenson 



Case S-49-89 
Stephen Lawrenson 



Official Map Cases 1989 

On a way known as Beverly Avenue. 

On a way known as Reading Avenue. 

On a way known as Lot 16 Vermont Road. 

On a way known as Phelps Road. 

On a way known as Curtis and Phelps Streets. 

On a way known as Curtis Street. 

On a way known as Curtis and Phelps Streets. 

On a way known as Avery Street. 

On a way known as Lot 95 Rustic Lane. 

On a way known as Canyon Street. 

On a way known as McGrane Road. 

On a way known as Somerville Avenue. 

On a way known as Somerville Avenue. 



Granted 

Granted 

Granted 

Denied 

Denied 

Denied 

Denied 

Granted 

Granted 

Granted 

Granted 

Granted 

Granted 



Council for the Arts 



The year 1989 saw the achievement of many plans by the Wilmington Council for the Arts. Art exhibitions, 
concerts, demonstrations, and art classes enriched the artistic and cultural quality of the Town of 
Wilmington which is blessed to have as its Art Center the beautiful "Old Town Hall". The gracious main 
gallery with its enormous windows is a fitting place to display visual arts. Here, the paintings of three 
generations of an old Wilmington family were shown on one ocassion where the music of piano and organ in 
concert created a harmonious background. 

Funds allocated by the Massachusetts Arts Lottery supply the means whereby the local council may provide 
grants and scholarships to deserving applicants. This year ten grants were awarded. Two scholarships to 
pursue educations in Theater and Visual Arts respectively were give to Lauren Beth Bishop and Douglas J. 
Michaud. Seven PASS (Performing Arts Students Series) awards accorded 580 Wilmington students the 
opportunity to attend live performing arts events. Funds provided by the Massachusetts PASS program (which 
is carefully monitored by the Massachusetts Arts Lottery Council) made this possible. The Wilmington 
Council spends many hours (individually and as a whole) screening applicants for Arts Lottery Grants in an 
effort to be completely fair to each applicant. After approval by the council, the successful applications 
are submitted to the state for approval, and they have strict guidelines. 

The Ninth Annual Art Exhibition by the Arts Council was held this year on Saturday, July 1 and over 200 
people came to view the more than 75 works of art in exhibition. Three distinguished artists acted as 
judges: Eleanor Mahoney, Beatric MacLellan and Roberta Thresher. 



-61- 



First prize in oils was won by Andrea Peters, well-known Wilmington artist; first prize in watercolors went 
to Elaine Bradley; first prize in pastels was won by Dorothy Richards; first prize in photography was given 
to Ray Capodanno, and Joan Ward won first prize in Miscellaneous. The John D. Brooks Memorial Award is the 
only one sleeted by the council and it is given to a Wilmington artist who has shown the most promise and 
progress in his work. This year it was awarded to Charlotte McCain for her collage entitled "Five of 
Hearts". "Music and Art in the Afternoon" was a delightful occasion on a Sunday afternoon in May. Art of 
local artists and high school students was exhibited while music of the High School Show Choir (show had 
recently performed in Washington, D.C.) under the direction if Toby Simon and a trio of piano, cello and 
flute made for a memorable afternoon. Miss Lorraine Kali I, director of performing and fine arts at the high 
school added welcome words of tribute to the Wilmington Arts Council. In December a Christmas concert by Ms. 
May Bliss at piano and Ms. Aloha Jaynes at the organ made a Sunday afternoon in 1989 a very happy occasion 
for the many who attended the combined art exhibition and concert. It was the first time the organ had been 
used in public and the response was so enthusiastic that a Spring Concert is planned with the same performers 

Art demonstrations proved very successful this year and one on framing and preserving art work by Mr. Bruce 
Jope, who has galleries in Wilmington and Provi ncetown, drew a large number of interested participants. A 
demonstration in November by four artists in oils, watercolors, pastels and portraiture in charcoal was also 
extremely successful. There is never a charge for these events. 

Art classes have been overwhelmingly successful in 1989. Lessons oil, watercolor, and portrait painting were 
so widely accepted that, in many cases, classes could not accommodate the number of applicants. The charge 
for these lessons is minimal and many a person, old or young, has acquired a joy in painting. Lessons given 
in summer to children were so enthusiastically received that one young artist preferred his lessons to 
vacation with his family. 

Bus trips were made in 1989 to the Boston Pops and the Museum of Fine Arts. An ARTBUS trip is planned for 
the "Monet Series" at the MFA in early February of 1990. 

Council members attend many out-of-town workshops and demonstrations and art exhibitions to maintain a 
state-of-the-art awareness. 

The musical group, "Sweet Adelines", who won international acclaim in Paris during the past summer, meet and 
rehearse in the Center weekly. 

The Arts Council operates on an extremely limited budget so donations in almost any form are welcomed. A 
generous contribution was made by community schools and also by generous-minded individuals. Particularly 
welcomed this year were two paintings by Anne MacOougall, who donated them to the Art Center. Ms. McDougall 
is an accomplished former Wilmington resident and her large watercolor and serigraph are proudly acknowledged 
by the Arts Counci I . 

An addition to the center, an item which brought the most satisfaction to members was an access ramp for the 
disabled. It was professionally constructed by town workers under the direction of Mr. Roger J. Lessard, 
Superintendent of Public Buildings. This ramp is a vital necessity which now permits everyone to enter and 
enjoy the benefits this beautiful old building is making possible for this community. The council is 
grateful to Mr. Lessard and his men who have done so much. 

Officers of the Council for the Arts are: Elizabeth White, Chairperson; Edith Michelson, Vice Chairperson; 
Anne Buzzell, Treasurer; Evelyn Choate, Recording Secretary; Frances D. Keough, Corresponding Secretary. The 
Council is greateful for the support of the people of Wilmingtn, the Town Manager, and the Board of Selectmen. 



-62- 



Metropolitan Area Planning Council 



with the support of Uilmington and 100 other communities in the Boston region, the Metropolitan Area Planning 
Council (MAPC) was able to continue to provide planning services, information and advice for regional 
communities during 1989. 

Throughout the year, MAPC concentrated on refining MetroPlan 2000, the regional growth plan adopted in 
principle by representatives at the 1989 Annual Meeting in May. The regional development framework will aid 
communities in designating potential growth areas based on the availability of infrastructure, and in 
designating areas where growth should be discouraged. 

Uith a regional plan, growth can be directed so that affordable housing issues are addressed, open space and 
environmentally sensitive areas are protected, and transportation habits that contribute to traffic 
congestion and air pollution are changed. 

At the same time, planned growth can encourage new job opportunities by providing incentives for growth in 
specific areas. In addition, with a shortage of funds to build new roads or maintain old ones, planned 
growth encourages the best use of limited resources, such as in the Uilmington Town Center area. 

In addition to MetroPlan 2000 planning efforts, MAPC staff produces community population and employment 
forecasts, and updated the development file and vacant sites survey for each community. Some communities 
also took advantage of information programs, and met with MAPC planners to discuss the federal Transportation 
Improvement Program, trip reduction tools, curb cut controls and impact fees. 

The Town of Wilmington has become an active participant in the North Suburban Planning Council, which 
discusses subregional issues of common concern to each community. MAPC is also developing a suburban 
mobility workshop to lessen traffic congestion in the Route 128/93 area. 

In Fiscal Year 1989, Wilmington contributed $3,338 to MAPC for regional planning services. 



This year has proven to be year of great transition and change for the Wilmington Housing Authority. Two 
vacancies existed with the retirement of Bill Strob and the relocation of Warren Newhouse to Montana. The 
temporary vacancies were filled by appointment of two new board members, Joan Sadowski and Mary Keough, until 
the next election. The Uilmington Housing Authority is proud to welcome these past, dedicated, town board 
members aboard. 

1989 has proven to be a busy and dynamic year for ongoing construction projects. Goundbreaking for 32 units 
of elderly housing commenced last December, 1988 and is in the final construction stages. Occupancy is 
slated for March, 1990. The 32 units are comprised of 26 conventional units, 2 handicap accessible, and 4 
congregate units. There has been extensive renovation of our present community hall, office, kitchen, 
laundry and maintenance areas. The tenants are eagerly awaiting completion of the Community Building to 
resume their social activities. 

The "design review process" is still proceeding with Executive Office of Communities & Development for the 
construction of a home for autistic children. At the present time, a desireable site selection seems to be 
delayed and has set the development schedule on hold. 

The Wilmington Housing Authority has three ongoing projects for family housing. Funding has been secured for 
two of the homes. We were fortunate to be selected from the lottery by the Shawsheen Technical School for a 
family home to be built by the school. An article for conveyance of a parcel of land by the town to the 
Uilmington Housing Authority and/or the Community Development Corporation passed at the Annual Town Meeting 
in April, 1989. The other two homes are being built by Ohio Realty Trust through an agreement reached with 
the developers and Board of Appeals. 

The present board members are Kevin McMillan, Chairman; Dan Gills, Vice Chairman; Joan Sadowski, Secretary 
Elaine Hachey, Treasurer; Betty Keough, Vice Treasurer. Office staff consists of our Executive Director, 
Ella Belmore and Administrative Assistant, Phyllis Tumsaroch. Edward Melanson is our maintenance person. 

The Authority is proud of its accomplishments and would like to thank the endeavors or our past board 
members. Bill Strob and Uarren Newhouse for their support, work and time. Ue would also like to thank the 
townspeople. Town Manager, Board of Selectmen, Department of Public Uorks, Uilmington Community Development 
Corporation, Uilmington Affordable Housing Task Force for their support and work on various ongoing projects. 




-63 



Water & Sewer Department 



WATER 

The Edmund H. Sargent Water Treatment Plant was put into service on May 2, 1989, with all state approvals 
being met. 

An open house was held on September 16, 1989. The open house was attended by many neighborhood residents 
and Water Department personnel. 

The contracts for the 3.0 million gallon water storage tank and connecting water mains were awarded. 
Except for landscaping the tank is complete and was put into full service December, 1989. 

The Water Department has obtained the services of a consulting firm to study and prepare "Aquifer Protection 
Zoning By-Laws" to be adopted at the Annual Town Meeting (1990). 

Many "Water Impact Reports" were reviewed for proposed sub-divisions. 

Unpaid water and sewer bills for 1988, in the amount of $52,941.02, were committed as liens to the Tax 
Col lector. 



The Northeast Sewer Interceptor design is still ongoing. Survey work on private property is being done 
where access permission has been obtained. 

Nine hundred feet of sewer interceptor has been cleaned in the South Main Street area. 

Approximately 2,200 feet of sewer is to be constructed in Main Street, from the junction of Route 38 and 
Route 129 to Cross Street. Construction is expected to start early 1990. 

A sewer rate increase was reflected in the October, 1989 sewer billing. Most of the sewer rate increase was 
due to the sewer assessment charges from the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority. Charges for FY-1990 
are $660,581.00. 

PUMPING STATISTICS 

WATER SUPPLY 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 

Maximum Gallons 4,228,700 4,193,300 5,130,700 4,518,100 4,912,000 4,064,500 

Per Day 

Maximum Gallons 26,093,500 24,598,300 28,474,500 29,735,500 29,811,200 22,565,700 

Per Week 

Maximum Gallons 100,396,500 101,415,100 110,876,900 124,240,900 120,030,100 97,243,800 
Per Month 

Average Gallons 2,780,674 3,024,474 2,966,701 3,192,664 3,245,345 2,823,110 

Per Day 

Average Gallons 84.578.825 91 .994.400 90.320.492 95.779.920 98.712.563 85.869.600 

Per Month 

Total Gallons 1,014,945,900 1,103,932,800 1,082,845,900 1,185,567,065 1,184,550,563* 1,030,435,200* 
Per Year 

•Includes water purchased from other systems 

Annual Rainfall 47.61" 36.38" 41.94" 38.41" 36.10" 42.66" 

CONSUMPTION STATISTICS - GALLONS 
Residential Use* 413,005,845 408,518,662 411,814,446 474,675,803 432,331,418 403,228,522 
Percent of Total 50.6% 46. IX 41. 3X 40.71X 47.64X 39X 

Industrial Use 402,034,245 477,200,640 469,455,823 631,254,953 470,317,313 457,822,530 
Percent of Total 49. 3X 53. 8X 58. 7X 59.29X 51.83X 44X 

Total Water 

Metered 815,040,090 885,719,302 881,270,269 1,109,869,081 907,415,379 857,301,052 



-64- 



Percent of Water 
Pumped** 



81X 



80. 2X 



87.54X 



95.19X 



76.60% 



83X 



*Residential use includes small commercial users, that is, all water passing through 5/8" meters. 

**The difference between the water pumped and the water metered, 173,134,148 gallons in 1989, represents 
water used for flushing of water mains, flushing and filling new water mains, for fires, street sweeping and 
other hydrant uses, testing new water treatment plant before acceptance by department and water lost due to 
main breaks. 



WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM 

The following new mains were constructed during 1989: 



Street 
Olmstead Avenue 
Harriett a Avenue 
Pearl Court 
Crystal Road 
Whitefield Elms 
Andover Street 
Dunmore Road 
Waltham Street 
Upton Court 
Hall Street 
Dewey Avenue 
Naples Road 
Second Avenue 
Dunton Road 
Clark Terrace 

New Hampsh i re/Rand/Garvi n Road 

Cristo/Vermont Road 

Amherst Road 

Henry L. Drive 

Lynch Road 

Buckingham Road 

Allgrove Estates 

Cross country for new water tank 



Amount 
375' 
750' 
225' 
950' 

1650' 
475' 
300' 
370' 
240' 
123' 
200' 
300' 

1275' 
234' 
242' 

2100' 
700' 

1500' 
600' 
268' 
450' 
900' 



Size 



Hydrants 



6" 
8" 
6" 
8" 
12" 
12" 
6" 
6" 
12" 
8" 
6" 
6" 
8" 
6" 
6" 
8" 
8" 
8" 
8" 
8" 
8" 
8" 



1 
2 

3 
5 
1 
1 
1 

1 

1 
3 
1 
1 
4 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
3 
1 



Total 



3.100 ' 
17,327' 



12"/ 16" 



Total water mains installed during 1989 - 17,327' or 3.14 miles 
There have been 41 new hydrant added to the system 



-65- 



Department of Public Works 



In accordance with the Bylaws of the Town of Wilmington, I hereby respectfully submit the Annual Report on 
the activities of the Department of Public Works for the year 1989. 

The Department of Public Works consists of six (6) divisions: Highway, Tree, Cemetery, Parks & Grounds, 
Engineering and Rubbish Collection and Disposal. 

* DPW - HIGHWAY DIVIS10M-(658-4481 ) * 

All maintenance work was carried out during the year, such as cleaning catch basins, patching streets, 
making and installing street and warning signs, cutting brush along our roadsides, grading back roads, 
replacing broken curbing, painting and replacing guardrails, etc. 

Safety Mirrors ; 

Safety mirrors were installed at the following locations: Butters Row at the bridge, Hopkins Street at 
Dorchester Street and Glen Road and Drury Lane. These mirrors have been installed to help eliminate 
accidents. 

Drainage : 

Drainage systems were installed, repaired or extended at the following streets: Lawrence Street, Church 
Street, West Street, Shawsheen Avenue, Ballardvale Street, Andover Street, Jones Avenue, Cottage Street, 
Clorinda Road, Linda Road, Clark Street and Deming Way. 

Chapter 90 Construction: 

The reconstruction of Aldrich Road sidewalks is ongoing. 
Chapter 90 Maintenance and Hot Top Program: 

The following roads were upgraded with bituminous concrete: Shawsheen Avenue from Billerica line to Hopkins 
Street and from Ferguson Road to beyond Canal Street, Andover Street from Andover line to Route 125 and 
Edwards Road. 

Snow & I ce Remove I : 

We only had 13.5 inches of snow for the year. 
Sidewalks : 

Constructed a sidewalk on Shawsheen Avenue from Nichols Street to beyond Harold Street. 

* DPW - TREE DlVISION-(658-2809) * 

The Tree Division carried out all regular maintenance such as trimming, cutting spraying and removing trees. 
We had to remove 58 roadside trees that were dead or interfered with public safety. Hornet nests were 
removed upon request from residents. The Town Common was illuminated with a fine display of Christmas 
lights again this year. 

Dutch Elm Disease: 

Samples of Elm Trees, believed to be diseased, were sent to the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, to 
be tested. As a result we removed 2 diseased trees. 

Mosqui to Control : 

The Town has joined the Central Massachusetts Mosquito Control Project. With this regional approach we are 
able to provide our Town with a good, environmentally sound ,and cost effective mosquito control. There are 
three basic control methods which are practiced by the Central Massachusetts Mosquito Control Project. They 
are Source Reduction, Larviciding and Adulticiding. 

Insect Pest Control: 

Spraying was done to try to control Elm Leaf Beetles, Ticks, Gypsy Moth, Japanese Beetles, Eastern Tent 
Caterpillars. Spraying was also done to control the spread of poison ivy. 



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* DPW - CEMETERY DIVISION-(658-3901 ) * 



All regular maintenance was carried out through the year, such as mowing grass, weeding, trimming, reset 
markers, winter graves were loamed and seeded, foundations for monuments were poured, etc. 



Burials 




Receipts 




Died in Wi Imington 


U 


Interments 


$19,000.00 


Died elsewhere 


42 


Foundations for 


3,181.75 






monuments 




Non-Residents 


40 


Affidavits 


4.00 


Cremations 


20 


Deeds 


60.00 


Infants 


3 


Copies of Deeds 


2.00 




119 




$22,247.75 


Reserve 




Trust Fund 




Sale of Lots $20,238.00 


Perpetual Care 


$17,950.00 





TOTAL $60,435.75 

* DPW - PARKS & GROUNDS D I VI S ION - (658-4481 ) 

All regular maintenance was carried out throughout the year such as cutting grass, trimming shrubs, marking 
ballfields for baseball, Softball, football, field hockey and soccer. 

The following are some of the highlights: 

1. High School Football Field - Reconstructed the High School varsity football field with new loam, a 
sprinkler system and sod. 

2. Hot topped the parking lots at the Woburn Street School and the Council on Aging. 

3. Installed park benches at the Wildwood School and Silver Lake. 

4. Upgraded the Shawsheen and Woburn Street School tennis courts. 

5. Assisted the Public Buildings Department with the construction of the storage shed at the High School 
football field. 

6. Installed the new front walk at the High School. 

7. Assisted the Woburn Street School parents group with the painting of the hot top and installed playground 
equipment . 

8. Upgraded the front of the High School grounds by removing some of the shrubs and replacing with sod. 

*DPW - ENGINEERING D I VI S ION - (658-4499)* 

The Engineering Division assisted Town departments, boards and commissions with engineering related projects, 
such as but not limited to: 

Parks & Grounds Division - Layout plan for the High School athletic field expansion. 

Highway Division - 

a. To find solutions for the many drainage problems throughout the Town. 

b. The relocation layout to straighten the curve on Burlington Avenue near Harris Street. 

c. The relocation of Deming Way to allow for the installation of new traffic lights at this location. 

d. The layout plan for the recycling drop-off center on Main Street. 

Cemetery Division - Set layout and grades for Cemetery expansion. 

Planning Board - Made recommendation on subdivisions and inspected roadways during construction. 

*RUBBISH COLLECTION AND DISP0SAL-(658-4481)* 

The contract for rubbish collection and disposal is a function of the Department of Public Works. If taxpayers 
have any questions, suggestions or complaints, please call the above number. 



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I would like to take this time to thank the Recycling Advisory Committee for all their efforts in setting up th 
recycling drop-off center at the No. Uoburn Line. We opened in October and we have already noticed a reducti 
in the waste stream. Due to recycling. FY'91 budget will be the first budget since FY'84 that I will be 
requesting less funds than the previous year. I would also like to thank all the volunteers who staff the 
recycling drop-off center. They are a vital part of the ongoing success. 

In concluding my report, I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Police Department for keeping us 
informed during the winter months of the road conditions, between the hours of 3:00 p.m. and 6:30 a.m. weekdays 
weekends and holidays; the Water Department for their help during snow storms, and all various departments for 
the cooperation extended during the year. I would like to thank the Town Manager, the Assistant Town Manager 
and the Board of Selectmen for their support throughout the year. Last but not least, to the dedicated 
employees of all divisions of the Department of Public Works who made 1989 a very productive year, my sincere 
thanks and appreciation. 



Handicapped Affairs Commission 



Being that this is the Handicapped Affairs Commission's first annual report, a brief history is in order. In 
October, 1982, a committee, at the request of the Wilmington Board of Selectmen, was formed to study the 
situation regarding the disabled of Wilmington. John Brown was elected chairman. The study centered on the 
present situation, what was made available and what needs there might be. It was noted that there was no 
physical access availability for persons who used wheelchairs to any of the town's departments. 

The Committee went over all information at hand, adopted the name A.I.M. (Access Is Mandatory), (a.k.a. "AIM" o 
"the AIM Committee"), as access was the most obvious need. A questionnaire was deemed necessary to contact the 
disabled population regarding needs. 

With direct input by the Deaf Community, the need for a T.D.D. (Telecommunication Device for the Deaf) was 
established for emergencies to the police and fire departments and one for general information in the public 
library. Public awareness was also deemed necessary and important. 

In October, 1983, Laurence Curtis was elected chairman. The purchase and installation of a T.D.D. was arranged 
for the police and fire departments. A handicapped questionnaire was drawn up and printed and Wilmington Boy 
Scout Troops volunteered to deliver it to all the households of Wilmington. Two hundred returns were received, 
establishing transportation, public access, H.P. parking, and social as the primary needs of Wilmington's 
Disabled Community. 

Chairman Curtis and Carol Beaudoin joined the state funded Transportation Advocacy Action Project, studying 
wheelchair accessible transportation for greater knowledge regarding the stated need. They joined the 
Massachusetts Coalition of Citizens with Disabilities, Inc. for better cross-disability awareness, 
organizational knowledge and negotiating strength. They then convinced the A.I.M, Committee to join, and become 
the local chapter of M.C.C.D. They then volunteered as members of the Organizational Board and Priority Issues 
Board of M.C.C.D. 



The issue of there being no wheelchair access to town departments was brought to the attention of the Board of 
Selectmen because of potential civil rights violations under the Federal 504 Laws. In 1984, the Town had the 
Glen Road School renovated and turned into the new town hall making all departments within the town government, 
that can be physically moved, now accessible. AIM brought the issue of parking permits to the attention of the 
police department, and ideas were exchanged on the matter. We felt the social issue was too great an issue for 
the committee, as is, to deal with effectively and re-organizational issues were entertained. As a result of 
the re-organizational study, we decided to create a Handicapped Affairs Commission, as an integral part of town 
government in compliance with state guidelines (Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 40, Section 8(J)), and to 
incorporate the AIM Committee into a non-profit organization. 

Public awareness was increased through the questionnaire, numerous letters written to the editor of the local 
paper (Town Crier), interviews were done with the Lowell Sun newspaper and on State Representative Jim Miceli's 
talk show on the local cable station, participation in local fund raisers (i.e. Community Fund Walk-a-Thon, of 
which A.I.M. was awarded most effective adult group) and by submitting the article for the creation of a 
Handicapped Affairs Commission for the upcoming Town Meeting. 



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In April 1985 Chairman Curtis submitted, for the Annual Town Meeting, the article to form a Handicapped Affairs 
Commission which was voted on and unanimously approved by the Town's voters. Membership in the Wilmington 
Handicapped Affairs Commission, (a.k.a. "the Commission" or "W.H.A.C."), in accordance with state guidelines, 
was then established, having as great a cross-disability representation as possible and an elected or appointed 
member of town government. Selectman Dan Ballou. At the first official meeting of said Commission, Laurence 
Curits was elected Chairman and basic organizational issues (i.e. by-laws) were dealt with. By-laws were 
established, submitted and approved by Town Manager and Town Council. 

The Commission's first tasks included such things as the additional T.D.D. for use in the public library 
purchased through negotiated funding by the Wilmington Cotnmunity Fund. Total accessibility of the newly 
renovated high school was established. The police department, as one of those non-movable town departments, had 
a ramp installed. Private public buildings are being addressed on an individual basis with owners as they build 
or renovate and with our present Building Inspector accessibility is a fact of law. As is the case with the 
Wilmington Branch of BayBank after the issue was raised they voluntarily ramped their building. DeMoulas Super 
Market was approached for adequate H.P. parking spaces. 

Transportation, being the most difficult issue to deal with due to expense, was finally established through the 
Committee's and Commission's working with the State Office of Transportation and Construction, M.B.T.A., the 
Governors Commission on Transportation, and with State Representative Jim Miceli. Wilmington, along with seven 
other communities in line with use and Boston, are now with wheelchair accessible vans provided by Share-a-Ride, 
Inc. and funded by the M.B.T.A. This service was set up as a pilot program, pending a six month trial basis, at 
which time it would be determined if there was a great enough need for the M.B.T.A. to take over on a greater 
scale. A public awareness campaign was enacted by the Committee and Commission to inform those eight towns with 
the intention of inducing maximum usage of said service thus assuring permanency. Wilmington's para-transit 
service is now permanent and expanded to "normal" M.B.T.A. operating hours. 

Mr. Curtis drew up, with AIM'S approval. By-laws and incorporation papers for the Committee in 1985. The State 
recognized the Wilmington Committee for Citizens with Disabilities, Inc. (a.k.a. "the Committee", "AIM 
Committee" or "W.C.C.D.") as a non-profit organization in April of 1986. At the first W.C.C.D. Board Meeting, 
from the appointed eleven member Board of Directors, officers were elected and Judy DiPalma was elected their 
first president. 

Through our negotiations with the Town Manager and the Fourth of July Committee in 1986, AIM headquarters was 
established in the Fourth of July Committee Building which was made fully accessible for our use. Private homes 
were being made accessible, according to the level of financial need, through the AIM Committee's established 
"Home Access Assistance Program" (HAAP). After W.C.C.D.s first annual meeting in 1987 an official Board of 
Directors was voted in by the dues paying membership and at the following Board Meeting officers were elected 
and Phyllis "Dee" Genetti was elected president. The following year Carol Beaudoin was elected president and 
again in 1989. 

Issues presently being addressed are, amongst others, accessible train stations, accessibility of all schools in 
Wilmington, accessibility of the last church not yet made accessible due to its age, accessibility of the Town 
Library to the blind and the continued advocacy regarding disabled person's civil rights. 

The basic requirements for meeting whatever needs citizens with disabilities of Wilmington may encounter in 
achieving their equal and civil rights are included in these two entities (W.H.A.C & W.C.C.D.) as best as we can 
forsee. W.H.A.C. and W.C.C.D. provide the means for direct involvement of the disabled, by the disabled and for 
the disabled in having an equal say in their own destiny. Through us and our associates; citizens of Wilmington 
with disabilities are trained as self advocates for the good of themselves and others who may share similar 
circumstances now and in the future thereby affecting the lives of all citizens, disabled or otherwise, for the 
better. 

In short, we are a socially and politically recognized component of our community and our intent is to influence 
all aspects of society into being inclusive, never again exclusive, with regard to persons with disabilities and 
their rightful place in the term "Public". We've got our foot in the door and we are holding our own. 

Members of the Wilmington Handicapped Affairs Commission: 

Laurence Curtis, Chairman 
Frank Botte 
L i I i an Brown 
Dee Genetti 

Selectman Robert Doucette 

We, the disabled, make up the largest minority in America, approximately 43,000,000 strong, that being 1,000,000 
from Massachusetts or 3,500 from Wilmington, and if we are to realize our civil rights and shed the unwarranted 
stigma associated with being a person with a disability, it will be by our direct and equal involvement in 
society, "for the truth will set you free". 

If you are disabled and wish to take part in the evolving Disabled Civil Rights Movement in America here at the 
grass roots level where democracy is at its purest, please contact the Town Manager or the Commission at the 
Town Hall. 



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School Department 



Guidance Department - Following a class meeting in the fall, Wilmington High School college-bound seniors 
and their Guidance Counselors attended the New England Association of College Admissions Counselors (NEACAC) 
"College Fair" at Merrimack College. Seniors had an opportunity to tour the fair, speak with admission 
officers and obtain a variety of materials, catalogues, and application forms. This was the largest of 
thirteen such fairs presented throughout New England during the fall. 

The Wilmington High School Guidance Department hosted two financial aid workshops in December and January 
for parents and students. Invited guests at the first workshop were Mrs. Grace Bartini, Assistant Director 
of the Massachusetts Education Loan Authority, and Mr. Charles Byron, Education Loan Officer of the Boston 
Five Bank. Mr. Anthony DeLuca, Accountant, presented the second workshop. Mrs. Florence Anthanasia, 
Chairman of the Guidance Department, and Mr. Edward Woods, Assistant Principal, presented local information 
to parents. Parents and students also received a Financial Aid Handbook which was prepared by the Guidance 
Department and FAF forms along with other relevant materials. 

In December the Guidance Department and the Home Economics Department co-hosted a senior reception in the 
teachers' Dining Room. This was for potential graduates and student alumni. The reception provided 
prospective seniors with an opportunity to speak informally with alumni and obtain first-hand information 
about college life or work experiences as well as speak to staff members in attendance. 

As a result of a Horace Mann Grant, a series of parent evening workshops on adolescent issues was offered 
monthly. Guest speakers from various mental health professional groups conducted these workshops. 

Testing Program: 

1. Conseling staff administers SAT/Achievements to Wilmington students during three Saturdays in 
November, January and May. 

2. PSATs were administered on Saturday, October 20th. 

3. The Advance Placement Exams were administered by the Guidance Couselors in May. 

4. The Armed Services Vocation Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) was administered by military personnel 
at Wilmington High School in December upon request. 

5. All grade nine students were tested in the Massachusetts Ability Test in October. 

6. Massachusetts Assessment Tests were administered to students in Grade 12 during their English 
classes in Apri I . 

The Guidance Information Service (GIS) program is provided to students upon request. This allowed students 
to explore career and college plans as well as take the Harrington O'Shea Career Decision Making System 
Interest Inventory. 

The Guidance Department presented all state and national scholarship information to students throughout the 
year as well as local scholarship information. 

All seniors completed a survey which provided information for the Guidance Department annual report on the 
status of the graduating class. 

College representatives met with college-bound seniors throughout the fall and winter. 

Services provided by the Guidance Department for students and parents: 

College Application (approximately 500 processed) 

Transcripts 

Work Papers 

Progress Reports 

Homework Requests 

Newsletters 

Student of the Month Program 
Scholarship Information and Applications 
End of the Year Report 

Materials prepared for students and parents include: 
College - A Guide 

College - A Guide (updated version) 
Financial Aid Booklet 

Home Economics - This year the Home Economics department is offering Child Development I and II . In Child 
Development I, students learn about the developing child from embryo to five years of age. One activity 
they participate in is the "egg baby project". They decorate the egg giving it a face, hair, etc. and they 
provide a carrier for their "baby". For approximately one week the students are responsible for the care of 
their "egg baby". They must keep the egg with them at all times or provide suitable care. In this way 
students experience some of the responsibility that a parent has when they have a baby. The students were 
very excited about this project this year, but learned very quickly how confining caring for a baby can be. 



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One of the experiences Child Development I students have this year is the opportunity to observe the 
pre-school classroom. This opportunity gives them a chance to see what really goes on in a pre-school, to 
observe the activities of the children, and to see the children progress in their development as the year 
passes. 

The Child Development II program and the pre-school program are running very smoothly for the first year. 
The pre-school teacher, Mrs. Smith, and the high school teacher Mrs. Altobello work very well together. 
They have coordinated the program to work effectively and provide the greatest learning opportunities for 
both the pre-schoolers and the high schoolers. 

All the students seem to be enjoying the program. Enthusiasm and motivation continue at a high level. The 
parents and special education staff seem very pleased with the pre-school progress and the adult to child 
ratio. 

The high schoolers are actively involved in the planning and participation of all phases of the pre-school 
program. Halloween activities and parade, a Thanksgiving turkey feast and a Holiday party for parents have 
been some of the successful activities planned by the high schoolers. 

In the regular Home Economics classes the program is very successful and meeting the needs of the students. 
The new and different thing that happened this year, was the introduction of a Vietnamese family who speak 
no English. The food courses which are hands on experiences, are helping them develop living skills, work 
skills, and skills in interpersonal relationship. 

Industrial Arts - The Furniture and Cabinet making curriculum is designed as a one-year course of study. 
This course of study was written to meet the needs of students about to enter the world of work, with 
specific job entry skills. The basic objectives they will develop are the ability to use and care for basic 
woodworking tools and equipment; to develop in each student an understanding of good construction techniques 
and finishing procedures for fine furniture; to develop logical, step by step design and construction 
procedures for the development of fine furniture construction to meet job-entry requirements with a sound 
base for growth. 

Upon compeletion of this course of study the student will have developed job-entry skills in relation to 
operation of woodworking machines, good joint construction, along with the knowledge of good overall 
furniture and cabinet construction. 

In our Metal I program we have added a manufacturing project. Here the students are given a project to 
design, jigs to be constructed, jobs to be applied for, and a product to be produced and placed in an 
attractive display, the results of this project were good, in that the students wanted to do similar work, 
learn about the design of the product, and the design and construction of the jigs needed to produce a 
uniform product. 

The Woodworking I classes are developing skills through the use of hand and machines toots. The students 
are concentrating on and relying on project plans for instruction and directions. Particular attention has 
been given to maintaining dimensions and sizes. 

Students are encouraged to design legs with a personal influence giving each project a unique look from the 
same basic design. 

During the second semester the class will evaluate and select a small furniture piece that they in turn 
produce as a group through mass production. 

The students in Electronics have spent the first semester gaining an understanding of the basic principles 
of component operation, Ohms Law, and various types of circuits. Experimentation with these new concepts, 
along with a thorough mathematical analysis has given the students a fine understanding of these sometime 
difficult concepts. 

Beginning with the second semester the student will use modeling and further experimentation to solidify 
their knowledge and understanding. Through project development they will apply knowledge of component 
performance, circuit analysis and improve assembly techniques. A way as to gain a practical use of the 
concepts they have studied to date. 

The Automotive class is progressing quite well. Students have been studying various systems of the 
automobile and the specific skills or repair that apply to these systems. Aspects of the brake systems, 
lubrication system, and cooling system maintenance have been taught during the first semester. 

Currently the class is learning about the operation of the ignition system. This will be followed up by 
diagnostic techniques related to the operation of the electronic ignition system. 



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Third term will be spent exploring the parts and operation of the internal combustion engine. Students will 
develop on their own project that will explore a system or particular part of a system. 

In Printing we are in the process of organizing with the Distributive Education Store to take orders for 
stationery, evelopes, or memos and have them printed in our department. 

Also, a interdiscipl ine project with the Art department who will do the art designs and overlays and the 
printing department will complete the printing. In this manner the students in both classes will have the 
opportunity to understand and observe the talents of the other department. 

Building to Scale is a course intended to be used in the classroom by the students who undertake the 
construction of their first model house. The students will convert a two-dimensional plan into a 
three-dimensional reality. Through the presentation of modern house building, and the accompanying 
classwork, we will acquaint the student with the fundamentals of house construction, stimulate their 
initiative to undertake independent study and to provide them with the sense of responsibility and the 
patience necessary for the successful completion of the project. 

Business Education Department - The Business Education students at Wilmington High School continue to 
benefit and learn business and marketing skills through traditional and modern techniques. Business 
students are taught innovative applications, examine and discuss the critical issues facing business today 
and strive to maintain a competetive edge in the marketplace. 

The dedicated Business staff preview, review and share with their students new developments in business 
education and in the business community. 

To supplement classroom learning, business students are participating in a Junior Achievement/private 
industry financed program. A similar highly successful program ran last year with Accounting students. 
This year, another element was introduced- - that of competition! Marketing/Management students are 
displaying their eagerness to test their marketing and corporate skills as they too elect officers to the 
board, name and produce a product and attempt to earn a profit by taking the risk of operating a business 
enterprise. 

Members of the simulated business community class Office of the 90's and other business students have 
enjoyed the privilege of observing at monthly meetings of the Wilmington Chamber of Commerce Executive 
Board. These observations link classroom learning with the real world. Opportunities such as those being 
rendered by the business community to the students of Business give "learning in school" a new dimension! 

Social Studies Department - The purpose of the social studies program in Wilmington is to prepare students 
for informed participation in a free society. Informed citizens understand the need to insure individual 
worth and dignity, to improve society and to recognize the interdependence of human kind. 

The social studies program draws from each of the social sciences. Utilizing exciting content from 
anthropology, sociology, history, economics, political science, and geography, the program also enriches 
interdisciplinary skills in reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Resources are drawn from a variety 
of print and nonprint materials. 

Thinking skills are enhanced and encouraged. Students are asked to formulate hypotheses, gather data, and 
test their hypotheses against the data. Students are encouraged to develop curiosity about social phenomena 
and to respect evidence even when it contradicts preconceptions. The program also develops apprec i at i onOOnd 
respect for the cultural contributions of others, as well as for their own. 

In conclusion, Wilmington students have participated in several competitions designed to test their ability, 
knowledge, and commitment to social studies. These include National History Day, National Geographic 
Geography Competition, Good Government Day, Law Day, Model U.N. and many other activities which enhance 
their knowledge and life experience. 

Foreign Language Department - Encouraged by foreign language teachers, about a dozen foreign language 
students put their language learning to the test last summer when they participated in an exchange program. 
Several traveled to either France or Spain to spend a month with a host family. Whether in a small town or 
in a big city, the students were isolated from other Americans and had to rely on their language skills to 
communicate with their new family. Having been totally immersed in the customs and culture of the country, 
they have become more cosmopolitan and appreciative of Europeans. Other students, although remaining in 
Wilmington, were also able to broaden their horizons as they hosted a teenager from either France or Spain. 
The lives of many local families were enriched as they helped the host families to entertain and welcome the 
foreign guests. 



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Our foreign language courses often combine the teaching of language with the teaching of culture. When 
students who participated in a summer exchange program with France and Spain returned to school in 
September, their comments about their language courses were very favorable. They said that the French and 
Spanish people that they had come in contact with were impressed not only with their language skills but 
also with the knowledge they had about the customs and history of Spain and France. 

Townspeople flocked to the high school in April to attend the Foreign Language Fair and to enjoy an array of 
foreign foods. The Greek and Italian restaurants, the French bakery, and the booths offering Spanish 
specialties were all very successful. Every student in the foreign language department helped in both the 
preparation of the food and in the setting up and running of the fair. All who attended were impressed with 
this "extravaganza". 

English Department - The English Department structures its courses to increase reading comprehension and to 
strengthen the students' ability to communicate orally and in writing. Course work in grades 7-12 exposes 
students to a variety of classical and world literature and facilitates the students' writing of expository 
and analytical essays. 

Writing is an important component of the program and students are frequently asked to write in the classroom 
and for homework in English classes as well as other classes. The process used to develop these skills 
includes prewriting, activities, outlining, organization, development of supporting details and revision and 
editing of the final product. 

Students receive instruction in preparation for the Massachusetts State Basic Skills Tests and the 
Scholastic Aptitude Tests. Opportunities are given for practice in composing, analogies, sentence 
completion, reading comprehension and vocabulary development. For example, a sequential vocabulary program 
is used by students in grades 9 and 10. Also, emphasis is placed on outside reading through assigned book 
reports and the English Department Summer Reading Program. 

Science Department - The Science Department has been awareded the Dwight D. Eisenhower grant for Science by 
the Department of Education. This grant will be used to further develop our new Basic Science curriculum by 
affording us the opportunity for teacher training, curriculum workshops, field trips for students, and the 
purchase of needed supplies and materials. 

In an effort to deal with the current budgetary restrictions, we in Science have opted to offer our elective 
courses on an alternate year basis. By doing so we are able to maintain the diversity of our offerings and 
still maintain the quality of our program. 

Mathematics Department - The Mathematics Department conducted two workshops to update the curriculum in 
.geometry. The workshops involved grades 7-12 and were made possible from Title II grants. A volunteer from 
the community provided evening tutoring to students in mathematics and another volunteer with the assistance 
of Textron taught a Fortran Programming course to some of our students during the summer. 

NORTH INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL 
Michael Tikonoff, Principal 
and 

UEST INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL 
James Jordan, Principal 

Teachers, parents, students and administrators at the North and West Intermediate Schools have been focusing 
their energies on the development of a Middle School Philosophy for Wilmington. A new philosophy statement 
was developed and adopted by the School Committee in the Fall of 1989. 

With the adoption of a new philosophy came a need to begin the planning for restructuring both Intermediate 
Schools. A Middle School Task Force was formed in order to develop successful strategies for positive 
change. The Task Force created several committees which are serving as agents for change. These committees 
are addressing areas such as: 

Middle Transition Teaming 
Student Transition Programs 
Scheduling Models 
Building Utilization 
Parental Involvement 
Interdisciplinary Teaching 
Student Issues 
Staff Development 



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With the opening of school in September, 1989 this process of change will require ongoing efforts on the 
part of parents and staff. 

WILDWOOD SCHOOL 
Robert J. Arsenault, Principal 

In celebration of Black History Month, Len Cabral will present two performances on January 17, 1990. The 
Uildwood School received a grant from the Wilmington Arts Lottery Council to help defray the cost of this 
storytel ler . 

Bill and Bob's Restaurant provided tee shirts and financial assistance for our after-school program last 
spring. Parents, teachers and Officer Shelley volunteered their time to present this program to the 
students. A wide range of activities was presented to the children from kindergarten through Grade 5. 

The students in Grades 3, 4 and 5 have been introduced to drama by Mr. James Murphy. This drama teacher 
meets with the students on a weekly basis and involves the students in many creative dramatic activities. 
In the spring the culminating activity will be a play presented to the parents. 

A "Friendly Quilt" is proudly displayed in the Uildwood Cafeteria. Every child in the school had the 
opportunity of tracing his/her hand on this special quilt. Each student was a part of this special 
rememberance which is a constant reminder of the Wildwood community working together and being accepted. 

Many physical improvements have been made to both the building and the playground during this past year. 
Plans are currently underway for replacing the burners which fire the furnace. The entire trim around the 
school has been recently painted. Benches have been added to the playground area and the equipment for the 
children continues to be improved. The Parent Advisory Council has worked closely with Mr. Palmer, of the 
Highway Department, to accomplish this goal. 

SHAWSHEEN SCHOOL 
Robert G. Coffill, Jr., Principal 
Michele C. Nortonen, Assistant Principal 

The Shawsheen Elementary School opened its doors in September with a student enrollment of 555 children. 
Since then, our enrollment has been gradually creeping upwards with the addition of over 15 new students. 
Our experienced staff of teachers is dedicated to providing every child with the best educational 
opportunity possible. Towards that end, many special services supplement our regular school program. 

The cooperative efforts of our Parent Advisory Council and its members have made it possible to provide 
enrichment assembly programs for our students in the areas of language arts, music, science, and nutrition. 
In addition, a committee of parents is responsible for operating our very successful after-school program, 
P.A.C.T. (Parents and Children Together), for our students in grades 1-5, and our Saturday morning program 
for our Kindergarteners, Kids 'n Company. Members of the Shawsheen School Executive Board include: Dana 
Gray, President; Janet Cahill, Vice President; Ann Sheehan, Treasurer; Joan Gillespie, Secretary; 
Denise Trueira, Publicity; Jane Nitchie, Sunshine. 

The Shawsheen School Student Council serves as an advisory board to the principal and assistant principal. 
They encourage their peers to cooperate in the day-to-day responsibilities of being part of a school 
community, assist in the flow of students before school, and work cooperatively on specific problems. In 
addition, the Student Council is committed to working on communi ty-OOlated projects such as their holiday 
food drive to benefit the homeless sheltered at the House of Hope in Lowell, their used book drive to 
benefit children with AIDS, and their environmental awareness project to help beautify Kidsplace. We are 
very proud of the girls and boys who serve on the council: Billy Holloway, President; Lee Trimarchi, Vice 
President; Greg Anderson, Secretary; Brian Tresher, Treasurer; Fifth Grade Representatives: Jason Brigham, 
Julie Gillis, Jacob Gronemeyer, Matthew Hardy, Tracy Melzar, and Kevin Tildsley; and Fourth Grade 
Representatives: Lynn Adley, Alex Athanassiou, Ben DeGennaro, Timmy Gillis, Richard Marquis, Charles Rice, 
Rebecca Rogers, Laurence Senesi and Julie Yentile. 

Because they believe learning is an ongoing process, the Shawsheen School teachers have taken an active role 
in the inservice workshops sponsored by the Professional Development Cotnmittee comprised of administrators 
and teachers. Examples of workshops in which teachers participated include: Children of Divorce, Children 
from Chemically Dependent Families, Curriculum Sharing, Integrating the Writing Process and Computers, Math 
Their Way, Science Education, Stock market, Newsgame, Original Curriculum Design and Positive Discipline. 



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WOBURN STREET SCHOOL 
Dolores Silva, Principal 
Richard OeRosas, Assistant Principal 

The World Book Partners in Excellence program which is a Read-A-Thon activity turned out to be an idea whose 
time had come for the Woburn Street School. Students read a total of 2,200 books in a seven week period. 
They turned in sponsor money totalling $5,219.25. When World Book added $2,609.62 to the sum, the school 
was able to purchase 22 sets of encyclopedias for the classrooms with the funds. Participating students 
received certificates and medals at a special awards ceremony. The larger goal of fostering a love of 
independent reading exceeded the school's expectations. 

Mrs. Marie Shack's art students in the fifth grade of the Woburn Street School experienced the fun of making 
four- legged creatures out of clay. Most students chose to do dinosaurs but some made turtles, panda bears 
and alligators. 

Miss Susan Hendee wanted to enhance the physical well being of the boys and girls at the school so she 
formed a "Jump Rope Club". Students participate during their lunch recess. Miss Hendee has currently 250 
youngsters spread through grades 1-5 involved in the club. Developing cardiovascular endurance and 
coordination in Miss Hendee's ultimate goal. 

SCHOOL FOODSERVICE DEPARTMENT 
Anne M. Quinn, Director 

The Wilmington School Foodservice Department has been very active and busy this year. Along with serving 
approximately 300,000 student meals and 17,000 Senior Citizen lunches, we have been catering many 
activities. Our services have been called on to prepare, serve or supervise the National Honor Society 
Banquet, Athletic Department Awards Dinner, PAC Spaghetti Suppers and Breakfasts, and many Coffee Hours and 
Meetings. 

The U.S.D.A. used Wilmington as a pilot study for its new review system for accountability for all School 
Lunch Programs nationwide. 

The staff has had an opportunity to participate in training programs presented by Massachusetts School 
Foodservice Association and the Bureau of School Nutrition Services, Department of Education. 

We are hoping for increased student lunch participation. As a self-supporting department it is extremely 
difficult in this era of rising prices to continue to be self-supporting. We are being careful with food 
and supplies to conserve as much as possible. 

We have implemented as many suggestions as possible and continue to seek out new ideas and possibilities to 
improve Food Service and always have an up-beat, current program for the students and other participants. 

READING/LANGUAGE ARTS DEPARTMENT 
Brenda Horan, Director 

The Chapter I Reading Parent Advisory Council held three general meetings. An informational meeting was 
I held in the Fall. The annual "Make and Take" winter workshop proved again to be a success. The Spring 
I meeting was a presentation of student work completed throughout the year. Stories and poems written by the 
students as well as a play were shared. The Newspaper Committee published three newsletters which contained 
children's work and informational articles for parents. The PAC officers for the 1988-1989 year were: 

Frances Przyjemski, Chairperson 

Linda Power, Vice Chairperson 

Patricia Parker, Secretary 

Sharyn Develin, Comptroller 

Patricia Fenton, Newsletter Chairperson 

The Reading/Language Arts Activities Newsletter was distributed monthly to all students in grades K-5. Many 
ideas and activities for parents to use in helping their children at home were given. 

The Eighth Annual Summer Reading Program , which is a cooperative effort between the Wilmington Memorial 
Library under the supervision of Mrs. Sara Rueter, and the Wilmington Reading Department was held. The 
major objectives of this program were to encourage summer reading and visits to the public library, the 
theme for the Eight Annual Summer Reading Program was Mystery Summer. A kit consisting of a folder for 
logging in library visits and books read during the summer was given to each child who attended. Special 
activities were held throughout the summer. 



-75- 



In September, certificates of participation were presented in each elementary school. The library reported 
extremely high circulation of books during the summer. Wilmington students are discovering the rewards of 
reading while on vacation. 

PERFORMING AND FINE ARTS DEPARTMENT ^ 
Lorraine M. Kalil, Director | 

Highlights of a successful year in the Performing and Fine Arts department were two new pilot programs. " 

Music was introduces in early childhood classes at the High School. The program focuses on two main 
themes: singing and the instruments of the orchestra. The songs chosen reflect positive individual 
feelings and strong values such as sharing, family, cooperation, and concepts such as numbers and the 
alphabet. The instruments are presented as characters with distinct personalities and are sometimes 
featured in predicaments which the students help solve. 

Drama made inroads in each of the elementary schools through a creative theatre program, the program is 
conducted for third, fourth, and fifth grade classes. At the Shawsheen and Uoburn Street Schools, each 
group is scheduled for two terms in a program concentrating on theatre games and exercises. At the Wildwood 
School, the program is of a year's duration during which the third grade classes augment classroom 
curriculum by incorporating creative dramatics into the study units. The program in grades four and five is 
independent of the classroom and will culminate in a mini drama festival with each class presenting a short 
play complete with costumes, sets, make-up and props. 



These programs have been successful and very well received. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS DEPARTMENT 
James M. Gillis, Director 



The Physical Education Department continued to serve all students (K-12), as well as providing an adaptive 
program for students with special needs. The program sponsors a physical education "Mile Club" to encourage 
physical fitness in Grades 5 through 8. 

The Health program in Grades K-5, under the direction of Mrs. Laura Stinson, has incorporated "Project 
Charlie" into the curriculum. In Grade 5 we offer the DARE program in cooperation with the Wilmington 
Police Department and Officer Robert Spencer. These programs emphasize the importance of drug/alcohol 
education through the teaching of self-esteem, responsibi Ity and decision making. 

The Physical Education Department cited several students for outstanding achievement in physical education: 

1989 Jennifer DelNinno Jeffrey Botte 

1990 Andrea Ducey John Ings 

1991 Kristina Przyjemski Adrien Grise' 

1992 Jennifer Caira Derek Stokes 



Athletic Awards - 1989 



Dr. Gerald Fagan Award - "To the Outstanding Athlete" 
Danielle Fay (Plymouth State College) 
Steve Murray 



Lawrence H. Gushing Award - "To The Senior Athlete Demonstrating Both Scholarship and Sportsmanship" 
Karen Lynch (Boston College) 
Joseph Spencer (U. of Lowell) 

Harold "Ding" Driscoll Award - "To The Senior With the Most Dedication to Sports" 
Jennifer O'Donnell (Providence College) 
Doug Michaud (Southeaster Mass. U) 

George Spanos Awared - "For Contribution And Service to W.H.S. Athletics" 
Mrs. Sally Radomski, President Boosters Club 

Alumni Award - Recognized former outstanding student-athletics who have gone on to college and continued to 
demonstrate their commitment to excellence . 
Janet Crowley - Class of '85 



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Top "10" Awards - Senior athletes who academically finish in the Top "10" of his/her class. 
Rank 



1 Noel Bouchie (Boston College) 

2 Matthew Ouellette (Providence College) 

3 Heather Day (U. Mass. Amherst) 

5 Kristin Palm (U. of Vermont) 

6 Jill Martyn (Amherst College) 

7 Deborah Gigante (Villanova University) 
9 David MacMullin (Worcester Poly Tech) 

10 Karen Lynch (Boston College) 



NVC All-Conference Awards: 

Gina Martiniello (field hockey) 

Ann Marie Andersen (field hockey) 

Andy Parr (soccer) 

Brian Gillespie (soccer) 

Erin McKenna (soccer 

Tracey Greer (gymnastics) 

Greg Catanzano (football) 

Scott Tuxbury (football) 

Ed Harrison (Coach of the Year) 

Gina Martiniello was selected by the Boston Herald for the girls field hockey "All Scholast ic- Fi rst Team" 
Award. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 
Cleo N. Fredette, Jr., Director 

During the last calendar year the Special Education Department worked closely with the High School 
Principal, the SEEM collaborative and the Occupational Education Department at Wilmington High School to 
I plan, develop and implement two Early Childhood Programs at Wilmington High School. The above parties 
1 worked cooperatively in the preparation of a joint high school and special education department proposal for 
I the development of two early childhood programs located at WHS. After a coordinated presentation to the 
school committee in the Spring of 1989 and a subsequent approval by the school committee, the special 
education department worked closely with high school personnel, SEEM Collaborative personnel and State 
Department of Education staff to implement the proposal. 

In September of '89 WHS opened with two innovative early Childhood Programs in operation. The first program 
is a SEEM Collaborative/Special Education Program. It services approximately 12 special needs students, 
most of whom are Wilmington residents. One student is from North Reading. This program operates two half 

I day sessions and also includes speech, physical and occupational therapy services. The second program is an 
integrated early childhood program which is comprised of young children with and without special needs. 

I This program operates on a four day a week basis. A Federal early Childhood Special Education Grant was 
written by the department to assist the town in funding this new program. 

An integral part of both pre-school programs is the fact that Wilmington High School's Child Development 
Program works closely with the staff and students of both pre-school classes. Wilmington High School 
students enrolled in the Child Development Program assist the teachers on a daily basis with the education 
and care of the preschoolers. This cooperative effort is providing meaningful and practical experience for 
the students interested in careers in early Childhood Education, Special Education and child care related 
fields. 

PERSONNEL 

The Wilmington School community wishes the following teachers who have retired from the Wilmington Public 
Schools this year many happy and healthful years. They include: 

Mary Dr iscol I -Roy, Principal, North Intermediate School 
Mary Thiel, Business Education, Wilmington high School 
Marjorie Whelan, Elementary, Woburn Street School 



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WILMINGTON SCHOOL COMMITTEE 1989 



Mr. Robert E. Surran, Chairman 
Dr. Shirley F. Callan, Vice Chairman 
Mrs. Andrea M. Paglia, Secretary 



Mr. Aldo Caira, Sr. 
Dr. James A. Demos 
Mr. John J. DeMarco 
Mr. Bradford Jackson 



The Wilmington School Committee wishes to thank the following former members of the School Committee who 
concluded their terms in office this past year: 



In conclusion, we would like to take this opportunity to extend our appreciation to the administrators, 
teachers, parents, and students who contributed their efforts to the Wilmington Public Schools during the 
1989 school year. A special note of thanks to the many town departments that cooperated with the school 
system in 1989. 



Elected representatives of the Regional School Committee are: Anthony R. Mazzone and Mark Trifiro from 
Bedford; Kenneth L. Buffum, Chairman, and Bernard Hoar, Secretary, from Billerica; John P. Miller and 
Alfred Verrier from Burlington; Richard E. Griffin and J. Peter Downing from Tewksbury; and Kevin J. 
Sowyrda, Vice Chairman, and John Gil I is. Treasurer, from Wilmington. 

Sandra McNeal, School Committee member from Burlington, graciously served until May of 1989 filling a 
vacancy which occurred in the fall of 1988 when Francis McLaughlin resigned. Mrs. McNeal was replaced by 
Mr. Verrier in Burlington's Annual Town Election. The District gratefully appreciates the significant 
contribution exhibited by Mrs. McNeal. 

As one of twenty-five regional vocational technical school districts in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Shawsheen Valley Technical continued to offer comprehensive vocational/technical opportunities for 
approximately twelve hundred high school students from Bedford, Burlington, Billerica, Tewksbury and 
Wi Imi ngton. 

Upon graduation, students acquire both a comprehensive academic high school diploma and certification in 
their chosen vocational/technical discipline. In June of 1989, two hundred and ninety-four students 
graduated from Shawsheen Technical, with over ninety-eight percent either acquiring jobs within their 
skilled professions of pursuing higher education. These placement statistics are consistent with the past 
performance of Shawsheen's sixteen graduating classes and are amongst the highest placement statistics for 
all school systems throughout the Commonwealth. 

Many activities took place during 1989 which deserve special recognition: 



In January of 1989, member communities supported a two million seven hundred thousand 
dollar bond issue to both upgrade the school facility and purchase state of the art 
educational equipment. A design contractor was selected to implement a renovation 
schedule, and plans and specifications for improvements were developed and advertised 
during the year. Total project completion is expected during the summer of 1990. 

The School District continued to comply with accreditation recommendations from the 
New England Association of Schools and Colleges. Since receiving accreditation in 
1988, the district has implemented ninety-eight percent of the Association's 
recommendat i ons . 

The Superintendent/Director, Charles Lyons, served on the Commonwealth's Secretary of 
Administration and Finance's Local Aid Task Force representing the interests of 
vocational technical school districts. 



Dr. Michael J. Thomas 
Mr. Anthony Accardi, Jr 
Mrs. Bridget T. Zukas 




Vocational Technical School 



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* All collective bargaining agreements were re-negotiated during the year. Three year 
contract settlements were reached with administrators, teachers, secretaries and 
cafeteria workers. 

* In cooperation with Town Managers from Tewksbury and Wilmington, the School District 
initiated plans to group purchase health insurance beginning in July of 1990. 

* The District initiated new adult training programs in Health Technology and Diesel 
Mechanics. Both programs were completely funded through receipt of state and federal 
grants. The district continued to receive a grant from the Bay State Skills 
Corporation, using it to train underemployed adults in electronics in cooperation 
with area businesses. 

* The District received both state and federal grants to: complete its Basic Skills 
Computer Laboratory; provide a vocational skill exploratory and academic enrichment 
program during the summer months for one hundred students from member communities; 
initiate an after-school enrichment program for junior high school youngsters to 
begin in January of 1990. The District also received financial assistance from the 
Massachusetts Electric Company to reduce energy use by installing energy efficient 

I ighting. 

* The District completed construction of a home on Carolina Road in Tewksbury, and 
initiated an affordable house building project on Everett Avenue in Wilmington in 
cooperation with the Town of Wilmington. 

* In cooperation with the Middlesex County Sheriff's department, fifty percent of the 
classrooms throughout the school were painted by inmates from the BiUerica House of 
Correction during August of 1989. Additional cooperative work related improvements 
are planned for the future. 

The aforementioned highlights are documented as a snapshot of the dynamic modifications in both planning 
and imagination offered member communities by the imaginative staff employed at Shawsheen Valley 
Technical. Viewed by state wide educators as one of the most experienced professional staff assembled 
in Massachusetts, one hundred and fifty educators at Shawsheen Valley Technical continue to dedicate 
their combined efforts to adequately prepare area youth for future employment. 

With the assistance of over three hundred area businessmen who serve on our Craft Advisory Committee 
overseeing each technical/vocational training program, graduates continue to receive four job offers for 
each graduate who fulfills the curriculum requirements. 

Residents are urged to contact the school's Guidance Department at (508) 667-2111 for additional 
information regarding the various programs offered to area residents. 

The continued success of our offerings is a direct result of the support received from our communities, 
its leaders, and its citizens. We appreciate their combined support. 



79 



Town Meetings 



WARRANT ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION - APRIL 15, 1989 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: THE CONSTABLES OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 

Greetings: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By-Lawsi 
of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to votej 
in Town affairs to meet and assemble at Town Hall Auditorium, (Precincts 1, 2, and 5) and the Uildwoodj 
School (Precincts 3, 4, and 6), N.B., Saturday the fifteenth day of April, A.D. 1989 at 9:45 o'clock ir^ 
the forenoon, the polls to be opened at 10:00 a.m. and shall be closed at 8:00 p.m. for the election of| 
Town Offices: 

ARTICLE 1. To bring in your votes on one ballot respectively for the following named offices, to wit: 
Two Selectmen for the term of three years. Three Members of the School Committee for the term of three 
years; One Member of the Regional Vocational School District Committee for the term of three years; 
One Member of the Housing Authority for the term of Five Years; One Member of the Redevelopment 
Authority for the term of five years; One Non-binding question regarding the public safety and 
rebuilding of the bridge in Wilmington Center at the intersection of Routes 62 and 129. 

You are also hereby further required and directed to notify and warn the said inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington who are qualified to vote on elections and Town affairs therein to assemble subsequently and 
meet in the Town Meeting at the High School Gymnasium, Church Street, in said Town of Wilmington, on 
Saturday the Twenty-second day of April, A.D. 1989 at 1:30 p.m., then and there to act on the followingi 
articles: 

In accordance with the above Warrant, the meeting was called to order by the Moderator Michael A. Caira, 
at 9:45 A.M. at the Town Hall and as much of the Warrant as is noted above was read. Upon the motion of 
Eleanor Doyle, it was moved and seconded and so voted to dispense with further reading of the Warrant. 

All voting machines were opened and the Zero sheets were posted so that the condidates could examine 
them before the polls were opened. The checkers were prepared with their voting lists and voter 
identification cards and everything was in readiness at 10:00 A.M. 



SELECTMEN - Three years (Vote for two ) 

Daniel H. Ballou, Jr., 194 Woburn Street 1284 

Elected Robert L. Doucette, 20 Palmer Way 1436 

Elected Chester A. Bruce, Jr, 317 Salem Street 1349 

Blanks 795 

4864 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE - Three years (Vote for three) 

Elected Aldo A. Caira, Sr., 188 Chestnut Street 1603 

Elected John J. DeMarco, 8 Kenwood Avenue 1365 

James Harvey Doucette, 13 Philips Avenue 512 

Philip A. Fenton, Sr., 69 Butters Row 899 

Paul E. Martell, 24 Clark Street 540 

Elected Andrea M. Paglia, 6 Bond Street 900 

Blanks 1477 

7296 

SHAWSHEEN VALLEY REGIONAL VOCATIONAL/TECHNICAL SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMITTEE Three years (Vote for one ) 

Elected John M. Gil I is, 195 Burlington Avenue 1755 

Blanks 677 

2432 

WILMINGTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY - Five years - Vote for one 

Elected Carl A. Backman, Jr., 11 Lawrence Street 1634 

Blanks 798 

2432 

QUESTION #1 TOWN CENTER 

1) Do you support bridge replacement, traffic improvement and center revi tal i zat ion? 1454 

2) Do you support bridge replacement only? 522 

3) Do you support no action in the Town Center? 267 
Blanks ^89 



Choice #1 winning with 1454 votes. 



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(Town Election cont'd) 



At 8:00 p.m. the polls were declared closed and the Town Clerk read the results of this election at 
10:00 p.m. and all elected officials were sworn to the faithful performance of their duties with the 
exception of Carl A. Backman, Jr. The total number of votes cast were two thousand three hundred 
sixty-one (2,361) and seventy-one (71) absentees for a total of two thousand four hundred thirty-two 
(2,432), which is 23. 6X of the 10,291 total registered voters. 



Prisci I la R. Ward 
Town Clerk, Wi Imington 



WARRANT ANNUAL TOWN MEETING AND SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON - APRIL 22. 1989 



TO: THE CONSTABLES OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON, 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By-Laws 
of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the Inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote 
in Town affairs to meet and assemble at the High School Gymnasium, Church Street, on Saturday the 
twenty-second day of April, 1989, at 1:30 p.m., then and there to act on the following articles: 

A quorum being present at 1:40 P.M. the Moderator introduced the High School Jazz Band and the Shown 
choir members who played and sang prior to the opening. They then played the National Anthem after the 
pledge of allegiance to the flag. Reverand Stotts of the Methodist Church gave the invocation after 
which the Moderator asked for a moment of silent prayer for the departed members who passed on this year 
and the victims of the Iowa who died or were injured this past week. He explained the process of the 
Open Town Meeting, explaining the rules governing same, and then announced he would start with Special 
Town Meeting, going immediately thereafter into the Annual. He then introduced the newly elected 
officials and recognized and thanked those who served before. 

Motion by James C. Stewart, "I move that the Moderator dispense with further reading of the warrant and 
take up and make reference to each article by number." Motion was seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 1: (drawn as #4) To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate by taxation or transfer 
from available funds a sum or sums of money for the operation of various Town Departments and expenses; 
or do anything in relation thereto: Finance Committee recommends approval. 

DPW - Street Light Account to Household Hazardous Waste 

Insurance & Bonds Workmens' Compensation to Police Dept. - Fill-In Account 
Insurance & Bonds Workmens' Compensation to Poice Dept. - Night Shift Differential 

ARTICLE 1(a): Motion by Reginald Stapczynski, "I move that the Town vote to transfer the sum of $30,000 
in the FY-1989 budget to the DPW -Household Hazardous Waste Account from the DPW - Street Light 
Account. Seconded and unanimously so voted. 

ARTICLE Kb): "I move that the Town vote to transfer the sum of $12,000 in the FY-1989 budget to the 
Police Department Fill-In Costs Account from the Insurance and Bonds - Workers Compensation Account. 
Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 1(c): 

"I move that the Town vote to transfer the sum of $6,200 in the FY-1989 budget to the Police Department 
-Night Shift Differential Account from the Insurance and Bonds - Workers' Compensation Account. Motion 
seconded and so voted 

ARTICLE 2: (drawn as #3) To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning by-law and zoning map of 
Wilmington Map 10 Parcel 2 by voting to rezone from Residential 60 (R60) district to Residential 20 
(R20) the following described parcel of land: 

On a plan entitled "Plan of land in Wilmington, MA" dated July 19, 1922 C.B. Humphrey, surveyor for 
Court recorded with Middlesex North Registry District Land Court Book 1127 Page 385, 4993 and described 
as follows: 

Northerly by Hopkins Street, one hundred eighty nine and 86/100 (189.86) feet; 

Northeasterly by land now or formerly of Joseph H. Crispo, one hundred forty three 55/100 (143.55) feet; 
Southeasterly by land now or formerly of Elmer B. Chase, three hundred ninety-four 40/100 (394.40) feet; 
Westerly by lot B, four hundred thirty nine 22/100 (439.22) feet. 

subject to a right of way along the westerly boundary of the granted premises as shown on a "Plan of 
land in Wilmington, MA" and Billerica dated July 19, 1922 certificate 1888 said Parcel 42 on the town of 
Wilmington Assessors Map 10 and containing 1.49 acres; or do anything in relation thereto. Finance 
Committee and Planning Board recommends disapproval. 



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(Article 2 cont'd) 



Motion by James Castellano, "1 move that the town vote to rezone the above mentioned parcel of land from 
Residence 60 (R-60) District to Residence 20 (R-20) District the discription being the same as in the 
main article." After much discussion the voted was taken. 2/3rds vote is required. Motion seconded 
and so voted. Yes 330 and No 8. 

ARTICLE 3: (drawn last): To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to make an 
exception to the moratorium and to sell and convey to Mr Jay P. Harrison a certain parcel of Town-owned 
land with the residential structure, foreclosed by the Town for non-payment of taxes, shown as Parcel 3 
on Assessor's Map 10 bound and described as follows: 

"Beginning at a point in the southerly side of Hopkins Street at its intersection with the right of 
way known as Arlington Street; thence bearing easterly by said Hopkins Street, 125.00 feet to Parcel 2 
on Assessor's Map 10; thence bearing southerly, A39.22 feet along property line of Parcel 2 on 
Assessor's Map 10 and said Town-owned land; thence bearing westerly, 125.43 feet to a point marked by 
a stake; thence bearing northerly, 330.47 feet along property line of Parcel 5 on Assessor's Map 10, 
and continuing 138.00 feet along said Arlington Street to the point of the beginning, containing 1.24 
+/- acres; 

subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine, and further to set the minimum 
amount to be paid for such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Jay Harrison was the same as the main article. The Moderator ruled the article OUT OF ORDER 
as it conflicted as stated in the main article with the moratorium on the sale of town owned land. No 
action was taken. 

ARTICLE 4: (Acted on 1st prior to Article 5 drawn 1st): To see if the Town will vote to amend Chapter 
3, Section 16 of the By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised, by adding the 
following pertaining to the moratorium on sale of Town-owned land as voted at the Special Town Meeting 
of April 27, 1985: 

"Notwithstanding the above moratorium, the Selectmen may grant utility easements to provide 
utility services, with the approval of the Town Meeting, subject to all applicable law" or 
anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert Cain, "I move that the town vote to amend Chapter 3, Section 16, of the By-Laws of the 
Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised, by adding the following pertaining to the moratorium on 
sale of Town-owned land as voted at the Special Town Meeting of April 27, 1985". The Moderator 
interrupted him and asked if the motion read the same as the main article and it did. Motion was 
seconded. Finance Committee recommended approval. Voted unanimously. So voted. 

ARTICLE 5: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to grant easements, as more 
particularly described below, to the Tennessee Gas Pipeline Co. for the purpose of natural gas 
transmission on such terms and conditions as the Selectmen shall determine are in the best interest of 
the Town. 

(a) An easement to lay, construct, maintain, operate, alter, repair, change the size of, remove and 
replace a 24 inch pipeline as shown on Tennessee Gas Pipeline Co. drawing "TB-L12-E270C- 100-40" crossing 
property owned by the Town of Wilmington by instrument recorded in the North Middlesex District Registry 
of Deeds, Book 1387, Page 94, shown as Parcel 8 on Assessors Map 27. 

(b) An easement to lay, construct, maintain, operate, alter, repair, change the size of, remove and 
replace a 24 inch pipeline as shown on Tennessee Gas Pipeline Co. drawing "TB-L12-E2702-100-50.04" 
crossing property owned by the Town of Wilmington by instrument recorded in the North Middlesex Registry 
of Deeds, Book 1794, Page 139, shown as Parcel 5 on Assessors Map 49. 

(c) An easement to lay, construct, maintain, operate, alter, repair, change the size of, remove and 
replace a 24 inch pipeline as shown on Tennessee Gas Pipeline Co. drawing "TB-L12-E270C- 100-50. 16" 
crossing property owned by the Town of Wilmington by instrument recorded in the North Middlesex District 
Registy of Deeds, Book 1205, Page 34, shown as parcel 45 on Assessors Map 49 or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

Motion by Robert Cain, "I move that the town voted to authorize the Board of Selectmen to grant 
easements," he was interrupted as the motion was the same as the main article. Motion seconded. 
Finance Committee recommended approval. Mason Taber, a representative from the Tennessee Gas Pipeline 
Co. spoke for the article about the need for the three easements. Motion was voted unanimously. So 
voted. 



-82 



ARTICLE 6: (drawn #2) To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to grant an 
easement to the Town of Reading Municipal Light Department to construct, repair, erect and maintain the 
lines, poles, wires and supporting fixtures for the transmission of electricity, upon, under, across or 
over property owned by the Town of Wilmington by instrument recorded with Middlesex North District 
Deeds, Book 1786, Page 580, shown on Assessors Plans as Parcel 65, Sheet 34 or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

Motion by Robert Cain, "I move that the town voted to authorize the Board of Selectmen to grant an 
easement to the Town of Reading, reading the same as above". Motion seconded. Finance Committee 
recommends approval. Motion unanimously so voted. 



WARRANT ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22. 1989 



With a motion made and seconded to adjourn the Special Town Meeting, the Moderator continued with the 
reading of the Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting at 2:25 P.M. 

As the Moderator read the warrant he was interrupted by Robert J. Cain, Motion: "I move that the 
Moderator dispense with further reading of the warrant and take up and make reference to each article by 
number. Motion seconded and so voted 

ARTICLE 2: To hear reports of Committees and act thereon. Motion by Reginald S. Stapczynski, "I move 
that the Town vote to hear a report from the Strategic Management Committee entitled the Wilmington 
Strategic Management Plan - 1989. Motion was seconded. The Town Manager explained the project and the 
work already put into it. 

ARTICLE 3: To see of the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of 
paying unpaid bills of previous years; or do anything in relation thereto. Motion by James Stewart, "I 
move to pass over this article." Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 4: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year 
beginning July 1, 1989, in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to 
issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any notes therefor, payable within 
one year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in 
accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17; or do anything in relation thereto. Motion by 
James Stewart, "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year 
beginning July 1, 1989, in accordance with provisions of the General Laws, Chapter 44, Secion 4, and to 
issue a note or notes therefor, payable with one year, and to renew any notes therefor, payable within 
one year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in 
accordance with the General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. Motion seconded. Finance Committee 
recommends approval. Motion so voted. 

ARTICLE 5: To see how much money the Town will appropriate for the expenses of the Town and the 
salaries of several Town Officers and Departments and determine how the same shall be raised, whether by 
taxation, transfer from available funds, or otherwise; or do anything in relation thereto. Motion 
James Carroll "I move that the several and respective sums as recommended and presented by the Finance 
Committee be raised by taxation or by transfer from available funds and appropriated for the purpose set 
forth in Article #5, each item to be taken up and voted on in the order they appear, subject to 
amendment, and each item not be open for reconsideration until the entire budget is voted. Motion was 
seconded and so voted. 



-83- 



GENERAL GOVERMMENT 

Selectmen - Legislative 
Salaries ... 
Expenses ... 

Selectmen - Elections 
Salaries 

Expenses . . . . 



Registrar of Voters 
Salaries 
Expenses 



Finance Committee 
Salaries 
Expenses 



Town Manager 

Salary - Town Manager 
Other Salaries 
Expenses .... 



Town Accountant 

Salary - Town Accountant . 
Other Salaries .... 
Expenses 

Treasurer/Col lector 

Salary - Treasurer/Collector 
Other Salaries .... 

Expenses 

Tax Title Foreclosures. 



Town Clerk 

Salary - Town Clerk 
Other Salaries 
Expenses 



Board of Assessors 

Salary - Principal Assessor . 

Other Salaries 

Expenses 

Appraisals, EDP & Inventories 

Town Counsel 

Personal Services and Expenses 



Town Hall 

Salaries 
Expenses 



Permanent Building Committee 

Salary 

Expenses 

TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT . . . 



3.200 
5.550 
8,750 

11,8A7 
5.251 
17,098 



6,350 
9.050 
15,400 



1,500 
3.850 
5,350 



67,864 
77,023 
1.100 
145,987 



38.734 
47,061 
2.270 
88.065 

43,572 
87,317 
10,560 
14.000 
155,449 



37,703 
27,712 
720 
66,135 



53,059 
47,557 
76,800 
4.000 
181,416 

50,000 



69,122 
43.700 
112,822 



3.000 
500 
3,500 
849,972 



-84- 



PROTECTION - PERSONS & PROPERTY 
Police Department 

Salary - Chief 55,778 

Deputy Chief 45,186 

Lieutenant 40,627 

Sergeants 254,723 

(Motion by Reginald Stapczynski, "I move that the appropriation under line item 

Police-Sergeants be amended from $219,395 to $254,723 for fiscal year 1990." 

Motion seconded so voted.) 

Patrolmen ..... 952,351 

I (Motion by James Stewart, "I move that the sum of $903,583 for fiscal year 1990 

be amended to $952,351 Motion seconded and so voted.) 

Clerks 46,743 

Fill- In-Cost 249,760 

Paid Holidays 55,250 

(Motion by Robert Doucette "I move that the appropriation under line item 
Police Dept.- Paid Holidays be amended from $52,000 to $55,250 for the fiscal 
year 1990". Motion seconded and voted). 

Specialists 8,820 

Night Shift Differential 25,796 

Incentive Pay 26,800 

Expenses 159,590 

(Motion by Robert Cain, "I move that the appropriation under line item Police Dept 

Expenses be amended be amended from $155,990 to $159,590 for the fiscal year 1990 

Motion seconded So voted 

D.A.R.E 4,000 

Capital Outlay 4.400 

1,929,824 

Fire 

Salary Chief 58,447 

Deputy Chief 80,601 

Lieutenants 168,166 

(Motion by Reginald Stapczynski, "I move that the sum appropriation under line item 

Fire Department Salaries - Lieutenants be amended from $136,447 to $168,166 

for fiscal year 1990." Motion seconded and so voted. 

Privates 807,655 

Dispatchers - Clerks 44,370 

Fill-In-Cost 127,326 

Paid Holidays 61,752 

(Motion by Robert Doucette, "I move that the appropriation under line item Fire 

Paid Holidays be amended from $60,352 to $61,752 for fiscal year 1990." Motion 

seconded and so voted.) 

EMT & Incentive Pay 58,200 

Overtime - Fire Alarm Maint 7,920 

Expenses 43.755 

1,458,192 

Emergency Management 

Salary 1,600 

Expenses 5,780 

Capital Outlay 4.125 

11,505 

Constable 

Salaries 100 

Animal Control 

Salary 19,080 

Expenses 9.545 

28,625 

Sealer of Weights & Measurers 

Salary 3,000 

Expenses 1 .000 

4,000 

TOTAL PROTECTION PERSONS & PROPERTY 3,432,246 



-85- 



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 
Planning Board 

salary 29.521 

Other Salaries (incl.P/T) 19,348 

Expense 3,448 

52,317 

Building Inspector/Board of Appeals 

Salary - Building Inspector 37,636 

Other Salaries (incl.P/T) 46,678 

Expenses 2.600 



Board of Health 

Salary - Director 37,637 

Other Salaries 65,050 

Hospital & Medical Care 500 

Expenses 7,300 

Mental Health 18,337 

Capital Outlay 350 

129,174 

Conservation Commission 

Salary - Administrator 29,655 

Other Salaries 13,458 

Expenses 3,756 

Conservation Fund 2.000 

48,869 

TOTAL COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 317,274 



PUBLIC WORKS 

Engineering Division 

Salaries 138,863 

(Motion by Chester Bruce, "I move that the appropriation under line item Public 
Works-Engineering Division-Salaries be amended from $82,008 to $138,863 for fiscal 
year 1990. Motion seconded and so voted Yes 200 No 141) 

Expenses 4.600 

143,463 

Highway Division 

Salary - Superintendent 58,447 

Other Salaries (44 weeks) 717,327 

(Motion by Chester Bruce, "I move that the appropriation under line item Public Works 
Highway Division - Other Salaries be amended from $669,529 to $717,327 for the 
fiscal year 1990.") Motion seconded and so voted 

Expenses 214,200 

Sidewalk Projects 

Road Machinery - Expenses 40,000 

Gasoline, Oil, Tires -DPW 29,650 

Gasoline, Oil, Tires -Other Depts 59,850 

Drainage Projects 20,000 

Public Street Lights 162,744 

Chapter 90 Construction 

(Motion by Neil Waisnor, "I move that the sum of $173,088 be appropriated for 
Highway Division - Chapter 90 Construction to be raised by transfer from 
Chapter 90 Construction - Highway Monies - Available Funds with zero to be raised 
by taxation." Motion seconded. So voted.) 

Chapter 90 Maintenance 55,000 

Chapter 81 Maintenance 85 .646 

1,442,864 

Snow & Ice Control 

Salaries (6 weeks plus 0/T) 205,038 

Expenses 206. 19 1 

411,229 

Rubbish Collection 

Expenses 1,112,444 

Tree Division 

Salaries ( incl .P/T,0/T) 81,215 

Expenses 30. 150 

111,365 

Parks & Grounds Division 

Salaries ( incl .P/T, 0/T 123,739 

Expenses 93!oOO 

216,739 



-86- 



Cemetery 

Salaries (Incl. P/T, 0/T) 65,971 

(Motion "I move that the sum of $100,77 be appropriated for the Cemetery Division 
Salaries Account; the sum of $16,800 to be raised by transfer from the sale of 
Cemetery Lots Account, and the sum of $18,000 to be raised by transfer from Interest 
Cemetery Trust Funds, and the balance of $65,971 to be raised by taxation" Motion seconded 
and voted.") 

Expenses 74. 158 

140,129 

TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 3,578,233 

MAINTENANCE OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

School Maintenance & Operations 

Salary - Superintendent 45,597 

Other Salaries 1,134,683 

(Motion by James Stewart, "I move that the appropriation under line item Maintenance 
of Public Buildings-School Maintenance Operations-Other Salaries be amended from 
$1,093,707 to $1,134,683 for fiscal year 1990. Motion seconded and so voted 

Expenses 154,000 

Expenses - Boiler Repair 70,000 

Expenses - Heating Fuel 210,000 

Roof Repairs 25,000 

Asbestos Study and Removal 20,000 

Capital Outlay 57.350 

1,716,630 

Town Building Maintenance 

Expenses 29,250 

Electricity 77,175 

Other Uti lities 83,000 

Capital Outlay 36.100 

225,525 

TOTAL MAINTENANCE OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS 1,942,155 

VETERANS' AID 

Veterans' Aid & Benefits 

Salary - Part-Time Agent 4,940 

Expenses 520 

Assistance - Veterans 10.000 

15,460 

LIBRARY 

Salary-Director 40,719 

Other Salaries 238,889 

Expenses 88.075 

367,683 

RECREATION 

Salary-Director 40,719 

Other Salaries (1 and P/T) 66,021 

Expenses 7.200 

113,940 

TOTAL LIBRARY & RECREATION 481,623 
MATURING DEBT & INTEREST 

Schools 1,145,860 

General Goverrunent 112,800 

Water 

(Motion by Neil Waisnor, "I move that the sum of $818,182 be appropriated for 

Maturing Debt and Interest - Water; to be raised by transfer from Water Dept. 

anticipated revenue with the balance of zero to be raised by taxation. Motion 

and so voted) 

Sewer 548,010 

Authentication Fees & Misc. Debt 193.607 

Total Maturing Debt and Interest 2,000,277 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Historical Commission 

Salaries 900 

Expenses 5,275 

Capital Outlay 650 

6,825 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

Salaries (includ. P/T) 56,689 

Expenses 34.000 

90,689 



-87- 



HANDICAPPED AFFAIRS COMMISSION 
Salaries .... 
Expenses .... 



800 
1.200 
2.000 



UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 

Insurance & Bonds 649,200 

Blue Cross-Blue Shield & Group Life 639,678 

(Motion by Neil Waisnor, ("I move that the sum of $1,199,792 be appropriated for the 
Blue Cross - Blue Shield and Group Insurance, the sum of $328,296 to be raised by 
transfer from Free Cash Funds and the balance from the Water Department - Anticipated 
Revenue with the balance of $638,678 to be raised by taxation. Motion seconded and 



so voted) 

Local Trans/Training Conference 15,000 

Reserve Funds 50,000 

Salary Adjustments & Additional Costs 365,842 

Sewer Maintenance 25,000 

Town Report 5,000 

Veterans' Retirement 32,500 

Employee Sick Leave Buy-Back 19,000 

Retirement - Unused Sick Leave 25,000 

Fitness Incentive Program 14,000 

Microf i Im Project 1 ,000 

Out-of -State-Travel 5,000 

Annual Audit 18,000 

Computer Maintenance/Expenses 35,200 

Hazardous Material Consulting 15,000 

M.W.R.A. Sewer Assessment 786,930 

Medicare Employer's Contribution 41,268 

Ambulance Billing 10.000 

TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 2,752,618 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

School Department 13,237,506 

(Motion by Robert Surran, "I move to amend Finance Committee recommendation of $12,605,326 
to the amount of $13,237,506 being the School Committee recommendation and that the town vote 
to appropriate the sum of $13,237,506 for the Wilmington School Dept. conditioned on a favorite 
override of Proposition 2 1/2 (MGL 59, Section 21) in the amount of $632,180; and in the absence 
of a favorable override, then the appropriation shall be $12,605,326 as recommended by the 

Finance 

Committee." Motion was seconded. He then introduced Mr. Fay, the new Supt. of Schools 

Vocational Training 21,600 

Regional Vocational School District 1 .089.803 

TOTAL SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 14,348,909 



STATUTORY CHARGES 

Current Years Overlay 600,000 

Prior Years Overlay Deficit 5,007 

Retirement Contributions 1,180,167 

County Government Tax 22,294 

MBTA (Ch.650 of 1965) 355,852 

Final Court Judgements 

Other Items 172 179 

TOTAL STATUTORY CHARGES 2,335,499 

ESTIMATED AVAILABLE FUNDS 

Local Receipts 4,546,254 

Local Aid 6,062*546 

Federal Revenue Sharing 3,000 

Estimated Free Cash 328^296 

Water Dept.- Avail. Funds 1,05o|oOO 

Sales of Cemetery Lots ! .' . ' 16|800 

Interest from Cemetery Trust Funds 18000 

Prior Year Over Estimate !!!!!! 9^000 

Chapter 90 Construction-Avail. Funds [ [ 173088 

Sale of Real Estate ' 

Insurance Reimbursement 19 088 



TOTAL ESTIMATED AVAILABLE FUNDS 



-88- 



ARTICLE 6: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purchase of new 
and replacement capital equipment including but not limited to the following items, and further to 
authorize the the sale or turn-in, if any, and for the use of the several departments so designated; and 
to determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer, borrowing; to do anything in 
relation thereto: 
FISCAL YEAR 1990: 

a . Police Department 

1. Replacement of five (5) police cruisers 72,500 

b. Fire Department 

1. Replacement of ambulance 75,000 

c. D.P.U. - Highway Division 

1. Replacement of dump truck 35,250 

2. Replacement of compresser 8,995 

d. Treasurer/Col lector 

1. Purchase of personal computer 4,480 

e. Town Hall 

1. Purchase of a laster printer 4,248 

f . Aquifer Protection Study 

g. Fire Department 

1. Replacement of rescue trick 65,000 

h. D.P.W.-Snow & Ice Control 

I. Replacement of sidewalk plow 39,915 

i . Animal Control 

1. Construction of animal shelter 45,000 
or do anything in relation thereto: 

Motion by Reginald Stapczynski, "I move that the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $350,388 for the 
purchase or construction of the several items of capital expenditures listed below; to be raised from FY 
1989 appropriation balances ($200,000 from DPW - Snow and Ice , $125,000 from Electric Dept. Study, 
$10,000 Animal Control Expenses, and $15,388 from the MBTA Salem Street Land Taking Account); and to 
authorize the sale or turn-in of the several items so designated. Motion seconded. All appropriated 
monies to come from transfer. $350,388 voted transferred from FY 1989 

ARTICLE 7: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purchase of 
several items of new and replacement capital equipment for the School Department; or do anything in 
relation thereto. 



Fiscal Year 1990 



a . 


High School 










1. Various 


f urni ture 


and/or 


equi pment 


b. 


North Intermediate 


School 








1. Various 


f urni ture 


and/or 


equipment 


c. 


West Intermediate school 








1. Various 


f urni ture 


and/or 


equi pment 


d. 


Shawsheen School 










1. Various 


f urni ture 


and/or 


equipment 


e. 


Ui Idwood School 










1. Various 


furni ture 


and/or 


equipment 


f . 


Woburn Street School 








1. Various 


f urni ture 


and/or 


equipment 


9- 


Health Services 










1. Various 


furniture 


and/or 


equipment 



Motion by Robert Surran, "I move that the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $97,000 for the purchase 
of several items of new and replacement capital equipment consisting of various items of furniture, 
equipment and a mini -van to be allocated amongst the several public school buildings as approved by the 
School Committee, and further that the appropriation of $97,000 be raised as follows: the sum of $7,112 
be raised by transfer from the balance in the MBTA Salem Street land taking account and the sum of 
$89,888 be raised by taxation." Motion seconded and so voted. $7,112 transfer and $89,888 by taxation. 

ARTICLE 8: (drawn as #3) To see if the Town will vote to authorize its Treasurer/Collector to enter 
into a compensating balance agreement or agreements for Fiscal Year 1990 pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 
53F of the General Laws; or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Commitee recommends approval. 

Motion by Robert Cain, "I move that the Town vote to authorize its Treasurer/Collector to enter into a 
compensating balance agreement or agreements for Fiscal Year 1990 pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 53F of 
the General Laws." Motion seconded and so voted 



-89- 



ARTICLE 9: (drawn as #22) To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen or the Town 
Manager to apply for, accept, and enter into contracts from time to time for the expenditure of any 
funds without further appropriations allotted to Wilmington by the U.S. Federal Government under any 
Federal Grant Program and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts under any State Grant Program; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by James Stewart, "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectment, the Town 
Manager, or his agent, to apply for, accept, and enter into contracts from time to time for the 
expenditure of any funds, without further appropriations allotted to Wilmington by the U.S. Federal 
Government under any Federal Grant Program and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts under any State Grant 
Program. Motion seconded and so voted. Finance Committee recommends approval. 

ARTICLE 10: (drawn as #12) To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $8,000 for 
the Wilmington Council for the Arts; or do anything in relation thereto: 

Motion #1 by Elizabeth White, "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
$8,000 for the use of the Wilmington Council for the Arts for the maintenance of the Arts Center 
building (old Town Hall)." Motion seconded. Motion #2 by Neil Waisnor of Finance Committee, "I move 
the the appropriation for the Wilmington Council for the Arts be amended from $8,000 to $2,700 for new 
flooring and an air conditioner for FY-1990." Motion seconded. The floor recognized Anne Buzzell of 
the Arts Council and after her eloquent explaination of their needs and benefits to the town, motion #2 
by Mr. Waisnor lost. In fact he jokingly asked if the original $8,000 was enough. The original motion 
was then voted unanimously. So voted $8,000. 

ARTICLE 11: (drawn #17) To see if the Town will vote to amend Chapter 3, Section 16 of The By-Laws of 
the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised by amending the year "1989" so as to read "1990," and 
do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by James Stewart, "I move that the Town vote to amend Chapter 3, Section 16 of the By-Laws of the 
Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington revised by adding the following: 

"The moritorium provided for above be and hereby is extended until the Annual Town Meeting of April 
, 1990 in order to complete the inventory and evaluation of all Town-owned land. Motion seconded. 
Finance Committee recommends approval. So voted. 

ARTICLE 12: To see if the Town will vote to accept Chapter 640 of the Acts of 1985 "An Act Relative to 
the Granting or Renewing of Certain Licenses and Permits in Cities and Towns" and to amend The By-Laws 
of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised by adding the following new Section 39 to Chapter 5: 
SUSPENSION OF LOCAL LICENSES AND PERMITS 
SECTION 39: 

a) The Tax Collector or other municipal official responsible for records of all municipal taxes, 
assessments, betterments and other municipal charges, hereinafter referred to as the Tax 
Collector, shall annually furnish each department, board, commission or division, hereinafter 
referred to as the Licensing Authority, that issues licenses or permits including renewals and 
transfers, a list of any person, corporation, or business enterprise, hereinafter referred to 
as the Party, that has neglected or refused to pay any local taxes, fees, assessments, 
betterments or other municipal charges for not less than a twelve month period, and that such 
Party has not filed in good faith a pending application for an abatement of such tax or has a 
pending petition before the appellate tax board. 

(b) The Licensing Authority shall deny, revoke or suspend any license or permit, including renewals 
and transfers of any party whose name appears on said list furnished to the licensing from the 
Tax Collector; provided, however, that written notice is given to the Party and the Tax 
Collector, as required by applicable provisions of law, and the Party is given a hearing, to be 
held not earlier than fourteen days after said notice. Said list shall be prima face evidence 
for denial, revocation or suspension of said license or permit to any Party. The Tax Collector 
shall have the right to intervene in any hearing conducted with respect to such license denial, 
revocation or suspension. Any findings made by the Licensing Authority with respect to such 
license denial, revocation or suspension shall be made only for the purposes of such proceeding 
and shall not be relevant to or introduced in any other proceeding at law, except for any 
appeal from such license denial, revocation or suspension. Any license or permit denied, 
suspended or revoked under this section shall not be issued or renewed until the Licensing 
Authority receives a certificate issued by the Tax Collector that the Party is in good standing 
with respect to any and all local taxes, fees, assessments, betterments or other municipal 
charges payable to the municipality as of the date of issuance of said certificate. 



-90- 



(c) Any Party shall be given an opportunity to enter into a payment agreement with the Tax 
Collector, thereby allowing the Licensing Authority to issue a certificate indicating said 
limitations to the license or permit and the validity of said license shall be conditioned upon 
the satisfactory compliance with said agreement. Failure to comply with said agreement shall 
be grounds for the suspension or revocation of said license or permit; provided, however that 
the holder be given notice and a hearing as required by applicable provisions of law. 

(d) The Board of Selectmen may waive such denial, suspension or revocation if it finds there is no 
direct or indirect business interest by the property owner, its officers or stockholders, if 
any, or members of his immediate family, as defined in section one of chapter two hundred and 
sixty-eight A in the business or activity conducted in or on said property. 

This section shall not apply to the following licenses and permits granted under the General Laws of 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts: Open burning; section thirteen of chapter forty-eight; bicycle 
permits; section eleven A of Chapter eighty-five; sales of articles for charitable purposes; section 
thirty-three of chapter one hundred and one; children work permits; section sixty-nine of chapter 
one hundred and forty-nine; clubs, associations dispensing food or beverage license; section 
twenty-one E of chapter one hundred and forty; dog licenses; section one hundred and thirty-seven of 
chapter one hundred and forty; fishing, hunting, trapping licenses; section twelve of chapter one 
hundred and thirty-one; marriage licenses; section twenty-eight of chapter two hundred and seven; 
and theatrical events, public exhibition permits; section one hundred and eighty-one of chapter one 
hundred and forty, 
or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert Doucette, "I move that, motion reading the same as above warrant article. Motion 
seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 13: (drawn as #10) To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 245 of the 
Acts of 1988 which provides for the expenditure of funds to complete the work in an approved definitive 
subdivision as required by MGL Chapter 41, Section 81U; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert Cain, I move, the motion being the same as the above warrant article. Motion seconded 
and so voted. 

ARTICLE 14: To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money for the construction of sewers, 
sewerage systems and sewage treatment and disposal facilities in Main Street as shown on a plan on file 
in the office of the Town Engineer, and for the acquisition of interests in land whether by purchase, 
eminent domain or otherwise, and to authorize the assessment of betterments, all in accordance with 
Chapter 297 of the Acts of 1958 and all Acts in amendment and in addition thereto and other General or 
Special laws hereto enabling; to determine whether said funds shall be raised by taxation, transfer from 
available funds, or by borrowing under the provisions of Chapter 44, or by any combination thereof; and 
to authorize the Board of Water & Sewer Commissioners and/or the Board of Selectmen to apply for any 
federal and state Aid which may be available as contributions to be applied toward the cost of the 
project, and further to see if the Town will vote to rescind the action taken regarding Article 14 of 
the Special Town Meeting held on November 14, 1988, or to do anything in relation thereto. Petition by 
Water and Sewer Commission 

Motion by Arthur Smith, "I move that the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of $747,000 for the 
construction of sewers, sewerage systems and sewage treatment and disposal facilities in Main Street as 
shown on a plan on file in the office of the Town Engineer, and for the acquisition of interests in land 
whether by purchase, eminent domain or otherwise, and to authorize the assessment of betterments, all in 
accordance with Chapter 297 of the Acts of 1958 and all Acts in amendment and in addition thereto and 
other General or Special laws hereto enabling; to determine whether said funds shall be raised by 
taxation, transfer from available funds, or by borrowing under the provisions of Chapter 44, or by any 
combination thereof; and to authorize the Board of Water & Sewer Commissioners and/or the Board of 
Selectmen to apply for any federal and state Aid which may be available as contributions to be applied 
toward the cost of the project, and further to see if the Town will vote to rescind the action taken 
regarding Article 14 of the Special Town Meeting held on November 14, 1988, or to do anything in 
relation thereto. Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded. Standing vote was required 
as this is a bonding issue and 2/3rds vote is required. Yes 174 No 31. Motion so voted. Bonding 
$747,000 

ARTICLE 15: To see if the Town will accept as Town ways, the layout of the following described streets, 
as recommended by the Planning Board and approved by the Board of Selectemen (M.G.L. Ch. 82 as amended) 
and shown on Definitive Sub-Division plans approved in accordance with the "Rules and Regulations 
Governing the Sub-Division of Land in the Town of Wilmington, Massachusetts", and which plans are 
recorded at the Middlesex North Registy of Deeds (M.N.R.D.), copies of which are available in the office 
of the Town Engineer and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by right of eminent domain such 
land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect the purpose of this Article, 
and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised whether by taxation or by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or otherwise for the purpose of construction of said ways and for the payment of any 
damages from the takings of land and slope easements and other easements therefor: 



-91- 



(Article 15 cont'd): 

a. Blanchard Road , from Kendall Road, a distance of 625' more or less northerly to a dead end, as shown 
on definitive subdivision plan entitled Blanchard Road and recorded at the M.N.R.D. Plan Book No. U4 
and Plan No. 118 dated August 16, 1984. 

b. Great Neck Drive , from Woburn Street, a distance of 536' more or less southwesterly to a dead end, 
as shown on definitive subdivision plan entitled Great Neck Drive and recorded at the M.N.R.D. Plan Book 
No. U2 and Plan No. 128 dated May U, 1984. 

c. Palmer Uay . from Middlesex Avenue, a distance of 1437' more or less westerly thence northerly to a 
dead end, as shown on definitive subdivision plan entitled Middlesex Pines I and recorded at the 
M.N.R.D, Plan Book No. 142 and Plan No. 60 dated January 26, 1984. 

d. Douglas Avenue, from Palmer Way, a distance of 1017' more or less southerly thence westerly to a 
dead end, as shown on definitive subdivision plan entitled Middlesex Pines II and recorded at the 
M.N.R.D. Plan Book No. 144 and Plan No. 119 dated August 16, 1984. 

e. Fox Run Drive , from High Street, a distance of 975' more or less northerly thence westerly to a dead 
end. As shown on definitive subdivision plan entitled Fox Run Drive and recorded at the M.N.R.D. Plan 
Book No. 152 and Plan No. 84 dated March 4, 1986. 

f. Kaiin Way , from Woburn Street, a distance of 455' more or less southwesterly to a dead end, as shown 
on definitive subdivision plan entitled Sidel inker Farm and recorded at the M.N.R.D. Plan Book No. 153 
and Plan No. 85 dated May 13, 1986. 

g. Valyn Lane , from Salem Street, a distance of 608' more or less northeasterly to a dead end, as shown 
on definitive subdivision plan entitled Newell Estates and recorded at the M.N.R.D. Plan Book No. 143 
and Plan No. 65 & 71 dated October 9, 1987. 

h. Gloria Way , from Broad Street, a distance of 770' more or less southwesterly to a dead end, as shown 
on definitive subdivision plan entitled Gloria Way and recorded at the M.N.R.D. Plan Book No. 153 and 
Plan No. 97 dated May 16, 1986. 

i. Research Drive , from Ballardvale Street, a distance of 1817' more or less northeasterly to a dead 
end, as shown on definitive subdivision plan entitled Wilmington Technology Park and recorded at the 
M.N.R.D. Plan Book No. 156 and Plan No. 67 dated Ocotober 24, 1986. 

j. Tomahawk Drive , from Aldrich Road, a distance of 575' more or less northeasterly to a dead end, as 
shown on definitive subdivision plan entitled Tomahawk Drive and recorded at the M.N.R.D. Plan Book No. 
149 and Plan No. 8 dated July 16, 1985. 

k. Gearty Street , from Ring Avenue, a distance of 627' more or less northwesterly to Pilcher Drive, as 
shown on definitive subdivision plan entitled Corum Meadows and recorded at the M.N.R.D. Plan Book No. 
114 and Plan No. 56 dated April 26, 1972. 

I. Pilcher Drive , across the end of Gearty Street, a distance of 410' more or less, from the southerly 
property line of Lot 51 to the northerly property line of Lot 42, as shown on definitive subdivision 
plan entitled Corum Meadows and recorded at the M.N.R.D. Plan Book No. 114 and Plan No. 56 dated April 
26, 1972. 

or do anything in relation thereto. Article by Planning Board 

Motion by Reginald Stapczynski, "I move that the town vote to accept, reading the same as the above 
article with the addition of, "and vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $100 for the 
purpose of construction of said ways and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of 
land, slope, drainage or other easements therefor:". Motion seconded. Finance Committee recommends 
approval. Voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 16: (drawn as #14) To see if the Town will vote to transfer the following described parcel of 
land to the care, custody and control of the Selectmen, and further to authorize the Selectmen to 
transfer said property, or such portion as the Selectmen shall determine, to the Wilmington Housing 
Authority for the purpose of constructing affordable housing to be built in accordance with the 
Shawsheen Regional Vocational/Technical School house lottery program; a certain parcel of land acquired 
pursuant to the unanimous vote on Article 10 of the March 6, 1971 Annual Town Meeting, bounded and 
described as follows: 

Westerly by the State Highway, one hundred five and 16/100 (105.16) feet; 
Northwesterly by land now or formerly or Almar Realty Trust, Alexander V. 
Staniewicz, Trustee, one hundred thirty-five and 64/100 (135.64) feet; 
Northeasterly by lot 7, eighty-six (86) feet; 

Southeasterly by Williams Avenue, one hundred ninety-six and 12/100 
(196.12) feet. 



-92- 



(Article 16 cont'd); 

All of said boundaries are determined by the Land Court to be located as shown on plan 4312A, drawn by 
J. Lewis Carr, C.E., dated April 1913, as approved by the Court, filed in the Land Registration Office, 
a copy of a portion of which is filed with Certificate of Title 425, and said land is shown as Lots 1, 
2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 on said plan, and to authorize the Selectmen and/or the Town Manager to enter into an 
agreement with the aforementioned; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Rev. Michael Stotts, to pass over this article. Motion seconded and so voted to pass over. 

ARTICLE 17: (drawn as #31) To see if the Town will vote to transfer the following described parcel of 
land to the care, custody and control of the Selectmen, and further to authorize the Selectmen to 
transfer said property, or such portion as the Selectmen shall determine, to the non-profit affordable 
housing corporation for the purpose of constructing affordable housing; a certain parcel of land granted 
to the Town by Treasurer's Deed Document No. 21592, registered December 4, 1950 in Middlesex County 
North Registy District, bounded and described as follows: 

Southwesterly by Everett Avenue, one hundred (100) feet; 

Northwesterly by Lot 434, one hundred (100) feet; 

Northeasterly by Lots 438, 442 and 443 one hundred (100) feet; and 

Southeasterly by Lot 429, one hundred (100) feet. 

All of said boundaries are determined by the Land Court to be located as shown on subdivision plan 6036 
E, Sheet three (3), drawn by A. Millhouse, C.E., dated May 10, 1922, as approved by the Court, filed in 
the Land Registration Office, a copy of a portion of which is filed with Certificate of Title 1896, and 
said land is shown as Lots 430, 431, 432 and 433 on said plan, and to authorize the Selectmen and/or the 
Town Manager to enter into agreements with the af orment i oned; or do anything in relation thereto. 
Finance Committee and Planning Board recommends approval. 

Motion by James Stewart, "I move that the town vote," his motion being the same as the main article with 
the addition on the third line after the word corporation, the words ( AND/OR THE HOUSING AUTHORITY ), he 
dispensed with reading the full motion. Motion seconded and voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 18: (drawn as #7) To see if the vote to rescind the action taken on Article 16 of the Annual 
Town Meeting held on April 25, 1987, and to transfer the appropriation of $22,500 for the purpose of 
purchasing capital equipment described in Article 6; or do anything in relation thereto. Finance 
Committee recommends approval. 

Motion by Robert Cain, "I move that the town vote, the motion to read the same as the above motion". 
Motion seconded and so voted unanimously to transfer $22,500. 

ARTICLE 19: (drawn as #6 as meeting reconvened at 7:58 P.M.)) To see if the Town will vote to 
authorize the Selectmen and/or Town Manager to enter into a lease agreement with the First Baptist 
Church concerning a parcel of land located to the rear of the church property and contiguous with Town 
property for the purpose of enlarging the High School playing fields; or do anything in relation 
thereto. Finance Committe recommends approval. 

Motion by Chester Bruce, "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen and/or Town Manager to 
enter into a lease agreement, together with options for renewals, with the First Baptist Church 
concerning a parcel of land located to the rear of the church property and contiguous with Town property 
for the purpose of enlarging the High School playing fields." Motion second and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 20: (drawn as #30) To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen and/or Town Manager 
to request approval from the State Reclamation and Mosquito Control Board and following such approval, 
if granted, to take such action as may be necessary for the Town to join the Central Massachusetts 
Mosquito Control Project, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael McCoy, "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen and /or Town Manager to 
request approval from the State Reclamation and Mosquito Control Board and following such approval, if 
granted, to take such action as may be necessary for the Town to join the Central Massachusetts Mosquito 
Control Project. Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 21: (drawn as #26) To see if the Town will vote to accept as a gift the historical premises 
located at Glen Road and Middlesex Avenue known as the "Town Pound" and "Scalekeepers House" and to 
raise by appropriation a sum of money for recording expenses; or do anything in relation thereto. 
Finance Committee recommends approval 

Motion by Reginald Stapczynski, "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen to accept as a 
gift the historical premises in fee simple or an interest therein located at Glen Road and Middlesex 
Avenue known as the "Town Pound and Scalekeeper's House". Motion seconded. Historical Commission spoke 
of its historical interest to the town and stated it is one of only a few left in the Country. Motion 
voted unanimously. 



-93- 



ARTICLE 22: (drawn as #29) Conservation/Open Space Land Acquisition - Patches Pond To see if the town 
will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money, subject to an affirmative vote for debt exclusion, 
for the purpose of acquiring the following described parcel of land for Conservation purposes as 
described in G.L. Chapter 40, Section 8C, as amenmded, and to determine how said appropriation shall be 
raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise; and further to 
see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain, receive as a 
gift or execute an option for said purpose, a certain parcel of land being shown on Wilmington Tax 
Assessor's Map Number 29, Parcel Number 11-U, and further shown as Lot 22 on a Plan entitled "Bedell 
Estates", prepared by Robert E. Anderson, Inc., 178 Park Street, North Reading, Massachusetts, dated 
November 11, 1985, recorded at North Middlesex Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 159, Plan 128, on May 29, 
1987, said parcel being bound and described as follows: beginning at a point at the southeasterly 
corner of Lot 21, as shown on said plan, thence. 



24 


-00' 


-24"E 


170 


00 


feet. 


thence. 


43 


-30' 


-56"W 


210.39 


feet. 


thence. 


77 


-04 


-15"W 


325 


20 


feet. 


thence. 


54 


-24 


-20"W 


65 


18 


feet. 


thence. 


04 


-22 


-30"U 


74 


95 


feet. 


thence. 


81 


-43 


-41"E 


216.22 


feet. 


thence. 


52 


-01 


-00"E 


601 


50 


feet. 


thence. 


32 


-59 


-00"W 


473 


15 


feet. 


thence. 


73 


-34 


-46"E 


136 


77 


feet. 


thence. 


53 


-01 


-13"E 


240 


00 


feet. 


thence. 


36 


-35 


-47"E 


84 


67 


feet. 


thence. 


35 


-51 


-07"E 


1,919 


22 


feet. 


thence. 


74 


-51 


-27"U 


450 


00 


feet. 


thence. 



to a concrete bound, thence Northwesterly by various courses and distances the sum of 552.52 feet, 
thence along a curve with a radius of 1015.81 feet, a distance of 691.24 feet to an iron pipe, thence. 



S 23 -23'-18"W 179.24 feet, thence, 

S 25 -39'-20"W 100.00 feet, thence, 

S 24 -00'-24"W 145.03 feet, thence, 

N 54 -05'-42"U 36.00 feet, thence. 



along a curve with a radius of 425 feet, a distance of 5.16 feet to the point of beginning. Containing 
21.49 Acres, more or less, all as shown on the af orment i oned plan. 

The land so acquired shall be managed and controlled by the Wilmington Conservation Commission, and the 
Wilmington Conservation Commission be authorized to file on behalf of the Town any and all applications 
deemed necessary for grants and/or reimbursements from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts deemed 
necessary under the Self-Help Act (Chapter 132A, Section 11) and/or any others in any way connected with 
the scope of this Article, and the Town and the Conservation Commission be authorized to enter into all 
agreements and execute any and all instruments as may be necessary on behalf of the Town to effect said 
purchase, or do anything in relation thereto. Article by Conservation Commisssion Finance Committee 
recommends approval. 

Motion by Donald Ugolini, "I move that the town vote to appropriate the sum of $125,000 by borrowing, 
subject to an affirmative vote for debt exclusion, for the purpose of acquiring the following described 
parcel of land for Conservation purposes as described in G.L. Chapter 40, Section 8C, as amended; and 
further to see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain, 
receive as a gift or execute an option for said purpose, a certain parcel of land being shown on 
Wilmington Tax Assessor's Map Number 29, Parcel Number 11-U, and further shown as Lot 22 on a Plan 
entitled "Bedell Estates", prepared by Robert E. Anderson, Inc., 178 Park Street, North Reading, 
Massachusetts, dated November 11, 1985, recorded at North Middlesex Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 159, 
Plan 128, on May 29, 1987, said parcel being bound and described as follows: beginning at a point at 
the southeasterly corner of Lot 21, as shown on said plan, thence, the discription being the same as in 
the main article, see main article above. 

The land so acquired shall be managed and controlled by the Wilmington Conservation Commission, and the 
Wilmington Conservation Commission be authorized to file on behalf of the Town any and all applications 
deemed necessary for grants and/or reimbursements from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts deemed 
necessary under the Self-Help Act (Chapter 232A, Section 11) and/or any others in any way connected with 
the scope of this Article, and the Town and the Conservation Commission be authorized to enter into all 
agreements and execute any and all instruments as may be necessary on behalf of the Town to effect said 
purchase; and further to raise such appropriation the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow the sum of $125,000 under and pursuant to the provisions of 
MGL Chapter 44 and other applicable laws pertaining thereto, and to issue bonds and notes of the Town 
therefor. Article by Conservation Commission. Motion seconded and voted unanimously. So. voted. 
Bonding pending Prop. 2 1/2 over-ride. 



-94 



ARTICLE 23: (drawn as #11) To see if the Town will vote to create a non-profit affordable housing 
corporation pursuant to M.G.L. Chapter 180 and all amendments thereto, to provide affordable housing to 
the Town using town owned land and any other available funds for such purpose. The charter of said 
non-profit affordable housing corporation shall be as follows: 

SECTION 1. There is hereby established a nonprofit housing corporation to be known as the 
Wilmington Housing Assistance Board, Inc. which shall be subject to the supervision of the Board of 
Selectmen of the Town of Wilmington. Said board shall consist of not less than five members, who shall 
be appointed by the Board of Selectmen for staggered three-year terms as designated by said Board of 
Selectmen, such appointments to be made annually by said Board of Selectmen on or before May 
thi rty- f i rst . Members shall serve until their successors are appointed and qualified. Continuing 
members may act despite a vacancy or vacancies in said board and for this purpose be deemed to 
constitute a full board. Any vacancy in said board, however occurring, may be filled by the Board of 
Selectmen for the unexpired portion of the term. 

Said board is hereby established and shall exercise its powers and perform its duties for the 
purpose of investigating and implementing alternatives for the provision of and providing affordable 
housing for persons of low, moderate and middle income, and others whose needs may be identified 
from time to time, in the Town of Wilmington. The powers and duties of said board as set forth 
herein are intended to be alternative and supplemental to, and not in limitation of, the powers and 
duties of the Wilmington Housing Authority established pursuant to chapter one hundred and 
twenty-one B of the General Laws. The liability of said board and its members shall be limited to 
the same extent as the liability of a public employer and public employees as provided in chapter 
two hundred and fifty-eight of the General Laws, and all amendments thereto. 

SECTION 2. Said board shall have the powers and privileges conferred by the provisions of 
paragraphs (a) to (i), inclusive, and paragraph (k) of section nine of chapter one hundred and 
fifty-six B of the General Laws, and the following powers, provided that no such power shall be 
exercised either in a manner inconsistent with this act or any general or special law, or to carry 
on any activity which is not in furtherance of the purposes set forth in this act: 

(a) to adopt, amend and repeal by-laws for the regulation and conduct of its business including but 
not limited to the call and conduct of its meetings, the number of members which shall 
constitute a quorum and the mode of voting by proxy; 



(b) to elect a chairman and vice-chairman, each of whom shall be members of said board, and a 
secretary and a treasurer, who need not be members of said board, and who may be the same 
person. The treasurer shall give bond for the faithful performance of his duties in form and 
amount approved and fixed by the Board of Selectmen, the cost of which bond shall be paid from 
funds of said board. The chairman and in his absence the vice-chairman shall chair meetings of 
said board. The secretary shall be the custodian of all books, documents and papers filed with 
said board and of the minute book or journal of said board; 

(c) with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to make and execute all contracts and all other 
instruments necessary or convenient for the exercise of its power and functions, subject to 
approval of the Town Counsel of the Town of Wilmington as to form; 

(d) with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to acquire or lease, by purchase or otherwise, and 
to own, hold and use, on such terms and conditions and in such manner as it may deem proper, 
and to exchange, grant options on, sell, transfer, convey, assign, lease, pledge, mortgage, 
encumber, grant liens on and security interests in, or otherwise dispose of, on such terms and 
conditions as it may deem proper, real, personal or mixed real and personal property or any 
interest, easements or rights therein, and any assets or revenues of said board, as may be 
necessary or appropriate to carry out its purposes; 

(e) with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to enter into agreements or other transactions 
with the Commonwealth or any political subdivision or public instrumentality thereof, the 
United States government or any federal, state or other governmental agency; 

(f.) with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow money and to execute notes therefor 
which shall not be deemed to be debts or obligations of the Town of Wilmington, to hold 
mortgages, and to invest any funds held in reserve funds, or any funds not required for 
immediate disbursement in such investments as may be lawful for fiduciaries in the 
Commonwealth. Said board shall have no stock; 

(a) with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to enter into contracts or agreements with, and to 
employ from time to time contractors, architects, engineers, consultants, attorneys, 
accountants, construction, financial and other experts, superintendents, managers and such 
other agents and employees as may be necessary in its judgment and to fix their compensation; 



-95- 



(Article 23 cont'd): ^ , _, ^ ^ 

(h) with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to receive and hold funds appropriated by the town 
and other funds, property, labor and other things of value from any source, public or private, 
by gift, grant,' bequest, loan or otherwise, either absolutely or in trust, and to expend or 
utilize'the same on behalf of said board for any of its purposes or to act as an agent or 
conduit in administering or disbursing funds or financial or other aid from any source; 
provided, however, that all revenues collected or received by said board in connection with its 
activities, investments or transactions shall be expended only with the approval of the Board 
of Selectmen of the Town of Uilmington. 

(i) to appear in its own behalf before boards, commissions, departments or other agencies of 
~ government, municipal, state or federal; 

(j_) to procure insurance against any loss in connection with the property or activities of said 
board, in such amounts and from such insurers as it may deem necessary or desirable, and, with 
the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to indemnify its members or agents if and to the extent 
specified from time to time in the by-laws of said board and subject to and in the manner 
provided in section six of chapter one hundred and eighty of the General Laws; 

(k) to formulate and, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, carry out or monitor plans for 
projects involving the acquisition or operation of housing facilities of any kind or nature, 
and to construct, reconstruct, renovate, expand, extend, improve, repair, remodel, equip, 
furnish, maintain, manage and operate such facilities; 

(1_) with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to fix and revise from time to time, and to charge 
and collect rates, fees, rentals and other charges and sales prices for or in connection with 
the use, occupancy or other disposition of any housing facility or other property or portion 
thereof under its ownership or control; 

(m) with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to establish, impose, grant or amend, by deed, 
lease or any other means or method, and to hold the benefit of, monitor, exercise and enforce 
lawful restrictions on the rental, sale, resale, use or occupancy of housing facilities or 
other property under its ownership or control, or other facilities or property designated by 
the Selectmen of the town, or restrictions with respect to the income of owners, tenants or 
occupants of such housing facilities or other property, or options and rights of first refusal 
with respect to such facilities or property, and to waive, release or discharge any such rights 
or restrictions; 

(n) with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to enter into, perform or monitor agreements or 
other transactions with contractors, developers, brokers or other real estate professionals or 
any other person relating to the providing of affordable housing for persons of low and 
moderate income in the town; 

(o) to do any and all things necessary or convenient to carry out its purposes and exercise the 
power conferred by this act. 



Said board may delegate to any committee or member of the board any action which said board is 
empowered to do or make. Said board may be a partner in any business enterprise which said board 
would have power to conduct by itself. 

SECTION 3. Notwithstanding the provisions of any general or special law to the contrary, the 
income, assets and activities of said board shall be exempt from all taxes and assessments and said 
board shall not be subject to any of the provisions of chapter sixty-three of the General Laws or to 
any taxes based upon or measured by property or income imposed by the Commonwealth or by any 
political subdivision thereof. Said board is hereby authorized and empowered to enter into an 
agreement or agreements with the Board of Assessors of the Town of Wilmington, with the approval of 
the Board of Selectmen, wherein said board shall undertake to make to the town annual payments in 
lieu of taxes in connection with any real property acquired and owned by said board, the amounts of 
such payments to be reasonable sums stipulated in such agreement or agreements or determined in 
accordance with a reasonable formula so stipulated. 

SECTION 4. Without limitation of the powers of said board set forth in section two, said board is 
authorized to receive and to expend and utilize for its purposes any proceeds of the sale of 
Town-owned land (tax title or low value) so authorized and designated for its use by a Town Meeting 
vote. In addition, the town may appropriate other funds for the carrying out by said board of its 
purposes as set forth herein. Any appropriation therefor may be raised by the town by taxation. At 
least annually, said board shall cause independent audits to be made of the books and records of 
said board, which annual audits shall be filed with the Board of Selectmen of the town. 



96- 



(Article 23 cont'd) 

SECTION 5. In the event that said board shall be dissolved in accordance with law at any time, all 
property and interests therein, assets and rights of said board existing at such time shall be 
transferred to the Town of Wilmington by authority of this act, and title to all such property and 
all such rights shall vest in the Town of Wilmington automatically without the need for further 
action or instrument, and the Town of Wilmington shall, to the maximum extent permitted by law, and 
acting by and through its Board of Selectmen, assume, hold and exercise the powers and duties of 
said board set forth herein with respect to such property and rights so transferred to said town. 

SECTION 6. The provisions of this act are severable and if any of its provisions shall be held 
invalid in any circumstance, such invalidity shall not affect any other provisions or circumstances; 

and to further petition the Great and General Court for a special act to establish and validate the 
above described non-profit affordable housing corporation for the Town of Wilmington; or do anything in 
relation thereto. 

Motion by James Stewart, the same as the above Article 23. Motion seconded. Finance Committee and 
Planning Board recommends approval. Rev. Stotts of the Affordable Task Force spoke on its merits, 
however their was a lot of disagreement from the audience and the privately formed Affordable group of 
the early 80's. A standing vote was taken. Yes 93 No 238. Motion lost. 

ARTICLE 24: (drawn as #4) ARTICLE 24: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum 
of $750.00 each (or a total of $3,000) for the purpose of renewing under the authority of Section 9 of 
Chapter 40 of the General Laws as amended, the lease of: 

a. Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse on Main Street for the purpose of providing suitable 
headquarters for the Nee-Ellsworth Post 2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States. 

b. American Legion Clubhouse, Inc. in Wilmington for the purpose of providing suitable 
headquarters for the Wilmington Post 136 of the American Legion. 

c. Marine Corp. League in Wilmington for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters for the 
Wilmington Charter; 

d. Disabled American Veterans for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters for the 
Wilmington Chapter; 

or do anything in relation thereto. Article by Petition Finance Committee recommends approval. 

Motion by Robert Ooucette, "I move that the town vote the same as article above". Finance Committee 
recommends approval. Motion seconded and so vote $3,000. 

ARTICLE 25: (drawn as #2) To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $5,500 for 
the observance of Memorial Day and Veterans Day and that the Moderator appoint a committee who shall 
arrange and have charge of said observances; or do anything in relation thereto. Article by Petition 

Motion by Michael McCoy, the same as the main article. Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion 
seconded and so voted $5,550. 

ARTICLE 26: (drawn as #25) To see if the Town will vote to accept a $48,352 Equal Educational 
Opportunity Grant for the Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational Technical High School District; or take 
any action relating thereto. Petition by Shawsheen Tech. Finance Committe recommends approval. Motion 
by Kevin Sowyrda same as the main motion. Seconded and voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 27: (drawn as #20) To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Section 1008 of 
M.G.L. Chapter 41 which provides for indemnification of retired police officers and firefighters; or to 
do anything in relation thereto. Article by Petition Finance Committee no action. 

Motion by James Stewart, "I move that the town vote to accept the provisions of Section 100B of M.G.L. 
Chapter 41 which provides for indemnification thereto." Motion seconded and so voted approved. 

ARTICLE 28: (drawn as #18) To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Section 100G1/4 of 
M.G.L. Chapter 41 which provides for the payment of funeral and burial expenses of police officers and 
firefighters killed in the performance of their duties; or to do anything in relation thereto. 
Article by Petition 

Motion by Phil Spelman, same as main article. Motion seconded and so voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 29: (drawn as #24) To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen of the Town of 
Wilmington to grant a drainage easement to Reading Realty Trust over a portion of certain Parcels of 
Town owned land shown as Parcels 46 and 51A on Assessor's Map 6, and being further described and defined 
as follows: 



-97- 



(Article 29 cont'd) 

Beginning at the Southerly most corner of the hereinafter described Easement, said point lying on 
the lot line between Parcels 51 and A6, a distance of 78.00 Northerly of the sideline of Ualnut Street, 
the line runs. Northerly for a distance of 50.00 feet along the lot line between Parcels 51 and 46 to an 
angle point at Parcel 51A, thence the line turns and runs. Northerly for a distance of 50.00 feet along 
the lot line between Parcel 51 and Parcel 51A to a point, thence Southeasterly for a distance of 32.45 
feet across Parcel 51A to Parcel 50, thence Southerly for a distance of 25.00 feet along the lot lines 
between Parcels 50 and 51A to the lot corner of Parcel 46, thence continuing Southerly for a distance of 
52.37 feet across Parcel 46 to the point of beginning. 

Said Easement being shown as a Drain Easement continuing 1,563 square feet on a Plan of Land in 
Wilmington, MA. prepared for Northeastern Development Corporation dated November 2, 1988 and drawn by 
Robert E. Anderson, Inc.; or do anything in relation thereto. Article by Petition 

ARTICLE 30: (drawn as #19) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-laws and the Zoning Map 
of the Town of Wilmington by voting to zone in Aquifer Protection Recharge Districts for each active 
well-site and potential well-sites as identified in the Groundwater Protection Study done, by B.U. 
Pauling, Jr., West Groton, Mass. Project 8223 for the Town of Wilmington. 

Purpose: The Aquifer Protection Recharge District covers the aquifer ground-water feed underlay area of 
each well-site. This district is intended to protect the well-sites from the hazards of pollution and 
to assure that each well-site is properly recharged to keep the well-site operating at it's planned 
capacity even in cases of years of prolonged rainfall shortages which could or may affect the amount of 
water that the well-site is planned for while in full production, required for supplying water to the 
residents of Wilmington. 

This Aquifer Protection Recharge District for each existing and potential well-site; is that area which 
lies within a circle having a radius of one-half mile, 2,640 feet from the center of each well-site and 
potential site. This current recommended State Standard of one-half mile applies unless a detailed 
hydrological study is done upon each specific site. That study will then be used to define the Aqui f er 
Protection Recharge District for that well-site. 

Prior established uses, homes and industries that now exist in these areas will be allowed to exist but 
not expanded nor changed from their present allowed use as of the date of passing of this article. 
Future changes will be allowed, but they must first be presented before the residents of the Town of 
Wilmington at an Annual Town Meeting for the voters approval. These changes include any and all actions 
that can disturb the Aquifer Protection Recharge District . Additionally, action taken by any Board, 
Commission, or Authority of the Town of Wilmington unless changes or corrections are required that are 
of an emergency nature and affect the health and welfare of the residents of Wilmington are also 
required to be brought before the voters of the town for approval. 

As Wilmington now has no formal Groundwater Aquifer Protection zoning by-laws, present Zoning By-laws 
are to be amended and a new section added that will be similar and separate as now exist in 6.2 (Flood 
Plain District) covering Aquifer Protection Recharge District . 

New construction, other uses, subdivisions, industrial expansion in the designated Aquifer Protection 
Recharge District is prohibited until it has been presented for approval of the residents at an Annual 
Town Meeting for it's approval by a 2/3rds majority. 

Exception : Individual lots for residential homes as allowed by existing zoning can be erected, but only 
after approval by the Building Inspector, Board of Health, Conservation Commission, Water and Sewer, 
(only with hook-up to existing lines), plus final approval of the Board of Selectmen. Requirements 
needed to be met, is to show satisfactory proof that what is being erected will in no way affect the 
quality or quantity of the groundwater which underlays the Aquifer Protection Recharge District that the 
residence is being built within. 

The purpose of amending the Zoning By-laws and the Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington is to "ensure an 
adequate volume and quality of water for all citizens of the Town of Wilmington, both present and 
future". 

This amendment calls for management of the Town of Wilmington's surface and groundwater systems. This 
amendment will be in effect upon acceptance of this article by this Town Meeting. Then the Town 
Manager, and appropriate Boards of the Town will take the required actions to see that the maps and 
Zoning By-laws are placed into formal documentation for presentation to the residents at the next Annual 
Town Meeting; or do anything in relation thereto. Article by Petition 

Motion by Conrad Gerhartz, the same as the main article. Motion seconded. After much discussion. Water 
Commissioner Arthur Smith claimed it was not in the best interest of the town at all, and that the Water 
and Sewer Commission is working on a project for the protection of our water. Finance Committee 
recommends disapproval. Planning Board recommends disapproval. Standing vote was taken. Yes 39 No 
145. Motion lost. 



-98- 



ARTICLE 31: To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and the Zoning Map of the Town of 
Wilmington by voting to rezone from General Industrial District (GI) to Residence 60 District (R-60) 
that land described as follows: 

All lands now zoned as General Industrial District (GI) that lie to the South of Route 125, to the east 
of Interstate Route 93, to the north of Route 62, and then west of the North Reading line which lies 
within circles having a radius of one/half mile (2640 feet) from the center of the Town of Wilmington's 
Brown's Crossing and the Salem Street well-sites. 

The area within these circles to be considered as Aquifer feed area to the named well-sites. 
Established industries will be allowed to exist but not expanded nor changed in nature from present 
allowed use. All further use of present and re-zoned Residence 60 District (R-60), of the unbuilt 
lands, will be presented before the residents of the Town of Wilmington at an Annual Town Meeting, 
including that land owned and operated by any Board, Commission or Authority for, of the Town of 
Wilmington: or do anything in relation thereto. Article by Petition 

Motion by Conrad Gerhartz, same as the main article. Motion seconded. After much discussion. Water 
Commissioner Arthur Smith claimed it was not in the best interest of the town at all, and that to rezone 
in this manner could get the town involved in many legal actions . Finance Committee and Planning Board 
recommends disapproval. A standing vote was taken as a 2/3rds vote is required. Yes 41 No 116. 
Motion lost. 

ARTICLE 32: (drawn #27) To see if the Town will vote to amend, delete or add as the case may be, to 
the Wilmington Zoning Bylaw as follows: 

Amend by adding in Section 8.5 after the sentence "A special permit is a permit to use property for 
the purpose specified and shall not reverse, alter or vary any provision of this By-law applicable 
thereto." add the sentence: "Special Permits shall not be changed by way of variances as provided 
for in Section 8,3.3 of this By-law" or do anything in relation thereto. Article by Petition 

Motion by Scott Kent, the same as the main article. Motion seconded . Finance Committee recommends no 
action. Planning Board recommends approval. 2/3rd vote required. Yes 103 No 36. Voted. 

ARTICLE 33: To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law by adding the following section the 
"Definitions" as follows: 

1.3.17 A restaurant is an establishment where food is prepared on the premises for the purpose of 
sale to customers whether at a table or counter for consumption on the premises or enclosed patio or 
off the premises as carry out orders and may be allowed only as provided in section 3.5.4 Limited 
Service Restaurant or 3.5.5 General Service Restaurant; or do anything in relation thereto. Article 
by Petition 

Finance Committe and Planing Board recommends approval. Article was withdrawn by James Meehan without 
prejudice. Withdrawn 

ARTICLE 34: (drawn #5) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Zoning Map of the 
Town of Wilmington by voting to rezone from Residential 60 (R-60) District to Residence 20 (R-20) the 
following described parcel of land: 

Southwesterly for a distance of 121.53 by land of said Sciarappa to a corner, thence northeasterly 
for a distance of 408.58 by land of said Sciarappa to an iron pipe at a corner thence westerly for a 
distance of 1181.57 feet still by land of said Sciarappa to a corner of land of A. A. Tambone and 
J.W. Blackman III, thence northerly for a distance of 1315.61 feet by land of said Tambone and 
Blackman to a corner of land of the Town of Wilmington, thence easterly for a distance of 754.62 by 
land of the Town of Wilmington to a concrete bound at the corner, thence southerly for a distance of 
683.06 feet still by land of the Town of Wilmington to an iron pipe at the corner, thence easterly 
for a distance of 553.80 feet still by land of the Town of Wilmington to a drill hole at a corner of 
a stone wall at land of Scott A. Ferguson, thence southerly for a total distance of 1217.54 along a 
stone wall by land of said Ferguson and land of Albert G. Fiorenza, Scott W. Richmond and Antionette 
M. Volpe, Edward F. and Lorraine R. Hanlon and land of Joseph F. and Stella Courtney to a corner of 
the stone wall, thence easterly for a distance of 110.50 feet by land of aforementioned Courtney to 
a corner on the westerly sideline of Andover Street, thence southerly for a distance of 183.53 feet 
along the sideline of Andover Street, a public way, to the point of beginning. Said parcel being 
shown generally as Parcels 3, 19, 21, 33 and 34 on the Town of Wilmington Assessors' Map R-3 and 
containing 40.66 acres; or do anything in relation thereto. Article by Petition 

Motion by Robert Peterson, reads same as main article. Finance Commitee and Planning Board recommends 
disapproval. Motion seconded. Many spoke for and against this change. 2/3rds vote required. Yes 224 
No 38 So voted. 



-99- 



ARTICLE 35: (drawn #16) To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning by-laws and the associated 
zoning map by zoning from General Industrial (GI) to High Density Business (HDB) the following parcel of 
land: 

A certain parcel of land with the buildings thereon situated in Wilmington, Middlesex County, 
Massachusetts, and being shown as Lots 1, 2, 4 and 5 on a plan entitled "Plan of Lots in Wilmington, 
Mass., Scale 1 in. - 20 ft., October 19, 1966, Rowland H. Barnes & Co., Civil Engineers", recorded 
withMiddlesex North District of Deeds, Plan Book 104, Plan 130, and said Lots are together bounded 
and described as follows: Beginning at a point at the Southwesterly corner of said Lot 2 on the 
Easterly side line of Middlesex Avenue at land of Shell Oil Co., being Lot 3 on said plan; thence 
running Northerly, and Northeasterly by said Middlesex Avenue in three (3) courses, fifty (50) feet, 
thirty-eight (38) feet and ninety-two and 05/100 (92.05) feet, respectively; to land of Boston and 
Maine Railroad, as shown on said plan, thence turning and running Southeasterly by said Boston and 
Maine Railroad land, three hundred forty-seven and 16/100 (347.16) feet to land of Wilmington 
Development Co., Inc. as shown on said plan; thence turning and running Southwesterly by said 
Wilmington Development Co., Inc. land, as shown on said plan, one hundred forty-three and 45/100 
(143.45) feet to Lot 6 as shown on said plan; thence turning and running Northeasterly and 
Northwesterly in three (3) courses, seventy-four and 97/100 (74.97) feet, twenty-four and 16/100 
(24.16) feet and sixty-two and 91/100 (62.91) feet, respectively, to a point at the Northerly line 
of said Lot 3; thence turning and running Westerly by said Lot 3, as shown on said plan, fifty (50) 
feet to said Middlesex Avenue and the point of beginning. Said Lot 1 contains 22,381 square feet; 
said Lot 2 contains 1,249 square feet; said Lot 4 contains 133 square feet and said Lot 5 contains 
5,062 square feet, be any or all of said measurements more or less, according to plan. Said 
premises are conveyed subject to and with the benefit of Easements over said Lot 2 as set forth in a 
deed to said Shell Oil Co., dated November 30, 1966, recorded with said Deeds, Book 1779, Page 94. 
Said premises are also conveyed subject to and with the benefit of any restrictions and easements of 
record, insofar as the same or now in force and applicable. For title, see deed of Albert G. 
Fiorenza, Trustee dated January 15, 1986 and recorded at Middlesex North Registry of Deeds Book 
3325, Page 150. 

or to do anything in relation thereto. Article by Petition The petitioner withdrew this article prior 
to Town Meeting and Moderator so stated. So voted to withdraw, 

ARTICLE 36: (drawn as #21) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Zoning Map of 
the Town of Wilmington by voting to rezone from Residential 20 (R-20) to Residential 10 (R-10) the 
following parcel of land: 

Lot 1 and Lot 2 as shown on a plan entitled "Subdivison Plan of Land in Wilmington" dated November 
10, 1988, and prepared by Middlesex Survey, Inc., Land Surveyors , 131 Park Street, North Reading, 
Massachusetts, Scale one inch equals 20 feet (1" = 20'), said land consisting of 22,723 square feet 
of land area more or less according to said plan, a copy of which plan is filed in the Office of the 
Town Clerk. Said land is shown as Parcel 86 on the Town of Wilmington Assessors' Map 32, and is the 
premises conveyed to Joseph S. Maison and Paul I. Olson by deed dated July 29, 1982, and recorded 
with Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in Book 2548, Page 698; or do anything in relation 
thereto. Article by Petition 

Motion by James Stewart because petitioner Mr. Maison is not a voter. Motion seconded. Finance 
Committee and Planning Board recommends disapproval. 2/3rds vote required. Yes 149 No 20 Motion so 
voted. 



ARTICLE 37: (drawn as #9) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Zoning Map of 
the Town of Wilmington by voting to rezone from Residential 20 (R20) District to Neighborhood Business 
(NB) District the following described parcel of land: 

That parcel of land with the buildings thereon, situated at, and now known as and numbered, 306 Main 
Street, on the easterly side of said street, being Lot 1 as shown on a plan dated November 3, 1926, 
recorded with Middlesex North District Deeds, Book of Plans 49, Plan 73, bounded and described as 
follows: Beginning at the southwesterly corner of Main Street at Lot 7 on said plan, thence 

Northwesterly on Main Street, nineteen and 54/100 (19.54) feet to a stone 

bound, thence still by Main Street, thirty-nine and 96/100 

(39.96) feet to an angle; thence 
Northerly and 

Northeasterly on a curved line, fifteen (15) feet, more or less, to a 
stonebound; thence 

Easterly on Clark Street, one hundred forty-five and 96/100 (145.96) feet 

to Lot 2 on said plan; thence 
Southerly on said Lot 2, sixty-six and 75/100 (66.75) feet to Lot 7 on 

said plan; thence 

Westerly by said Lot 7, on hundred thirty-nine and 32/100 (139.32) feet 
to the point of beginning. 



-100- 



(Article 37 cont'd) 

Containing 9,950 square feet, more or less, or however otherwise bounded, measured or described, be 
any or all of these measurements more or less. 

Said parcel being shown generally as Parcel 53 on the Town of Wilmington Assessors' Hap 42; 
or do anything in relation thereto. Article by Petition 



Motion by Finance Committee recommends no action and Planning Board recommends disapproval, 
petitioner withdrew this article prior to Town Meeting. So voted withdrawn. 



The 



ARTICLE 38: (drawn as #8) To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 5.3.4 of the zoning by-laws of 
the Town of Wilmington by deleting the words ". . . no more than two hammerhead lots shall have 
contiguous frontage . . .", or do anything in relation thereto. Article by Petition. 



Motion by Robert Peterson, "I move that the town vote, th 
2/3rds vote required. After much discussion, vote was taken 



e same 



as the article above. Motion seconded. 
Yes 6 No 180. Motion lost. 



The Annual Town Meeting was opened after the completion of the Special Town Meeting. All preliminary 
proceedings were done upon the opening of the Special Town Meeting. The afternoon session had three 
hundred eighty (380) voters and fifty (50) non-voters, and the evening session had one hundred 
ninety-seven (197) voters and (12) non-voters. All articles after Article 7 were drawn at random as 
prescribed in our Town by-laws. The meeting adjourned at 6:00 P.M. for dinner and reconvened at 7:52 
p.m. with a quorum present. The Moderator declared he would entertain a motion to adjourn at 11:14 
p.m. Chairman James Stewart rose to thank all those who stayed to finish and thanked our Moderator for 
the good job he did in spite of the fact that his father Aldo Caira, Sr. had been taken to the hospital 
that same day. 

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS FOR FY 90 



TOTAL TO BE RAISED 
Town Budget 
School Budget 
Warrant Articles 
Statutory Charges 
TOTAL to be raised 



15,469,372 
13,716,729 
106,488 
2.335.499 
31,628,088 



AVAILABLE FUNDS 
Water 
Free Cash 
Cemetery 
Chapter 90 
FY 89 

TOTAL Avai lable 



1,050,000 
328,296 
34,820 
173,088 
357.500 

1,943,684 



TOTAL APPROPRIATION 
BONDING 



$33,571,772 
747,000 



Prisci I la R.W. Lynch 
Town Clerk 
Wilmington, Mass. 



WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION 
JUNE 13, 1989 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: THE CONSTABLES OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you are hereby required to notify and warn 
the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in Elections to assemble at the Town Hall 
Auditorium, (Precincts 1, 2 & 5) and Wildwood Street School (Precincts 3, 4 & 6,) Tuesday, the 
thirteenth day of June 1989, the polls to be opened from 7:00 a.m. and shall be closed at 8:00 p.m. for 
the following purposes: 

BALLOT QUESTIONS 

Question #1: "Shall the Town of Wilmington be allowed to assess and additional $632,180 in real estate 
and personal property taxes for the purpose of meeting operating expenses of the Wilmington School 
Department for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1989?" Yes No 

Question #2: "Shall the Town of Wilmington be allowed to exempt from the provisions of Proposition Two 
and One Half (2 1/2), so called, the amounts required to pay the bond issued in order to acquire, for 
the sum of $125,000 a 21.49 acre parcel of land on Patches Pond for conservation and open space 
purposes?" Yes No 



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All was in readiness at 6:45 a.m. when the Town Clerk read the warrant and polls were declared open at 
7:00 a. m. 

The totals from the twenty-five machines plus the absentee ballots were recorded and declaration thereof 
made, as by law is directed: 

Question #1 YES 1,154 NO 1,908 

Question #2 YES 1,052 NO 1,958 

The polls were closed at 8:00 p.m. with three thousand sixty-eight (3,068) voters voting and 
twenty-seven (27) absentee ballots cast for the total of three thousand ninety-five (3,095). 30.098X of 
the 10,283 registered voters. 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON. MASSACHUSETTS SPECIAL TOWN MEETING. OCTOBER 16. 1989 



Greetings: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By-Laws 
of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the Inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote 
in Town affairs to meet and assemble at the Gushing Gymnasium, Wilmington High School, Church Street, on 
Monday the sixteenth day of October, 1989 at 7:30 p.m., then and there to act on the following articles: 

With a quorum being present at 7:35 p.m. the Moderator called the meeting to order, opening with the 
Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag. He then explained the procedures for open town meeting. He then read 
the warrant to this point where he was interrupted by Robert Cain, with a motion, " I move that the 
Moderator dispense with further reading of the Warrant and take up and make reference to each article by 
number." motion was seconded and the moderator drew the first of the random selections first being 
Article 13. 

ARTICLE 1: (drawn as #12) To see if the Town will vote to amend the votes taken under Article 5 of the 
Warrant of Annual Town Meeting held on April 22, 1989 by reducing, transferring or taking any other 
action relative thereto in the following departments and/or line items: 

A Department of Public Works 

B Miscellaneous - Unclassified and Reserve 

C Schools - Wilmington School Department 

D Schools - Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational School District 
or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee recommended approval 

Motion by Reginald Stapczynski, "I move that the Town vote to amend the votes taken under Article 5 of 
the Annual Town Meeting held on April 22, 1989 by reducing or transferring certain sums raised and 
appropriated in the 

A. Department of Public Works: 

1. Reduce the line item entitled Engineering Division - Salaries by $8,039 so that the amount 
raised by taxation will be $130,824. 

2. Transfer the sum of $2,906 from Chapter 90 Construction Account to the line item entitled 
Tree Division - Salaries and reduce the amount raised by taxation to $78,309. 

3. Transfer the sum of $68,222 from Chapter 90 Construction Account to the line item entitled 
Highway Division - Other Salaries and reduce the amount raised by taxation to $649,105. 

The motion was seconded and the total amount of $79,167 was voted to be dispersed as indicated Motion 
was unanimously so voted. 

Motion by Chester A. Bruce, "I move that the Town vote to amend the votes taken under Article 5 of the 
Annual Town Meeting held on April 22, 1989 by reducing certain sums raised and appropriated in the 

B: Miscellaneous - Unclassified and Reserve Account: 

1. Reduce the line item entitled Insurance and Bonds Account by $66,000 so that the amount 
raised by taxation will be $583,200. 

2. Reduce the line item entitled MWRA Sewer Assessment Account by $126,349 so that the amount 
raised by taxation will be $660,581. 

The motion was seconded and the total amount of $192,349 was voted to be dispersed as indicated Motion 
was unanimously so voted 

Motion by James Stewart: "I move that the Town vote to amend the votes taken under Article 5 of the 

Annual Town Meeting held on April 22, 1989 by reducing a certain sum raised and appropriated in the 

C: School Department: 

1. Reduce the line item entitled Wilmington School Department by $142,000 so that the amount 
raised by taxation will be $12,463,326. Furthermore, if the Town receives an additional 
$464,000. or thereabouts in State Aid, the reduction to the line item entitled Wilmington 
School department will be reduced by $0. 

The motion was seconded and the total amount of $142,000 was voted to be dispersed as indicated Motion 

was unanimously so voted. 



-102- 



Motion by Kevin Sowyrda: "I move that the Town vote to amend the votes taken under Article 5 of the 
Annual Town Meeting held on April 22, 1989 by reducing a certain sum raised and appropriated in the 

D: Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational Technical School District budget: 

1. Reduce the line item entitled Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational Technical School District 
by $24,318 so that the amount raised by taxation will be $1,065,485. 
The motion was seconded and the total amount of $24,318 was voted to be dispersed as indicated Motion 
was unanimously so voted. 

ARTICLE 2: (drawn as #11) To see if the Town will vote to amend the actions taken under Article 6 of 
the Warrant of the Annual Town Meeting held on April 22, 1989 wherein the sum of $72,500 was 
appropriated for the Police Department, replacement of five (5) police cruisers, previously raised by 
transfer and by this action, in the alternative, transfer said $72,500 to Police Department, Patrolmen 
salary line item; also to amend the action taken at said Town Meeting 

Annual Town Meeting wherein the sum of $45,000 was appropriated for Animal Control, construction of 
animal shelter, previously raised by transfer and by this action, in the alternative, transfer said 
$45,000 to Fire Department, Private salary line item; or do anything in relation thereto. 
Finance Committee recommended approval 

Motion by Robert Doucette "I move that the Town vote to amend the votes taken under Article 6 of the 
Annual Town Meeting held on April 22, 1989 by reducing certain sums raised and appropriated in the 
following items: 

A. Transfer the sum of $72,500 from the line item entitled Police Department - Replacement of Five 
(5 Police Cruisers, which was previously transferred from appropriation balances, to the line 
item entitled Police Department - Patrolman Salaries and reduce the amount appropriated by 
taxation to $879,851. Seconded and unanimously so voted 

B. Transfer the sum of $45,000 from the line item entitled Animal Control, Construction of Animal 
Shelter, which was previously transferred from appropriation balances, to the line item entitled 
Fire Department - Private Salaries and reduce the amount to be raised by taxation to $762,655. 
Seconded and unanimously so voted 

ARTICLE 3: (drawn #3) To see if the Town will vote to amend the actions taken under Article 5 of the 
Warrant of the Annual Town Meeting held on April 22, 1989 wherein the sum of $19,000 was raised by 
taxation and appropriated for Maintenance of Public Buildings, Town Maintenance and Operations - Capital 
Outlay (football field/track storage building), and by this action reduce the amount raised by taxation 
by $19,000 and in the alternative raise said sum by transfer from the insurance reimbursement account 
which is anticipated to be received from a fire loss at the football field/track former storage 
building; or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee recommended approval. 

Motion, Robert J. Cain, "I move that the Town vote to amend the vote taken under Article 5 of the 
Warrant of the Annual Town Meeting held on April 22, 1989 by reducing the amount raised by taxation for 
the line item entitled Maintenance of Public Buildings, Town Building Maintenance,- Capital Outlay 
(football field/track storage building), by the amount of $19,000 and to raise said $19,000 by transfer 
from the Insurance Reimbursement Account." Seconded and unanimously so voted 

ARTICLE 4: (drawn as #9) To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $18,886 for 
the Maintenance of Public Buildings - School Maintenance and Operations - Capital Outlay Account (Woburn 
Street School heating system) to be raised by transfer from the insurance reimbursement account which 
amount was received from an insurance settlement concerning a fire loss in the Woburn Street School 
boiler room; or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee recommended approval. 

Motion by Michael McCoy, "I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $18,886 for the 
Maintenance of Public Buildings - School Maintenance and Operations - Capital Outlay Account (Woburn 
Street School heating system) to be raised by transfer from the Insurance Reimbursement Account, which 
amount was received from an insurance settlement concerning a fire loss in the Woburn Street School 
boiler room." Motion seconded so voted 

ARTICLE 5: (drawn as #8) To see if the Town will vote to rescind the actions taken in Article 11 of 
the Annual Town Meeting held on April 26, 1986 and Article 10 of the Annual Town Meeting held on April 
25, 1987 to establish a municipal electric plant pursuant to M.G.L. Chapter 164 and furthermore to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager subject to entering into an acceptance agreement with 
the Reading Municipal Light Board for the supply of electric services, to accept payments of in lieu of 
taxes and, to take all other actions incidental or necessary thereto; or do anything in relation 
thereto. Finance Committee No action. Motion by James Stewart, "I move that the Town vote to pass 
over this article and take no action thereon." Seconded and so voted to pass over. 

ARTICLE 6: (drawn as #7) To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money for reconstructing 
and making extraordinary repairs to the heating system of the present high school, and to determine 
whether such appropriation shall be raised taxation, transfers from available funds or by borrowing or 



-103 



(Article 6 cont'd): 

otherwise- or to take any other action relative thereto. Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion 
by Reginald Stapczynski, "I move that the sum of $852,705 is hereby appropriated for reconstructing and 
making extraordinary repairs to the heating system of the present high school, that to raise such 
appropriation the Town Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen is hereby authorized to borrow the 
sum of $852,705 under and pursuant to M.G.L. Chapter 44, Section 7 as amended and supplemented, or any 
other enabling authority; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen or Town Manager to accept any state or 
other grants that may be available for the foregoing purposes; and to issue bonds or notes of the Town 
therefor and further provided that no bonds or notes be issued hereunder until the Town votes to exempt 
principal and interest from the Proposition 2 1/2 limitations; and that a special election be called for 
November 4, 1989 contingent upon an affirmative vote at this Special Town Meeting, for the purpose of 
obtaining the necessary debt exemption." Motion seconded After much discussion and an hour later the 
vote was taken. Yes 295 No 28 So voted 

ARTICLE 7: (drawn as #5) To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money for remodeling, 
reconstructing and making extraordinary repairs to the Barrows Auditorium of the present high school, 
and to determine whether such appropriation shall be raised by taxation, transfer from available funds 
or by borrowing or otherwise; or to take any other action relative thereto. Finance Committee 
recommends no action. Motion by Robert J. Cain. "1 move that the Town vote to pass over this article 
and take no action thereon. Motion seconded and so voted to pass over 

ARTICLE 8: (Drawn as #2) To see if the Town will vote to accept a gift of money from the Wilmington 
Redevelopment Authority for the purpose of balancing the Town budget for Fiscal Year 1990; or do 
anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee recommends approval Motion by Robert Cain. "I move 
that the Town vote to accept the sum of $110,685 as a gift from the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority 
for the purpose of balancing the municipal budget for Fiscal Year 1990." Motion seconded after much 
discussion and a public Thank You from the Board of Selectmen was unanimously so voted. 

ARTICLE 9: (Drawn as #6) To see if the Town will accept as Town ways, the layout of the following 
described streets, as recommended by the Planning Board and approved by the Board of Selectmen (M.G.L. 
Ch. 82 as amended) and shown on Definitive Subdivision plans approved in accordance with the "Rules and 
Regulations Governing the Sub-Division of Land in the Town of Wilmington, Massachusetts", and which 
plans are recorded at the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds (M.N.R.D.), copies of which are available in 
the office of the Town Engineer and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by right of eminent 
domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect the purpose of 
this Article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised whether by taxation or by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise for the purpose of construction of said ways and for the 
payment of any damages from the takings of land and slope easements and other easements therefor: 
Finance Committee recommendes approval. 

Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move that the Town vote to accept as Town ways, the layout of the following 
described streets, as recommended by the Planning Board and approved by the Board of Selectmen (M.G.L. 
Ch. 82 as amended) and shown on Definitive Subdivision plans approved in accordance with the "Rules and 
Regulations Governing the Sub-Division of Land in the Town of Wilmington, Massachusetts", and which 
plans are recorded at the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds (M.N.R.D.), copies of which are available in 
the office of the Town Engineer and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by right of eminent 
domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect the purpose of 
this Article, and vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $100 for the purpose of 
construction of said ways and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land, slope, 
drainage or other easements therefor: 

a. Blanchard Road , from Kendall Road, a distance of 625' more or less northerly to a dead end, as shown 
on definitive subdivision plan entitled Blanchard Road and recorded at the M.N.R.D. Plan Book No. 144 
and Plan No. 118 dated August 16, 1984. 

b. Great Neck Drive , from Woburn Street, a distance of 536' more or less southwesterly to a dead end, 
as shown on definitive subdivision plan entitled Great Neck Road and recorded at the M.N.R.D. Plan Book 
No. 142 and Plan No. 128 dated May 14, 1984. 

c. Palmer Way , from Middlesex Avenue, a distance of 1437' more or less westerly thence northerly to a 
dead end, as shown a definitive subdivision plan entitled Middlesex Pines I and recorded at the M.N.R.D. 
Plan Book No. 142 and Plan No. 60 dated January 26, 1984. 

Douglas Avenue, from Palmer Way, a distance of 1017' more or less southerly thence westerly to a 
dead end, as shown on definitive subdivision plan entitled Middlesex Pines II and recorded at the 
M.N.R.D. Plan Book No. 144 and Plan No. 119 dated August 16, 1984. 

e. Fox Run Drive, from High Street, a distance of 975' more or less northerly thence westerly to a dead 
end. As shown on definitive subdivision plan entitled Fox Run Drive and recorded at the M.N.R.D. Plan 
Book No. 152 and Plan No. 84 dated March 4, 1986. 

f. Kajin Way, from Woburn Street, a distance of 455' more or less southwesterly to a dead end, as shown 
on definitive subdivision plan entitled Sidelinker Farm and recorded at the M.N.R.D. Plan Book No. 153 
and Plan No. 85 dated May 13, 1986. 

g. Valyn Lane, from Salem Street, a distance of 608' more or less northeasterly to a dead end, as shown 
on definitive subdivision plan entitled Newell Estates and recorded at the M.N.R.D. Plan Book No. 143 
and Plan No. 65 & 71 dated October 9, 1987. 



-104- 



(Article 9 cont'd): 



h. Gloria Way , from Broad Street, a distance of 770' more or less southwesterly to a dead end, as shown 
on definitive subdivision plan entitled Gloria Way and recorded at the M.N.R.D. Plan Book No. 153 and 
Plan No. 97 dated May 16, 1986. 

i. Research Drive , from Ballardvale Street, a distance of 1817' more or less northeasterly to a dead 
end, as shown on definitive subdivision plan entitled Wilmington Technology Park and recorded at the 
M.N.R.D. Plan Book No. 156 and Plan No. 67 dated October 24, 1986. 

j. Tomahawk Drive , from Aldrich Road, a distance of 575' more or less northeasterly to a dead end, as 
shown on definitive subdivision plan entitled Tomahawk Drive and recorded at the M.N.R.D. Plan Book No. 
149 and Plan No. 8 dated July 16, 1985. 

k. Gearty Street , from Ring Avenue, a distance of 627' more or less northwesterly to Pilcher Drive, as 
shown on definitive subdivision plan entitled Corum Meadows and recorded at the M.N.R.D. Plan Book No. 
114 and Plan No. 56 dated April 26, 1972. 

I. Pilcher Drive , across the end of Gearty Street, a distance of 410' more or less, from the southerly 
property line of Lot 51 to the northerly property line of Lot 42, as shown on definitive subdivision 
plan entitled Corum Meadows and recorded at the M.N.R.D. Plan Book No. 114 and Plan No. 56 dated April 
26, 1972. 

m. Flagstaff Road , from Nichols Street a distance of 587' more or less northeasterly to a dead end, as 
shown on definitive subdivison plan entitled Flagstaff Road, Oakland Park, Section 1 and recorded at the 
M.N.R.D. Plan Book No. 147 and Plan No. 129 dated October 23, 1984. or do anything in relation thereto. 
Finance Committee recommendeds approval Motion seconded and unanimously so voted. 

ARTICLE 10: Drawn as #13the) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Zoning Map 
of the Town of Wilmington by voting to rezone from Residential 60 (R-60) District to Residence 20 (R-20) 
the following described parcel of land: 

NORTHEASTERLY by an unnamed street now called Hopkins Street, two hundred (200) feet; 

SOUTHEASTERLY by Lot 158, as shown on said Plan, five hundred and forty (540) feet; 

SOUTHWESTERLY by land of owners unknown, one hundred sixty (160) feet, more or less; and 

NORTHWESTERLY by land of owners unknown by four hundred and eighty-eight (488) feet. 
Containing 89,950 square feet of land according to said Plan. Said parcel being shown generally as 
Parcel 10B on the Town of Wilmington Assessor's Map 22, or do anything in relation thereto. Article by 
petition Finance Committee recommends approval Planning Board recommends approval 

Motion by Diane Foley, "I move that the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Zoning Map of the 
Town of Wilmington by voting to rezone from Residential 60 (R-60) District to Residence 20 (R-20) the 
following described parcel of land:" Motion being the same as the main article the reading of the 
discription was eliminated. Motion was seconded and voted unanimously So voted. 

ARTICLE 11: (Drawn as #4) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Zoning Map of 
the Town of Wilmington or take whatever action necessary to rezone from Residential 20 (R20) District to 
High-Density Business District, the following described parcel of land; located at 153 Burlington 
Avenue: The land in Wilmington, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, with buildings thereon, being shown as 
Parcel C-2 and Parcel C on a Plan of Land entitled: "Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass., Scale 1"=40, 
July 8, 1975, Dana Perkins & Sons, Inc., Civil Engineers & Surveyors, Lowell & Reading, Mass., Surveyed 
for Kevin C. Sullivan." Said plan is recorded in the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in Plan 
Book 120, Plan 157. Said parcels are more particularly described as follows: 

PARCEL C-2 Beginning at the Southeasterly corner of the premises at land now or formerly of Kevin C. 
Sullivan, thence SOUTHWESTERLY by Parcel C on said plan in two courses. Three Hundred Forty-four and 
05/100 (344.05) feet; NORTHERLY by land now or formerly of Kevin C. Sullivan, One Hundred Ninety and 
37/100 (190.37) feet; NORTHEASTERLY by land now or formerly of Kevin C. Sullivan, Two Hundred Two and 
08/100 (202,08) feet; EASTERLY by land now or formerly of Kevin C. Sullivan, Forty and 00/100 (40.00) 
Feet to the beginning. Said parcel contains 9,326 feet according to said plan. 

PARCEL C Beginning at the Southeasterly corner of the premises at land now or formerly of Kevin C, 
Sullivan; thence SOUTHERLY by land now or formerly of Matthew Comerford, Jr., according to said plan. 
Two Hundred Eighty-nine and 03/100 (289.03) feet; WESTERLY by Lot B on said plan, fifty and 74/100 
(50.74) feet; SOUTHERLY by Lot B on said plan, thirty and 00/100 (30.00) feet; WESTERLY by Parcel C-1 on 
said plan. One Hundred Thirty-two and 13/100 (132.13) feet; NORTHERLY by land now formerly of Kevin C. 
Sullivan, Thirteen and 34/100 (13.34) feet; NORTHEASTERLY by Parcel C-2 on said plan in two courses, 
Three Hundred Forty-four and 05/100 (344.05) feet to the beginning. Said Parcel C contains 36,202 feet 
according to said plan. 

Also , a certain parcel of land with the buildings thereon, situated in said Wilmington on Burlington 
Avenue and being shown as Lot 2 on "Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass.," May 18, 1973, Dana F. Perkins & 
Sons, Inc., Civil Engineers and Surveyors, recorded with Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, 
Plan Book 117, Plan 71, and bounded and described as follows: 

SOUTHWESTERLY by Burlington Avenue, one hundred, forty-two and 80/100 (142.80) feet; NORTHWESTERLY by 
Lot 1 as shown on said plan, one hundred seventy-five (175) feet; NORTHERLY by said Lot 1, two hundred 
eighty-nine and 03/100 (289.03) feet; SOUTHEASTERLY by land now or formerly of Kevin C. Sullivan, two 
hundred and 85/100 (200.85) feet; SOUTHWESTERLY by said land now or formerly of Kevin C. Sullivan, 
thirty-seven and 23/100 (37.23) feet; SOUTHEASTERLY by said land now or formerly of Kevin C. Sullivan, 
one hundred twenty-five and 56/100 (125.56) feet. Containing 44,917 square feet of land according to 



-105- 



(Article n cont'o;: 

said plan. Being the same premises conveyed to the said Mortgagers by deed of Matthew R. Comerford, 
Jr. and Mary A. Comerford recorded in said Registry on October 2, 1985, as Instrument Mo. 40809, Book 
3199 Page 343. (Article by Petition) Finance Committee and Planning Board recommends No Action 
the Moderator read a letter from the petitioner Michael Greer of his wish to withdraw the article no 
vote being needed it was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 12: (Drawn as #10) To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to file a 
petition with a state legislature to authorize the Town through a special act to abate the amount of 
$330.16, together with interest and additional costs, a sewer assessment imposed upon Frank and Mary 
Kaszynski of 3 Jones Avenue, Wilmington by the Water and Sewer Commissioners, notwithstanding 
Massachusetts General Law Chapter 80; or do anything in relation thereto. (Petition) Finance 
Committee approved Motion, Mary B. Kaszynski "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to file a petition with the state legislature to authorize the Town by a special act to abate 
the amount of $330.16, together with interest and additional costs for a sewer assessment imposed upon 
Frank and Mary Kaszynski of 3 Jones Avenue, Wilmington by the Water and Sewer Commissioners, 
notwithstanding Massachusetts General Law Chapter 80." Seconded Bob Cain explained that they live 
between two streets both having sewer hookups, and this family was being charged from both sides, vote 
was unanimously so voted 

ARTICLE 13: (drawn as #1): To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $3,700 by 
taxation, transfer from available funds or by borrowing to purchase and/or take by eminent domain a 
4,500 square foot parcel of land owned by Josephine LaCourt McKinnon described as Map 6 Parcel 127 
located on Bowdoin Street off Burlington Ave.; said parcel to be used in conjunction with a number of 
Town owned parcels for affordable housing; or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee No 
action. Motion by James Stewart, "I move that the Town vote to pass over this article and take no 
action thereon." Motion seconded and so voted to pass over. 

With all business having been taken up in accordance with our By-laws the Moderator asked for a motion 
to adjourn. Motion was made and seconded at 9:44 PM Their were (three hundred thirty-nine (339) 
voters in attendance and thirteen (13) Non-voters. This was our first live cable transmission to local 
cable Channel 6. 

The vote of ARTICLE 6 to appropriate $852,705. by BONDING with 2 1/2 debt exemption will depend on the 
outcome of the Special Election to be held November 4, 1989. 



Prisci I la R. Ward, CMC 
Town Clerk 
Wi Imington 

WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION 
NOVEMBER 4, 1989 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 

TO THE CONSTABLES OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By-Laws 
of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote 
in Town affairs to meet and assemble at the Town Hall Auditorium 121 Glen Road (Precincts 1, 2, and 5), 
and the Wildwood School, (Precincts 3, 4 and 6), Saturday, the fourth day of November, A.D. 1989 at 9:45 
in the forenoon, the polls to be opened at 10:00 in the forenoon and shall be closed at 8:00 p.m. for 
the vote on Questions 1 and 2 as follows: 

Question #1: "Shall the Town of Wilmington be allowed to exempt from the provisions of Proposition 2 
1/2, so called, the amounts required to pay for the bond issued in order to provide for reconstructing 
and making extraordinary repairs to the heating system of the present high school?" 
Yes NO 

All was in readiness at 9:45 a.m. and the polls were declared open in accordance with all By-laws at 
10:00 a.m. 

The totals from the twenty-five machines plus the absentee ballots were recorded and declaration thereof 
made, as by law is directed: 

Question #1 Yes 856 NO 726 

The polls were closed at 8:00 p.m. with One thousand five hundred eighty-two (1,582) voters voting and 
an and twenty-three (23) absentee ballots. 15. 5X of the registered voters. 

Priscilla R. Ward, CMC 
Town Clerk 
Wi Imington 



-106- 



REPORT OF THE TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
June 30, 1989 



Members of the Board of Selectmen 

and Town Manager 
Town Hal I 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 01887 

The General Purpose Financial Statements of the Town of Wilmington, Massachusetts, for the fiscal 
year ended June 30, 1989 is submitted herewith. This report was prepared by the Town Accountant. 
Responsibility for both the accuracy of the presented data and the completeness and fairness of 
the presentation, including all disclosures, rests with the Town. 

I believe the data, as presented, is accurate in all material aspects; that it is presented in a 
manner designed to fairly set forth the financial position and results of operations of the Town 
as measured by the financial activity of its various funds; and that all disclosures necessary to 
enable the reader to gain the maximum understanding of the Town's financial affairs have been 
i nc I uded . 

Respectfully submitted, 

Michael Morris 
Town Accountant 



-107- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

June 30, 1989 



-108- 



Town of Wilmington, Massachusetts 
COHPREHENSIVE ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT 
Table of Contents 



FINANCIAL SECTION PAGE 

Combined Balance Sheet - All fund Types and Account Group 110 

Notes to Financial Statements 112 

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION 

Schedule of Combined Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes 
in Fund Balances - All Governmental Fund Types and Expendable 

Trust Funds 114 

Schedule of Expenditures and Encumbrances Compared Uith 

Authorizations by Function and Activity - General Fund 116 

Schedule of Expenditures and Encumbrances Compared With Authorizations 

by Function and Activity - Federal Revenue Sharing Fund 128 

Schedule of Revenues and Expenditures - Water Department Operations 129 

Schedule of Revenues and Expenditures - Capital Project Fund 130 

Schedule of Debt Retirement 131 

Schedule of Trust Funds 132 



-109- 



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-111- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
June 30, 1989 
Summary of Significant Accounting Policies 

The accounting policies for financial reporting purposes of the Town of Wilmington 
conform to generally accepted accounting principles for local governmental units except 
as indicated in Note 2. The following is a summary of the significant accounting 
pol icies: 

A. Fund Accounting 

The town reports its financial activities in several funds and one account group 
in order to comply with the limitations and restrictions placed on both the 
resources made available to the town and the services provided. The various funds 
are grouped in the financial statements in this report into five generic fund 
types and two broad fund categories as follows: 

GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS 

General Fund - The general fund is the general operating fund of the town. It is 
used to account for all financial resources except those required to be accounted 
for in another fund. 

Special Revenue Fund - General Revenue Sharing - This special revenue fund is 
used to account for the proceeds of the State and Local Fiscal Assistance Act and 
their expenditures as prescribed by the Office of Revenue Sharing. 

Special Revenue Funds - Others - This special revenue fund is used to account for 
the proceeds of specific revenue resources (other than general revenue sharing, 
expendable trust or major capital projects) that are legally restricted to 
expenditures for specific purposes. 

Capital Projects Fund - This fund is used to account for the purchase or 
construction of major capital facilities. 

FIDUCIARY FUNDS 

Trust and Agency Funds - Trust and agency funds are used to account for assets by 
the town in a trustee capacity or as an agent for individuals, private 
organizations, other governments and/or other funds. These include expendable 
trust, non-expendable trust and agency funds. Non-expendable trust funds are 
accounted for in a manner that permits the periodic measurement of revenues 
earned, expenses incurred and/or net income in order to demonstrate maintenance of 
capital. Expendable trust funds are accounted for in essentially the same manner 
as governmental funds. Agency funds are custodial in nature (assets equal 
liabilities) and do not involve measurement of results of operations. 

ACCOUNT GROUP 

Long-Term Debt and Liabilities - Long-term liabilities expected to be financed 
from governmental funds are accumulated in the general long-term debt group of 
accounts. This account group is not a fund. It is only concerned with the 
measurement of financial position and, therefore, is not involved with a 
measurement of the results from any operations. 

B. Basis of Accounting 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared principally on the 
modified accrual basis of accounting. This method recognizes revenues when they 
become measurable and available. Expenses are recognized under this method as 
they are incurred. 



-112- 



Revenue Recognition - Property tax revenues are recognized when they become 
available. Available means then due or past due and receivable within the current 
period or expected to be collected soon enough thereafter to be used to pay 
liabilities of the current period. 

All other revenues are recognized throughout the year when cash is received. 
Receipts during the sixty days immediately following the close of the fiscal year 
are also recognized as available revenue. 

In applying the susceptible to accrual concept to intergovernmental revenues, the 
legal and contractual requirements of the numerous individual programs are used as 
guidance. There are, however, essentially two types of these revenues. In one, 
monies must be expended on the specific purpose or project before any amounts will 
be paid to the town, therefore, revenues are recognized based upon the 
expenditures recorded. In the other, monies are virtually unrestricted as to 
purpose of expenditure and are usually revocable only for failure to comply with 
prescribed compliance requirements. These resources are reflected as revenues at 
the time of receipt or earlier if the susceptible to accrual criteria is met. 

Expenses - Expenditures are recorded during the year on a cash disbursement 
basis. In addition, as required by Massachusetts General Laws, disbursements made 
during the fifteen days immediately following the close of each fiscal year and 
which pertain to the prior year are recorded as warrants payable and expenses as 
of June 30th. 

Purchase orders outstanding at June 30th related to annual operating expenses are 
recorded as encumbrances and, accordingly, as a reservation of fund balances at 
that date. 

Deferred Revenue - Property taxes and other revenues that are measurable but not 
available have been classified as deferred revenue on June 30, 1989. 

Departures from Generally Accepted Accounting Principles 

For years prior to 1985, the town presented its financial statements on the basis of 
accounting practices prescribed by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Department of 
Revenue. These practices differed in many significant respects from G.A.A.P. 

During 1981. the Commonwealth of Massachusetts issued a revised uniform municipal 
accounting system entitled "U.M.A.S." The departures from G.A.A.P. under this revised 
system have been significantly narrowed. The town has adopted a modified U.M.A.S. for 
its financial statement presentation for 1985. 

The significant departures from G.A.A.P. included in the Town of Wilmington's financial 
statements are: 

a. Retirement benefits are provided for on a "pay-as-you-go" basis rather than an 
acceptable acturarial cost methods (see note 5). 

b. General fixed asset acquisitions are recorded as expenditures at the time 
purchases are made rather than being capitalized in a general fixed asset group of 
accounts. 

c. Purchases for materials and supplies inventories are recorded as expenditures 
rather than assets at the time of purchase. 



-113- 



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30 LANCASTER STREET . BOSTON. MA 021 14 

TEL 61 7-742-7575 • FAX 61 7-720-1524 



FIRE ALARM SIGNALS 



31 Boutw*! School 
33 Buueii School 
35 Ont»f School 
37 Gl»n Rd School 
3a High School 

41 Mildrad Ro0*rs School 

42 Nonh lnt«ffn««3i«te 

School 

43 WMI School 

44 Swaih School 

46 V»«iK»f School 

47 West lniernD«di»le School 
46 Meat School 

49 Shawsheen School 
51 Ahiie»i«n3 School 

53 WiidwooO School 

54 VVoburn Sirael Schoo' 

121 Main& Church Sis 

122 Maini Middiesei Ave 
Car' Fastener 

1223 Wilmingtoo Bu'iderj 

123 Mam 4 Ciarn Sts 

124 Washington Ave 

125 Wilmington Plaza 

126 Mam St 4 Bridge Lane 

127 Brand Ave 4 Wiser St 

128 Baker St 4 Tapim Ave 

129 Phillips Ave 4 Wiser St 

131 MoDson Ave 4 Miles St 

132 Mam St 4 

Massachuset's Ave 

133 Massachusetts Ave 4 

Biver St 

134 Mam 4 Harnoer- Sts 

135 St Dorothy s Churcn 

136 Veranda Ave 

13/ Mam St 4 Grove Ave 

130 Grove 4 Wild Aves 

139 Grove Ave 4 Burnap St 

141 Grove Ave 4 Lake St 

142 Mam St 4 Glen Rd 

143 Mam 4 Lake Sis 

144 Lake St 4 Warren Rd 

146 Mam 4 Davis Sts 

147 Fairfield Ave 
i48Mar|orie Rd 

149 Mam Si at Tewksoury 
Line 

21' Burlington 4 Fioradaie 
Aves 

21 1 1 Diamono Cr>stai Sai; 

Company 

2112 S«v«ethean Piasnc Corp 
212 Bu'iington Ave 4 

Harris St 
213r^ar SI 4 Burt Ra 

214 Oeming Way (Old Age 

Housing) 

215 Burlington Ave 4 

Chestnut St 

216 Chestnut St 4 

Butters Row 

217 Chestnut St 4 Mm Rd 

218 Chestnut St 4 

Hillside Way 

219 Hillside Way at 

Burlington Line 

221 Chestnut St near 

GollCiuD 

222 Chestnut Si at WoDurn 

Line 

223 Marion 4 Day Sts 

224 Marion 4 Cntton Sis 

225 Marion St to 

Chestnut St 

226 Robens Road 

227 Burlington Ave 4 

Boutwell St 

228 Boutwell St 4 Tad Rd 
229Tatt4SwainRds 

231 Roosevelt Rd 

232 Burlington Ave 4 

Dell Drive 

233 Burlington Ave 4 

Swam Rd 

234 Bmch St 

235 Burlington Ave 4 

Forest St 



236 Burlington Ave at 

Burlington Lme 

237 Forest St 4 Congress St 

238 Forest St 4 

Randolph Rd 

239 Forest St 4 

Cochrane Rd 

241 Eiwood Rd 

242 Forest St 4 

Edwards Rd 

251 Shawsheen Ave 4 

Canal St 

252 Canal St 4 Bun Rd 

253 Grand S' 

254 Nassau Ave 4 

Ounton Rd 

255 Shawsheen Ave 4 

Carter Lane 

256 Carter Lane 

Norfolk St 

257 Amherst Rd 

258 AuOurn Ave 

259 Ferguson Rd 

261 Shawsheen Ave 4 

Aldrich Rd 
2e2AldricnRa 4 

Hardin Si 
253 Aldrich Rd 4 

Kendall St 

264 Aidncr- Rd 4 

Boutwell St 

265 Aldrich Rd 4 f-oresi St 
266Wmston Av» 

267 Aidnrn Rd at 

B'Her'Ca Lme 

268 Shawsheen Ave near 

Cranberry Bog 

269 W. Hon Drive 

271 Shawsheen Ave ^ 
Bono St 

273 Shawsheen Ave 4 

Hopkins St 

274 Hopkins 4 C^iu -nbia 

Streets 

275 Hopkins 4 Dorchester 

Streets 

276 Hopkins St at 

Bilierica Line 

277 Shawsheen Ave 4 

Nichols St 

278 Nichols St 4 

Fairmoadow Rd 

279 Fairmeadow 4 

Jere Rds 

281 Nichols St at 

Bilierica Line 

282 Shawsheen Ave at 

Bilierica Linp 

311 Mam St 4 OuDiir. Ave 

312 Mam 4 Lowell Sis 
3121 Hayden Mica Co 

313 Mam St 4 Butlers Row 

314 Mam St at Town Park 
3142 Brewsters 

315 Mam 4 Eames Sts 

316 Eames St 

3132 Polyvinyl Chemical 

3161 J W Greer Co 

3162 National Poiychemical 

Co Inc 

3163 Dragon Cement Co 

3164 JBF Scientilic Jewell 

Drive 

3165 Harwich Chemical 
Jewell Drive 

3166 Altron Industrial 4 

Progress Way 

317 Cook Ave 

3171 Ralti 4 Swanson 

318 Mam St atWoburnLine 

321 Lowell 4 ParVer Sis 
3211 Parker 4 Laurel Sis 

322 Parker 4 Blacksione Sts 
3223 Allen Par* Drive 

3222 Allen Park 4 Sheldon Sts 

323 Lowell 4 Cross Sts 

324 Lowell 4 Bay Sts 



3241 AvcoCorp 

325 Lowell 4 Wobum Sis 

326Woburn4 Elm Sts 
3261 Stapan Chemical 

327WoburnSt 4 

Brentwood Ave 

328WoburnSt 4 
Morse Ave 

329 Wobum 4 Eames Sts 
J291 Terrell Corp 
1292 Jeltrey Chemicai 

3293 NAPA 

3294 Ritter Trucking 

3295 Analog Devices 

331 Wobum St 4 

industrial Way 

3313 Commodity Warehouse 

3314 Market Forge 
33i5Smithcralt 

3316 C'usader Paper Co 
331P Compugraphic 

332 Strout Ave 

333 Lowell Si 4 

Woodland Rd 

334 Lowell 4 West Sis 

335 West St 4 Westdaie 

Avenue 
336AyotieSi 4 Crest 
Avenue 

337 Nickerson Ave 

338 West Si 4 

Suncrest Ave 

339 Suncres! Ave 4 

Meadow Lane 

341 west Si 4 industrial Way 
34' • Comoographic 

90 inousinai Way 

3412 Compugraphics 

3413 Scully Signal 
3415 Compugraphic 
3417 ADS 

342 Lowell Si Rte 93 

and Reading Lme 
34^3 Avco Progress wav 

411 Church SI Fire Station 

412 Church 4 Columbia Sts 

413 Church 4 Beacon Sts 
'14 Beacon St 4 

Beimom Ave 

415 State St 4 

Fairview Ave 

416 Church 4 Clark Sts 

417 Methodist Church 
4l8ChurchSt 4 

Thurston Ave 
I 419 Church 4 Adams Sis 

421 Chandler 4 Keney Rds 

422 Adams St E«t 

423 Church St 4 

Middiesen Ave 
4231 New Library 
4232 Baptist Church 

424 Middlesex Ave 4 

Adelaide St 

425 Middlesex Ave 4 

Clark St 

426 Clark St 4 

Railroad Ave 

427 Middlesex Ave 4 

Adams St 

428 St Thomas Church 
4281 ViiianovaHaii 

429 Middlesex Ave 4 

School St 

431 School St 4 Drury Lane 

432 Drury Lane 4 Loumac Rd 

433 Powderhouse Circle 

434 Middlesex Ave 4 

Wiidwood St 

435 Wildwood Si near 

Cemeleo 

436 Wildwood St near 

Vels Housing 

437 Wildwood 4 Woburn 

Streets 

438 Wing Rd 

511 Middlesex Ave 4 
Glen Rd 



512 Giendaie Circle 

513 Glen Rd 4 

Lawrence St 

51 4 Lawrence St 4 

Lawrence Ct 

515 Lawrence St 4 

Hamlin Lane 

516 Glen Rd at 

R R Crossing 

517 Glen Rd 4 Fay St 

518 Glen Rd 4 King St 

519 King Si 4 Garden 

Ave 

521 King 4 Kilby SiS 

522 King 4 Broad Sts 

523 Glen Rd 4 Cypress St 

524 Glen Rd 4 Brattle St 

525 Glen Rd 4 Harnden St 

526 Glen 4 Miller Rds 

527 Faulkner 4 Beechmg 

Aves 

528 Faulkner 4 Allston 

Aves 

529 Jones Ave 

531 Town Hall 

532 Congregational Church 

533 Middlesex Ave 4 

Federal Si 

534 Fecerai 4 Concord Streets 

535 Federal 4 Grant Sts 

536 Federal 4 Wilson Sis 

537 Federal 4 Lincoln Sts 

538 Federal 4 Pershmg SIS 

539 Federal 4 L ibrar> Sts 
041 Federal 4 Wobum Sts 

542 Woburn 4 West Sts 

543 West 4 Kilmarnock Sts 

545 Wobum Si at 

R R Crossing 

546 Concord 4 Woburn Sts 
5461 Oymo Graphics Systems 

547 Concord St at Rte 93 
5471 Compugraphics Concord 

St 

54 7 2 Dynamics Research 

5474 General Electnc 

5475 Volkswagen 

51^6 ^'uoeniiai fordnamRd 

5477 Dupom Fordham f<oad 

5478 Machinist lor 

Electronics 

5479 Barbo 

548 Concord St at North 

Reading Lme 

549 Woburr St ai 281 

551 Middlesex 4 Mystic 

Aves 

551 1 Dymo Graphics Systems 

5512 Photon Inc 

5513 D F Munroe Paper Co 

5514 Waitham Door 4 

Window Co 

552 Middlesex Ave 4 Shady 

Lane Dri e 
5521 Mytron Inc 

553 Shady Lane Drive 4 

Oakdale Rd 

554 Shady Lane Drive 4 

Birchwood Rd 

555 Shady Lane Dnve 4 

Sprucewood Rd 

556 Pinewood 4 Oakdale 

Roads 

557 Birchwood 4 Judith Rds 

558 Shady Lane Drive 4 

Lawrence St 

611 No Wilmington 

Shopping Center 

612 Middlesex Ave 4 

North St 

613 North St 4 

Pinendge Rd 

614 Nonh St 4 MarciaRd 

615 Middlesex Ave 4 

High St 

616 Linda 4 Carolyn Rds 

617 High 4 Woburn SiS 

618 Woburn 4 Par* Sts 



619 Park St 4 Gowing Rd 

621 Gowing 4 Marcus Rds 

622 Park Si at No Reading 

Line 

623 Middlesex Ave 4 

Salem Si 

624 Arlene 4 Csiherme 

Aves 

825 Barbara 4 Dorothy 
Aves 

626 Salem St at 

R R Crossing 

627 Salem 4 Cunningham 

Streets 

628 Salem St 4 

McDonald Rd 

629 McDonald Rd to End 

631 Royal Si 

632 Salem St at Tewksbury 

Line 

633 Salem 4 Baiiardvale 

Streets 

634 BaiiardvaieSt at 

Rte 125 

t34i ComcKjgrapnic Baiiardvaie Si 
535 BaiiardvaieSt at 

No 211 

6351 Charles River Breeding 

6352 Georgia Paci'ic 

636 Baiiardvaie St at 

No 326 

637 Baiiardvale Si at Andover 

Line 

638 Saiem Si at Rte 93 

639 Saiem 4 Woburn Sts 

641 Woburn St 4 

Hathaway Rd 

642 Hawthorne Rd 

643 Hathaway 4 

Pilling Rd 

644 Hathaway 4 Gunderson 

Roads 

645 Salem St 4 Thrush Rd 

646 Thrush Rd 4 

M^rie Drive 

647 Salem St at Nonh 

Reading Lme 
6451 Wilmmgton Regional 
Health Center 

6471 Cronin 5 Pit 

6472 Benevento s Pit 

648 Woburn 4 Andover 

Streets 

6481 Pumping Station 

(Water Depi ) 

6482 Amswonh Road 

6483 Highway Dept 

649 Andover St 4 Rte 125 

651 Andover St at No 319 

652 Andover Si at Andover 

Line 

SPECIAL SIGNALS 

1 Test 

2 All out (test 9 a m 4 

9p m I 

3 Special Can 

4 Brush Fire 

5 Police Call 
666 Civil Defense 

7 Boy Scouts 

22 No School (6 30 a m 
7 CCa m I 

2 Followed by 3 rounds Of 

box second alarr, 

3 Followed by 3 rounds ol 

box general alarm 
MUTUAL AID 
(two rounds or^ly) 

8 Out of Town 

81 To Andover 

82 To Bilierica 

83 To Burlington 

84 To Lowell 

85 To No Reading 

86 To Reading 

87 To Tewksbury 
8B To Woburn 



FIRE - AMBULANCE 
EMERGENCY: 6M-3200 
658-3346 



POLICE 
EMERGENCY: 658-3331 

658-5071 
658-5072 



TOWN HALL 
658-331 1 



WobuTf, Siren 
Hntlardvale ilr. 



935-5966 



Government is not a substitute for people, hut simply the 
instrument through which they act. In the last analysis, 
our only freedom is the freedom to discipline ourselves. 

Bernard M. Baruch 



5 4'^'^ T 



WILMINGTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY 




3 2136 00199 8123 



For Reference 

Not to be taken from this room